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Old 10-05-2004, 09:47 AM   #1
Erik Jan
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Registered: Sep 2004
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Writing to Floppy and USB-stick not supported?


Since about a week I have SUSE 9.1 installed on my computer. I cannot get the Speedtouch 330 USB modem working. I have the feeling I am almost there. I discovered log files on my hdd and tried to copy some to my floppy disk. Writing to this device is not supported. I tried the same with my USB stick, and here also writing to the device is not supported. But what can these devices be for than writing to them and reading from them. It sounds weird to me that the programmers of SUSE forgot tto program for writing to a mass storage device.

Does anybody know what to do about this?

Erik Jan.
 
Old 10-05-2004, 09:55 AM   #2
michapma
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What did you do to mount them? It is necessary to mount the filesystems on these devices before you can read and write with them. Do you have any documentation with your SUSE?

Here is a decent doc to get you started:
http://linux-newbie.sunsite.dk/

You need to use the command "mount" (without quotes).
 
Old 10-05-2004, 02:50 PM   #3
Erik Jan
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Registered: Sep 2004
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I did not do anything to "mount"them. I do not evenknow what that is. I tried to install the drivers to get my speedtouch 330 USB modem working. This has not succeeded till now, but suddenly the system detected my USB memory stick. I do not remember whether before this the system detected a floppy disk. I did not do much more than clicking around a bit. It appears that with Linux we are back in the days of DOS or early windows with an almighty command line, the real thing, and a superposed GUI as eyecandy.


Erik Jan.
 
Old 10-05-2004, 03:27 PM   #4
michapma
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Three observations:

1) A GUI is always superimposed eye candy.
2) DOS was quite possibly Microsoft's best OS to date, don't knock it.
3) I don't know how to say this without it coming off the wrong way, but if you are afraid of a command line and reading then perhaps you had better consider finding yourself a system administrator.

Try doing the following, just as an experiment: insert a floppy into the drive, open a command window as root (just type su and hit enter in the terminal and then give in the root password) and type in the following:
mount /dev/fd0 /media/floppy

If the system doesn't tell you anything, then it worked. If it complains, then make a directory anywhere with mkdir: "mkdir mydirectory", then type "mount /dev/fd0 /media/floppy". Change to the directory:
cd /media/floppy
or else
cd /wherever-you-put-it/mydirectory

See if there are any files on it by typing "ls -l". If there aren't, then try writing to it.

If the floppy is formatted for Windows, you might have to use "mount -t vfat /dev/fd0 /media/floppy"

Each system does things a little differently. SUSE might have a different place reserved for floppies than /media/floppy.

If you want the files on the floppy to be usable later, you'll have to first exit the directory (eg, /media/floppy), and type "umount /media/floppy". This unmounts the floppy.

Now since you don't like the console, you can rest assured that SUSE has catered to this. In fact I wouldn't like to have to mount a floppy each time I want to use it either. But this is a good exercise for you to learn that any operating system has to be told about a new file system, which is exactly what a floppy is. I have SUSE 8.0 and it has a floppy icon on the desktop. As I recall, if I stick a floppy in and interface that icon, the icon executes the code for you, mounting the floppy's file system and making it available to you.

You might be interested to know that Windows does the same thing in just a different way. With Windows you have less control over the process, which with normal use is not too much of an obstacle.

You might also be interested to know that there is a file-system table stored on your system, which tells the system the default mounts. Type in the following at your terminal (you needn't be root):
cat /etc/fstab

You will probably find a line in there that starts with /dev/fd0. The next entry in that line is the default location for mounting your floppy.

Your SUSE system comes with help files, if you would like to be more productive with it, you might consider reading some of them to get the basics. SUSE could be a good distro for you, because they do a good job of automating a fair number of tasks.

As they say, "Have a lot of fun!"
 
Old 10-05-2004, 04:36 PM   #5
Erik Jan
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Registered: Sep 2004
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Thank you, Michapma, for your reply.

In WinXP nowadays the essential things like floppies, HDDs, memory sticks or cards are detected and accessible. I do not need to know the techincal ins and outs.

From SUSE I got the impression that is a working OS, so I never thougt I should have to learn again arcane commands and parameters just to get the essential things done. Ii my opinion an OS worth its salt should be able to do these things "out of the box".

It is late now in Holland, so tomorrow I shall try the suggestions you made.

Thanks again for your speedy reply.

Erik Jan.
 
Old 10-09-2004, 10:44 AM   #6
Erik Jan
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Registered: Sep 2004
Posts: 11

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Dear Michapma,

I have followed your advice. I have been reading in the help files and tried your commands. Very instructive.

Nevertheless writing to protocol devices is still not supported.

The help files are for general instructions, not for troubleshooting when something does not work.

Thus I could not find the supposed location of pppoatm, the system gives a fatal error at bootup that it cannot find this file. I am typing this message under Windows. SuSe does not work even after following all instructions that friendly people like you gave me.

I am afraid SuSe 9.1 is just not good enough, not yet ready for sale to home users who want to do work with their computer, not do puzzles in the operating system.

After five afternoons of wasting time trying to get Linux to work I have however decided to give it one more try. But not with SuSe, of course. I shall try Mandrake 10.0.

Erik.
 
  


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