LinuxQuestions.org
Download your favorite Linux distribution at LQ ISO.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Server
User Name
Password
Linux - Server This forum is for the discussion of Linux Software used in a server related context.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 10-21-2009, 05:43 AM   #1
tobiascapin
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2009
Posts: 6

Rep: Reputation: 0
Scheduled reboot?


Hello, i have a little Dell server with Debian 5 with samba and a webserver. I would like to know if you suggest to schedule a server reboot or do you think this is not usefult for server stability?
I thought to reboot the server at 2 AM, or better to shutdown it at 0AM and poweron (if I can setup it by its bios) at 7AM.

What do you think?
Thanks.
 
Old 10-21-2009, 06:07 AM   #2
linuxlover.chaitanya
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Location: Nagpur, India
Distribution: Cent OS 5/6, Ubuntu Server 10.04
Posts: 4,627

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Personally I would not do this. If you have got some special requirements where in reboot or shutdown is necessary, you could do that but if there is no such requirement, why do it?
Both Dell servers and Debian are robust products and would definitely run without issues on months together.
There have been instances where Linux servers were not rebooted for several months or year or so.
 
Old 10-21-2009, 06:09 AM   #3
EricTRA
Guru
 
Registered: May 2009
Location: Gibraltar, Gibraltar
Distribution: Fedora 20 with Awesome WM
Posts: 6,805
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1290Reputation: 1290Reputation: 1290Reputation: 1290Reputation: 1290Reputation: 1290Reputation: 1290Reputation: 1290Reputation: 1290
Hello,

I have several Debian servers (10) running at our office and none of them has a scheduled reboot configured. We also have Windoze servers (45) and they need a regular reboot. In my opinion a scheduled reboot is not necessary on a Linux server if it's administered correctly.

Kind regards,

Eric
 
Old 10-21-2009, 06:13 AM   #4
Tux-Slack
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Location: Slovenia
Distribution: Slackware 13.37
Posts: 511

Rep: Reputation: 36
Only time you really need to reboot is when you upgrade your kernel. So why do it daily?
Even so, what's the point of a server if it gets shut down at midnight and booted up again at 7am?
 
Old 10-21-2009, 06:18 AM   #5
acid_kewpie
Moderator
 
Registered: Jun 2001
Location: UK
Distribution: Gentoo, RHEL, Fedora, Centos
Posts: 43,414

Rep: Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966
how does a scheduled reboot improve stability? It admits / assumes that you have VERY BAD stability already... this isn't windows... why would you want to restart a server that is working fine?
 
Old 10-21-2009, 06:24 AM   #6
catkin
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Tamil Nadu, India
Distribution: Servers: Debian Squeeze and Wheezy. Desktop: Slackware64 14.0. Netbook: Slackware 13.37
Posts: 8,551
Blog Entries: 28

Rep: Reputation: 1176Reputation: 1176Reputation: 1176Reputation: 1176Reputation: 1176Reputation: 1176Reputation: 1176Reputation: 1176Reputation: 1176
The only reason for doing so would be electrical energy conservation -- think of the penguins -- but even then the thermal cycling may make components fail early and there's a lot of energy invested in creating them. If you're running AC to extract the heat created by used electrical energy then the savings are more significant.
 
Old 10-21-2009, 07:06 AM   #7
tobiascapin
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2009
Posts: 6

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thanks you all,
i thounght to reboot becausa i came from a windows sistem ... so you can understand my question!
Furthermore, I think that 7 hours per day of poweroff can be good for the components stress and maybe can reduce the hardware failure (-30% of use)... but maybe is a bad idea just because i'm very new of server administration.

Thanks again, i think i will not schedule reboot ...

Bye
 
Old 10-21-2009, 10:04 AM   #8
acid_kewpie
Moderator
 
Registered: Jun 2001
Location: UK
Distribution: Gentoo, RHEL, Fedora, Centos
Posts: 43,414

Rep: Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966Reputation: 1966
-30% use, but on average 1000x more spinups and spindowns, etc... change of physical state = wear & tear.
 
Old 10-22-2009, 02:10 AM   #9
linuxlover.chaitanya
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Location: Nagpur, India
Distribution: Cent OS 5/6, Ubuntu Server 10.04
Posts: 4,627

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
I would disagree OP that shutdown and reboot would increase the life expectancy of components. It should rather be opposite of what you think.
The more you reboot the machine, more the temperature variations components have to handle. The more the temperature variations, more the wear and tear. That would in turn reduce the life of your hardware.
 
Old 10-22-2009, 02:26 AM   #10
tobiascapin
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2009
Posts: 6

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
I did not know that... thanks again.
Do you think that in a good server must be installed something as monit?
This is not a big server and this has nothing so important (file sharing and a management web application).. but i don't know if a process crash can be happend often.

Bye
 
Old 10-22-2009, 02:30 AM   #11
linuxlover.chaitanya
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Location: Nagpur, India
Distribution: Cent OS 5/6, Ubuntu Server 10.04
Posts: 4,627

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
It would depend on the usage. If you have got a good hardware resources and you think your memory would seldom be a problem and no process will die for lack of memory then you can do without it. But it is a personal choice. Monit is just an application. If you think you do not need complex monitoring, you can use some simple to use monitoring like top, ntop and all.
But it is definitely suggested that you do monitoring in some form.
 
Old 10-22-2009, 04:41 AM   #12
avijitp
Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Location: India
Distribution: FC11, Debian/Ubuntu, RHEL, Solaris, AIX, HP-UX
Posts: 161

Rep: Reputation: 32
This tends to happen to any SA who has earlier worked on Windows. I have seen server having uptime for more that 3000 days (They were not patched due to some business need) and serving happily ever after.
 
  


Reply

Tags
reboot, server, shutdown, stability


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
scheduled fsck turns into reboot cycle TotalLinuxNoob Ubuntu 1 04-13-2009 02:20 AM
Scheduled tasks gubak Linux - Newbie 3 04-24-2007 02:34 AM
Poll Already Scheduled ????? arunabh_biswas Linux - Networking 4 01-27-2007 05:30 PM
When is 10.2 scheduled to come out? dougnc Suse/Novell 1 10-16-2006 07:13 AM
scheduled task trebek Linux - Software 4 09-24-2006 03:37 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:11 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration