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Old 03-07-2002, 08:31 PM   #1
l_9_l
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Question Users hierarchy--similar to win2k;Group--password


Hi Everybody;

Q1:How can I create users hierarchy similar to M$ Win 2k users hierarchy?

Q2:What's the benfit of setting a password to a group of users? "passwd -g group_name"
 
Old 03-08-2002, 01:18 AM   #2
unSpawn
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1. I can't see a difference as there are users, privileged users and some admins, so what do you mean by "W2k users hierarchy"?
2. AFAIK you can't password a group.
 
Old 03-08-2002, 02:19 AM   #3
l_9_l
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1.In Linux there's just two types of users--root+regulars users,on the other hand win2k has many types of users--administrator+power users+users+guests ..
How can I do the same thing in Linux?

2.What's does "passwd -g group_name" do?!
-qoutes from "man passwd"
'Group passwords
When the -g option is used, the password for the named group is changed. The user must
either be the super user, or a group administrator for the named group. The current group
password is not prompted for. The -r option is used with the -g option to remove the cur-
rent password from the named group. This allows group access to all members. The -R
option is used with the -g option to restrict the named group for all users.'

3.How can I let an user to just use specific program no more?
e.g.---> just use "netscape"
 
Old 03-08-2002, 09:52 AM   #4
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Group passwords can be used to allow users to manage group memberships or to join groups they might not be a part of by default (like joining "wheel" to su, etc). You can set up group admins and such, but I've never personally found a good use for this.

I suppose you could use groups to help establish a concept of "Power Users". You can also install the "sudo" package if your distro doesn't already have it. This allows you to assign normal users access to "superuser" commands (like running the apache restart script, etc). You can create groups and such within the sudo structure as to emulate the structure you see in Windows.

Just my $.04
 
  


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