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Old 02-03-2007, 04:36 PM   #16
wildar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stupeas
This is what i get from "df" ( by the way, at the moment im in GNOME, but i have KDE as well, Should i swap?)

Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/hda5 7.7G 2.6G 4.8G 35% /
/dev/hda7 5.1G 47M 5.1G 1% /home
/dev/hda1 20G 13G 7.5G 62% /mnt/win_c
/dev/hdb1 77G 46G 31G 60% /mnt/win_c2
/dev/hda2 43G 25G 18G 58% /mnt/win_d
No need to swap to KDE. Gnome should have same menu structure as KDE. Mandriva is pretty good about making them the same (usually). So if you want to use Smb4k, it's located same place in the Gnome application menu "Internet > File Transfer > Smb4k"

Regarding your NTFS partitions, your df results indicate the are all mounted:
/mnt/win_c = most likely C drive
/mnt/win_d = maybe D drive
/mnt/win_c2 = maybe E drive
I'm just guessing as to what drive letter those mount points are in relation to the Windows arrangement of the drives. Might be to confusing to explain why, so I'll not get into it here. Just use the Gnome file browser and click your way to those directories and you should be able to figure out which drive is which. If you want to rearrange the mount points and label them to be less confusing, we'll need to rename the directories and modify /etc/fstab. The choice is yours because at this point you have access to the NTFS partitions as of now.

And there is a way to write to NTFS, but recommend we start a new thread.
 
Old 02-03-2007, 04:39 PM   #17
willia01
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In widows you create a partition and format it.
Windows assigns a drive letter , and you access it using that.

In unix you create the partition (type ext* normally) and format it
you then create a directory and mount the partition on it.
It will happily mount most windows partitions as well.
once you have mounted it you can access the partition using the directory name you mounted it on.
You can mount it with various set's of permissions , including read only for a cdrom , or a filesystem you wish to read from but do not wan't to write to.

mounting simply means that you are placing the device / partition on top of a directory , and now everything that was in that directory is no longer visible , instead you see whatever data is in the partition.

Once you unmount it the old files in the directory will appear again, and the data in the partion will no longer be visible untill you mount it again.
the /etc/fstab is the file where you specify how and where unix/linux should mount the filesystem on a reboot.
 
Old 02-03-2007, 05:18 PM   #18
stupeas
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Found the mounted drives but the group is root and i cant get access.
 
Old 02-03-2007, 05:26 PM   #19
wildar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stupeas
Found the mounted drives but the group is root and i cant get access.
That's unusual. You should be able to browse the directories. You just wont be able to write to them at this time. Can you post your fstab?
Code:
$ cat /etc/fstab
 
Old 02-03-2007, 05:54 PM   #20
stupeas
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sorry it took so long, i had to go out.

[stuart@MAIN ~]$ cat /etc/fstab
/dev/hda5 / ext3 defaults 1 1
/dev/hda7 /home ext3 defaults 1 2
/dev/hdc /mnt/cdrom auto users,iocharset=utf8,noauto,ro,exec 0 0
/dev/hda1 /mnt/win_c ntfs nls=utf8,ro 0 0
/dev/hdb1 /mnt/win_c2 ntfs nls=utf8,ro 0 0
/dev/hda2 /mnt/win_d ntfs nls=utf8,ro 0 0
none /proc proc defaults 0 0
/dev/hda6 swap swap defaults 0 0
[stuart@MAIN ~]$
 
Old 02-03-2007, 06:03 PM   #21
stupeas
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Ive swaped into KDE now. Ive opened "Find Files/Folders" and looked in "file:/mnt", it displays:
win_c, win_c2 and win_d as being "inaccessable" in the permissions colum.
 
Old 02-03-2007, 06:18 PM   #22
stupeas
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If i double click "system" on desktop the drives show as hda1, hda2 and hdb1 in Konqueror. When i look at any of the disks properies, its "user" is root, and "group" is root.Access permissions for "group" and "others" are set to FORBIDEN. If i try and change "group" permission to "view content" it tells me "Could not change permissions for /mnt/win_c."

I thought i may be in for a sharp learning curve with linux, but this is silly!!!
 
Old 02-03-2007, 06:32 PM   #23
SciYro
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You cant change permissions for those that you dont have permission to even access.

You must become root, then change the permissions. The command
Code:
chmod 777 /mnt/win_{c,c2,d}
should do the trick, but you must be root user.
 
