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Old 09-29-2015, 12:25 PM   #1
ArtKautz
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Windows fonts from a PC (Windows 7) to another PC (Linux Mint (17.2)) - not dual boot


One PC is running Windows 7. The other is running Linux Mint 17.2. This is NOT a dual boot setup. Is it possible to put either a folder or files from the Windows PC onto a flash drive and then add it somehow (I have no idea where the Linux machine stores the fonts it uses) to the Linux machine?
 
Old 09-29-2015, 01:46 PM   #2
camorri
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Have a look in /usr/share/fonts. You should see several other directories; such as TTF and 100DPI. Those are just examples. You can copy a font file to the appropriate directory; ture type fonts to TTF for example.

As for the copying, yes copy them to a USB thumb drive, and put that drive on your linux system. I don't run Mint, so I don't know if the user can mount the thumb drive or not. The linux way is for the root user to mount the drive, to a mount point ( that is an empty directory ) with the mount command.

Some systems have 'automount' set up, so all the user does is click on the drive when it shows up on the desktop.

Possibly a Mint user can chime in and tell you how to mount a thumb drive. You could also look at Mint doc to find out how, or just google it.

Hope this helps.
 
Old 09-29-2015, 06:39 PM   #3
ArtKautz
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Unfortunately doing that requires using the terminal and I'm not that good at the command line yet. I guess it will have to wait.

Thanks.
Art
 
Old 09-29-2015, 07:40 PM   #4
yancek
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Open the file manager when booted into Mint. Go to the /media/user directory (replace user with whatever your user name is). Plug in the flash drive and you should see a new mount point, referred to as a directory. That would be the standard method to access a flash drive in Mint.
 
Old 09-29-2015, 09:23 PM   #5
ArtKautz
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Getting to the files on the flash drive isn't the problem. I drill down to /usr/share/fonts/truetype via the file manager and then try to copy the contents of the flash drive into Fonts and paste is not an option.

So I tried terminal, just to get there;
su root
entered the password.
cd //
ls
got a list of the directories, usr is there.
cd /usr
ls
the directories are listed, including one called share.
cd /share
bash: cd: /share: No such file or directory

Yup, that worked well, it won't even let root in there! I musta missed sumthin'.


Update:

I did the only reasonable thing - went to YouTube and watched a three-minute video and got a one liner command that downloaded and installed the Microsoft core fonts from what appeared to be Source Forge. It worked.
The line of text is:
sudo apt-get install ttf-mscorefonts-installer

Also see Astrogeek's quick guide to gettin' around below - very nice!

Last edited by ArtKautz; 09-30-2015 at 09:32 AM.
 
Old 09-29-2015, 11:46 PM   #6
yancek
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Quote:
cd /share
You don't want the forward slash before share if you are already in the /usr directory. From the /usr directory, try cd share/ or just do: cd /usr/share/fonts

Last edited by yancek; 09-29-2015 at 11:48 PM.
 
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Old 09-29-2015, 11:49 PM   #7
ardvark71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArtKautz View Post
One PC is running Windows 7. The other is running Linux Mint 17.2. This is NOT a dual boot setup. Is it possible to put either a folder or files from the Windows PC onto a flash drive and then add it somehow (I have no idea where the Linux machine stores the fonts it uses) to the Linux machine?
Hi...

Unless the fonts are free of any copyright, EULA or licensing issues, I wouldn't try to copy them over.

Regards...
 
Old 09-30-2015, 12:10 AM   #8
astrogeek
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As yancek says, do not add the leading slash for cd share.

Learn one rule and one shortcut for shell (terminal) navigation and it becomes easy:

First, there are two ways to specify paths: Absolute and relative.

Absolute paths always begin with the forward slash, '/' and that means they begin at the system root directory. So ls -1 / (ell-ess dash-one) gives you something like this...

Code:
ls -1 /
bin/
boot/
dev/
etc/
home/
...
tmp/
usr/
var/
Relative paths always start at the current working directory and never include the leading slash. You can see the current working directory by using the pwd command (print working directory). So...

Code:
cd /usr

pwd
/usr

ls -1
... (shows directories)

cd share/
pwd
/usr/share
Next, the shortcut. Assuming you are using the bash shell (probably are), you don't have to type the full path. The shell auto-completion will do that for you. This is easier and much less error prone when typing long paths.

This works by typing the first couple of characters of the path and hitting the tab key. When you hit the tab key the shell will complete as much of the path as is possible without being ambiguous. On most systems, if there is more than one match to what you typed it will show you a short list of all that match (some configurations require you to hit tab a second time to see the list).

So, you might try something like this...

Code:
cd /u <TAB>
(auto-completes to /usr/)
sh <TAB>
(auto-completes to /usr/share/)
fo <TAB>
(auto-completes to /usr/share/fonts/)
tr <TAB>
/usr/share/fonts/truetype/
<ENTER>

pwd
/usr/share/fonts/truetype
Very simple - just remember absolute and relative addressing, and use auto-completion to make it fast and error free!

And personally, I wouldn't worry about any licensing if you own both computers. You are taking nothing from anyone and only using what you already have - it is yours and you need no permission from anyone.

Last edited by astrogeek; 09-30-2015 at 01:01 AM. Reason: typos, hilighting, personally...
 
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Old 09-30-2015, 12:48 AM   #9
ardvark71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by astrogeek View Post
And I wouldn't worry about any licensing if you own both computers. You are taking nothing from anyone and only using what you already have - it is yours and you need no permission from anyone.
Not necessarily. I think it really depends how a particular font is licensed. See here as an example.

Regards...
 
Old 09-30-2015, 09:42 AM   #10
ArtKautz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yancek View Post
You don't want the forward slash before share if you are already in the /usr directory. From the /usr directory, try cd share/ or just do: cd /usr/share/fonts
Yea, I gotta work on my command line disability! Thanks.
 
  


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