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Old 08-30-2007, 12:26 AM   #1
tbone352
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Registered: Aug 2007
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Win user trying to make sense of Linux


Hi guys,
I am trying to convert to Linux, but I am trying to make the switch slowly. Can you guys help me with the transition?
I have always used windows(I didn't know any better!!) So I am used to icons, I think you guys call it a GUI.
OK, here are the questions:
What Flavor or distro or whatever of Linux is closest to windows? I am using Linux XP but I need to activate it soon. Not impressed and I thought Linux was free.
Is there a Linux version of setup.exe or install.exe?
What is a .bin file?
What kind of files are executable(as in installing)?
Why doesn't Linux XP have any games?
How can I install games on Linux XP?
Why does hillary keep putting her UGLY mug on tv?(ok wrong thread, sorry)
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
I have tried to do the research myself but after a while I find myself sitting in the corner counting my toes. Too much input!
 
Old 08-30-2007, 02:42 AM   #2
rkelsen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tbone352 View Post
Can you guys help me with the transition?
We can try.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbone352 View Post
I have always used windows(I didn't know any better!!) So I am used to icons, I think you guys call it a GUI.
Doesn't everybody?
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbone352 View Post
What Flavor or distro or whatever of Linux is closest to windows?
If, by that question you mean, "which Linux distro is best for me?" Nobody can answer that for you. However, having said that, there are a couple of Linux distribution choosers on the internet. Run a Google search to find one.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbone352 View Post
I am using Linux XP but I need to activate it soon. Not impressed and I thought Linux was free.
Sounds odd to me. I'd try another distro.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbone352 View Post
Is there a Linux version of setup.exe or install.exe?
Nope.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbone352 View Post
What is a .bin file?
A binary file.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbone352 View Post
What kind of files are executable(as in installing)?
Binaries are generally executable under Linux. There are also a couple of different types of scripts. Not sure what you mean with the "installing" bit. Linux distros have something called "package management," which Windows doesn't have. The names (and abilities) of package managers vary widely. Choice, choice, choice!
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbone352 View Post
Why doesn't Linux XP have any games? How can I install games on Linux XP?
I don't know. Try a better distro.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbone352 View Post
Why does hillary keep putting her UGLY mug on tv?(ok wrong thread, sorry)
I don't know. Here is what the rest of the world thinks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbone352 View Post
I have tried to do the research myself but after a while I find myself sitting in the corner counting my toes. Too much input!
At first, all of the choices and freedoms of the free software/open source world can be overwhelming. At least you have the option of working out what works best for you.

Have fun!

Last edited by rkelsen; 08-30-2007 at 02:47 AM.
 
Old 08-30-2007, 03:16 AM   #3
Bruce Hill
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I'll offer two links to add to rkelsen's reply, and not answer any of the questions per se ...

Linux != Windows

If you got your head around that one, start here:

Introduction to Linux: A Hands on Guide

My comment: Linux does not compare to Windows, and the closer a Linux distribution is to Windows, the less useful it is. If you want to use Linux, get Slackware, since it's the oldest Linux distribution, and very standard. It is designed to be what Windows is not -- stable, secure, and efficient.

Then start with that second link and learn. Read some good books about BASH and learn. The more you learn, the more you'll be able to wean yourself off of that "think with your index finger" poorly coded software called Windoze.


Let me please add, that when you need a search engine for Linux, use <Linux> Google. Everything you wanted to know about Linux, but couldn't find searching Google which didn't filter out the Windoze trash.

Last edited by Bruce Hill; 08-30-2007 at 03:20 AM. Reason: added the search engine
 
Old 08-30-2007, 04:06 AM   #4
SilentSam
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If you are new to linux, here are some basics:

Installing programs on Linux requires either package management or compiling from source (which is generally much more difficult). Coming from a windows background, you most definitely want a package manager: One which will resolve dependencies will save you a LOT of time installing programs. Packages from one distribution generally do not work on another distribution without a lot of tinkering (just as hard as installing from source). I find that Debian packages usually cause less dependency issues, as RPM packages have many different non-compatible formats.

Although there are many, many different distributions, you will see similarity in their appearances, which is because they use common Desktop Environments. The main DEs are XFCE, Gnome, and KDE (There are also a lot of other Window Managers that I won't get into). KDE usually is called the most Windows-like in it's presentation, but I recommend researching each a little to see what you like.

I found the easiest KDE distributions to use were: Kubuntu, Mepis, PCLinuxOS, OpenSUSE, and Linux Mint. Each has it's nuances... check them out. Cheers,

Dan
 
Old 08-30-2007, 08:42 AM   #5
pnellesen
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FWIW (not much), I'd recommend OpenSuSe for a newbie - I've had really good luck installing it on a couple newer laptops, and on a pretty new desktop as well (my server is Slackware all the way, however ) As the previous posters have said, Linux is NOT Windows. There are a number of filesystem and gui concepts you'll need to get a good handle on before you get really comfortable with it (I speak from my own experience in moving from Windows to Linux.) "Mounting", "Window Manager", "Package Management" are just a few of the biggies. However, if you can get over the initial learning curve (the steep part) you won't regret it. Any of the links the previous posters have supplied would be good places to start.