Old 02-03-2007, 06:33 PM   #24
wildar
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Not sure why, but the fstab is missing umask=0, we need to modify it. Here's what to do:
Code:
Open terminal and switch to root
  $ su
Make backup of fstab, just in case
  # mv /etc/fstab /etc/fstab.bak
Open fstab with gedit
  # gedit /etc/fstab
Copy paste and save the following:

/dev/hda5 / ext3 defaults 1 1
/dev/hda7 /home ext3 defaults 1 2
/dev/hdc  /mnt/cdrom auto umask=0,users,iocharset=utf8,noauto,ro,exec 0 0
/dev/hda1 /mnt/win_c  ntfs umask=0,nls=utf8,ro 0 0
/dev/hdb1 /mnt/win_c2 ntfs umask=0,nls=utf8,ro 0 0
/dev/hda2 /mnt/win_d  ntfs umask=0,nls=utf8,ro 0 0
none /proc proc defaults 0 0
/dev/hda6 swap swap defaults 0 0

Unmount one of the ntfs partitions
  # umount /mnt/win_d
Remount the partition
  # mount /mnt/win_d
Now use Gnome file browser and see if you can get to /mnt/win_d. If you can, repeat the umount, mount for each ntfs partion.
 
Old 02-03-2007, 06:38 PM   #25
stupeas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SciYro
You cant change permissions for those that you dont have permission to even access.

You must become root, then change the permissions. The command
Code:
chmod 777 /mnt/win_{c,c2,d}
should do the trick, but you must be root user.
Nope, still cant acces them. here is the out put from the command.

[stuart@MAIN ~]$ chmod 777 /mnt/win_{c,c2,d}
chmod: changing permissions of `/mnt/win_c': Read-only file system
chmod: changing permissions of `/mnt/win_c2': Read-only file system
chmod: changing permissions of `/mnt/win_d': Read-only file system
[stuart@MAIN ~]$
 
Old 02-03-2007, 06:48 PM   #26
stupeas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildar
Not sure why, but the fstab is missing umask=0, we need to modify it. Here's what to do:
Code:
Open terminal and switch to root
  $ su
Make backup of fstab, just in case
  # mv /etc/fstab /etc/fstab.bak
Open fstab with gedit
  # gedit /etc/fstab
Copy paste and save the following:

/dev/hda5 / ext3 defaults 1 1
/dev/hda7 /home ext3 defaults 1 2
/dev/hdc  /mnt/cdrom auto umask=0,users,iocharset=utf8,noauto,ro,exec 0 0
/dev/hda1 /mnt/win_c  ntfs umask=0,nls=utf8,ro 0 0
/dev/hdb1 /mnt/win_c2 ntfs umask=0,nls=utf8,ro 0 0
/dev/hda2 /mnt/win_d  ntfs umask=0,nls=utf8,ro 0 0
none /proc proc defaults 0 0
/dev/hda6 swap swap defaults 0 0

Unmount one of the ntfs partitions
  # umount /mnt/win_d
Remount the partition
  # mount /mnt/win_d
Now use Gnome file browser and see if you can get to /mnt/win_d. If you can, repeat the umount, mount for each ntfs partion.
You are a GENIOUS Wildar. Finaly success (well with "d" anyway). I'll see if I can do it with th other two. I dont have to do the cut and paste thing again do I?, just the unmount and mount.

I know im pushing it, but is there any chance of a simple explanation of what was going on (if its not simple just point me to the stuff i should be reading up on so that one day in the distant future i'll understand this stuff)

THANX again to EVERYONE who has helped a Linux dummy!!!
 
Old 02-03-2007, 07:15 PM   #27
wildar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stupeas
You are a GENIOUS Wildar. Finaly success (well with "d" anyway). I'll see if I can do it with th other two. I dont have to do the cut and paste thing again do I?, just the unmount and mount.
No need to copy paste the fstab, it's set and good to go. Just umount and mount the other partitions.

Quote:
I know im pushing it, but is there any chance of a simple explanation of what was going on (if its not simple just point me to the stuff i should be reading up on so that one day in the distant future i'll understand this stuff)
Not sure if I'm the guy to ask why things work, lol. fstab is a table the system uses to mount partitions when system boots up. It defines the device to be mounted, mount point, file system type, and other stuff. For more detailed information, try doing "$ man fstab". This will show the in system manual about fstab.
Another function of fstab is it lets you use mount command without having to define everything manually from command line as long as you call for the mount point that is defined in fstab
Code:
e.g.
# mount /mnt/win_d

instead of
 
# mount -t ntfs /dev/hda2 /mnt/win_d

and this is with basic options.  Do # man mount and you'll see what I mean
Quote:
THANX again to EVERYONE who has helped a Linux dummy!!!
You are welcome, that's why this board exists. To help each other. You not a dummy, your a novice and that's nothing to be ashamed of. We all started where you are now.

Enjoy and welcome to the revolution.
 
  


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