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Old 04-25-2007, 02:38 PM   #1
mitchell7man
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Server, how do i determine what IP, and hostname to user? or what do i need...


Hello,
I am not an expert in linux, i'm actually rather new, but i want to set up a webserver using ubuntu feisty server edition. I plan on using these instructions here. What i don't know is what i need to do or how i determine the hostname i should use, the ip adress and gateway i should use?, I will probably have more questions as i go on, but this is the first. Thanks, and i appreciate any help i can get.
 
Old 04-25-2007, 03:19 PM   #2
djjoshuad
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the first thing you have to figure out is where the server is going to sit. For lots of linux beginners, their new server will sit on their home network behind a router. If that's the case, you've got a ton of choices for how to lay out your network. Most likely, you'll just want to stay in the same /24 as the rest of your PCs which will probably mean an IP address something like 192.168.1.200. The best way to figure out what IP to use (if you won't be using DHCP - most servers don't) is to look up what DHCP addresses your router is using in its pool, then pick one outside of that range but still within the same /24. Then your default gateway is easy, just use the same one that your other PCs do (usually your router's private IP - like 192.168.1.1) and use a netmask of 255.255.255.0 (otherwise noted as /24). I'm guessing that you're not running DNS on your network, so you won't have to worry about setting your new host up there, but you will likely want to configure your host to resolve names against the same DNS servers that the rest of your PCs are using. These probably belong to your ISP.

I may be *way* off on my assumptions... but if I'm right, I hope this helps

-J
 
Old 04-25-2007, 04:09 PM   #3
mitchell7man
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i see the something like... but how do i know what that something is for sure, do i just check my IP on another computer in my network, and get the router ip, also where can i find the netmask, or what program, or command do i use to get this network info?, my ip can't be the same as another computer on my network right?, so how do i know what IP to assign?... ive never done this so all help is appreciated.
 
Old 04-25-2007, 04:25 PM   #4
djjoshuad
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you're right - you won't be able to use the same IP on more than one computer.

Lemme 'splain a couple things -

IP management is pretty simple on a small scale, but can be very complex on a large scale. that's where DHCP servers came from. DHCP provides (among a lot of other things) a way to distribute IP addresses in an automated fashion to the computers that need them. An IP address that is assigned specifically to your machine and never changes is usually called a "static IP". An IP address that is part of a pool and is assigned on an as-needed basis is commonly called a "dynamic IP". DHCP can actually handle both of these scenarios, but on the more common home-type DHCP servers (usually built into a router), it usually just does the dynamic type. This means that every time each of your computers starts up, it asks the DHCP server for an address. The DHCP server then "leases" one to the computer for a pre-determined amount of time, after which the computer will need to ask again. the computer may have to assume a new IP at this point, or the DHCP server may simply renew the lease... it's all about how you configure the server. Most home routers simply re-lease. It's a pretty safe bet that all of the PCs you currently have on your network are using DHCP to get their IP addresses.

In your case, a DHCP server is not completely necessary... but it may help you get rolling on your new project. It's also not set in stone, so once you get a handle on things you can always go back and give it a static IP. Chances are that your home network already has a DHCP server on it, so you can configure your new server to lease an IP from the DHCP server. This will at least get you up and running.

If this is your first foray into the linux world, I suggest installing a linux desktop first. It should be much easier to get going and will help you learn some of the key concepts that you'll need in order to launch your first server. With ubuntu's desktop product, you won't even need a set of instructions to follow, you can just pop in the CD and install away. then you will have a fully functional, real-live linux box to play with and learn from.

I hope this is helpful stuff... I'll try and respond later tonight if you have any more questions.

Last edited by djjoshuad; 04-25-2007 at 04:28 PM.
 
Old 04-25-2007, 05:21 PM   #5
mitchell7man
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Okay, this isn't my first linux experience, just my first linux server experience. Are you suggesting using lamp or what exactly are you saying?
 
Old 04-25-2007, 06:09 PM   #6
Zention
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He is explaining how DHCP works.

To find your IP number: ipconfig -a

To find you host name: hostname or perhaps uname -a

If this is a business speak to your administrator.

If this is a home network and you are running a firewall router modem, then you probably need to open a hole in it, normally that means you have to forward to that machine and place it in the DMZ (demilitarized zone).

Once that is in place people would contact your webserver via your Internet IP number which is the external IP number for your network on the other side of the masquerade. You will always need to ensure that the IP number is static on the internal side of the maquerade or use some other mechanism in-conjunction with the DMZ and DHCP.

If your machine is already on the net then it is already available and you might just have to configure the firewall.

Anyway first thing to do is just install the web server. And then you can connect on 127.0.0.1 using a browser to see if it works.

NB a lot of ISPs are not really keen on you hosting your website off a home account so check the terms and conditions.

Last edited by Zention; 04-25-2007 at 06:12 PM.
 
Old 04-25-2007, 07:31 PM   #7
mitchell7man
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I just installed a LAMP server, and over the next few days will be configuring everything, is there a good explanatory tutorial?, also what exactly does webmin do?, is that a good way to configure a server, is it on the server, or do you put it on another system to connect to the server and configure etc. thanks again... I was also looking at a cpanel ISPConfig is that a good product, and is that on the server or a foreign computer (i would guess it is on the server).... all help is appreciated,
when i vi something to edit, what do i do to save changes, and return to command prompt?

Last edited by mitchell7man; 04-25-2007 at 07:33 PM.
 
  


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