Good Luck!
 
Old 08-30-2007, 09:32 AM   #6
AtomicAmish
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Slackware is the best IMO, but I've been using Linux for 2 years. I'm not sure I would have had the same opinion 2 years ago.

Earlier this year I played around with PCLinuxOS and was very impressed. It's designed to be a Windows replacement. If you've been the average Windows user who doesn't like the command line, PCLOS will allow you to gradually learn it but you can still be completely GUI if you want.

You will learn more with Slackware, but there is also more danger that you will go back to Windows in frustration.

Two years ago, my first distro was SUSE. Compared to my experience with Fedora and Slackware, I didn't learn much but I can't say I'm sorry I started with it. Much of what you need to learn in the beginning is simply what applications to use for which tasks, as well as which desktop environment you prefer - Gnome, KDE, xfce, or another.
 
Old 08-30-2007, 09:40 AM   #7
colucix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tbone352 View Post
I am using Linux XP but I need to activate it soon.
I have just looked at their site: it looks like a joke, but I'm afraid they are serious...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linux_XP_site
Be warned: no boring “Linux evangelic” stuff will be here.
...terribly serious!

tbone352, you have not to pay a cent for a Linux distribution you are going to download (except for some Enterprise editions which offer support and other stuff). Also consider to use a LiveCD or LiveDVD (many distros have this choice) to test and feel confident about a completely new (and hopefully friendly) environment. A LiveCD is a Linux system which boots directly from the CD without installing anything on the hard disk: when you eject the CD the machine will be exactly as you've left before. Good luck!
 
Old 08-30-2007, 10:05 AM   #8
pixellany
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I think your questions have been well covered. The "getting started" link below might also be useful.
 
Old 08-30-2007, 10:26 AM   #9
rickh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen
I only it could be true ... Ron Paul leading the pack 2-1.
 
Old 08-30-2007, 08:41 PM   #10
ocavid
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http://www.pclinuxos.org would be a good choice.
 
Old 08-30-2007, 09:14 PM   #11
Julix
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I would recommend Kubuntu

Hi tbone352,

I would recommend to try Kubuntu. You can can boot it from CD-ROM without having to install it. The GUI is somehow similar to Windows but you should also get a look to some manual about the command line.

Regards,
JuliX
 
Old 08-31-2007, 12:08 AM   #12
rkelsen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rickh View Post
I only it could be true ... Ron Paul leading the pack 2-1.
Almost... But if you want to know what the rest of the world thinks, you should deduct the votes originating from the US.
 
Old 08-31-2007, 02:56 AM   #13
dark_angel
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If you're really serious about learning linux, i recommend you go with slackware. i have tried various distros (most of them with impressive gui installations) before slackware. after a month, i would find myself at the same spot where i started. learning with slackware is probably a more steeper climb than with other distros but it's the most rewarding so far.

For beginners like us, i recommend trying the slax live CD first. its a linux live CD that is based on slackware and it's free. the gui is pretty impressive. check it out at this site http://www.slax.org.

If you're already comfortable with slax and wanted to proceed with the bigger game, download the slackware's installation CDs at http://www.slackware.org/getslack/. There are 6 CDs total but you only need the first 3 CDs for the installation (actually you dont need the 3rd cd if you're not planning to install KDEi). Before installing, you should have a copy of their manual "Slackware Linux Essentials" (can be downloaded at the same site for free) to guide you in case you have some questions since the installation procedures maybe tough for us beginners. The slackware installation process maybe a bit archaic compared with other distros, but it's very simple and hassle free (that is, if you read the manual).

After you reboot from the installation process, you'll find yourself in unfamiliar grounds. You'll be given a console login instead of a GUI login. Login as root, create a new user with the command "adduser", logout of root, login back with the newly created user, and then enter the command "startx". After this, you're now in a familiar GUI environent. Then start exploring. But remember, the most useful tools are not available in the GUI. They are console commands buried underneath the GUI environment. Your first priority is to find them and familiarize them. Always have the manual beside you everytime you explore the system. I recommend finishing the Slackware manual before reading other stuff. Another useful book is the "Introduction to Linux: A hands on guide" which was introduced to you earlier. Read, read, read, and learn.

Happy slacking!
 
Old 08-31-2007, 01:58 PM   #14
scheidel21
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Heck I'll throw in my 2 cents, for what it's worth. I recommend Debian, unless you are running cutting pretty new hardware, the I suggest Ubuntu or Kubuntu. These are debian based distrobutions. The Debian package manager is a pretty easy thing to use even from a command line interface. You want something you type apt-get install nameofsoftware package and it gets installed and configured for you. If you are in a GUI there are many front end installers for the package system on debian like synaptic. This makes it even easier, you just click a checkbox and install software. Be warned though there are good and bad aspects to linux software. Good -- There are thousands of things out there almost overwhelming but there is choice, and if it's not there you can download source code and compile it. Bad -- you can;t just download a .exe and install something like in windows. Good luck.
 
Old 08-31-2007, 04:29 PM   #15
oskar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen View Post
What the hell! It's been Ralph Nader Hands down for every election I followed. Who in his right mind would vote for anyone else?
 
  


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