LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 05-05-2007, 01:56 AM   #1
GregAllen
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Posts: 6

Rep: Reputation: 0
Will some kind geek please hold my hand?


For twenty years, I was the geek my friends called when their MS box crashed. I'm totally new to Linux and now I need some hand holding.

Please don't chide me and say, "Google it, lazy newbie" I've purchased/read a book on Linux and spend HOURS reading on-line stuff.

But, there is so much jargon that I can't even get a toe hold.

Question 1:

"How do I learn if a program is installed correctly and what directory it's in?"

For example, I'm trying to get my PCMCIA WiFi card running -- I installed ModWifi (downloaded a RMP at ModWifi.org) and got a message it was installed but now I see no sign of it anywhere. (It don't see it in "etc" or "bin")

What the heck do I do now?

This isn't the first time this has happened -- a program seems to install correctly but then I can find no signs of it. I have no idea how to find it, run it, test it or even verify that it exists on my system.

I need this basic skill. Please help!

I've helped countless people with computers, I'm hoping that good karma gets me a little payback here.

PS: I am running SuSE 10.1 (with Gnome) on an old ThinkPad.
 
Old 05-05-2007, 02:43 AM   #2
jay73
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Location: Belgium
Distribution: Ubuntu 11.04, Debian testing
Posts: 5,019

Rep: Reputation: 130Reputation: 130
Hi,

Sorry to hear that, I hope that I can be of some assistance.

As a rule, finding packages on a Linux system is pretty easy but unfortunately, Suse is a bit of an exception. One way of finding out about packages is going into System > Administration > Yast > Software management and searching the list. You should be able to type the name of the package into a search box; it will greatly reduce the searching.
Now, on most systems, nothing could be easier than finding a package by using the command line. I know, the whole idea of using a command line sounds like a nightmare and a waste of time to many people who are new to Linux but it really isn't. If you open up a terminal in the average RPM based Linux and type:

su -
[root password]
rpm -q ModWifi

it should return the exact location where the package was installed. But as I said, Suse is a bit of an exception and there are quite a few ways in which it differs from other RPM based distros. I would say, give the rpm -q a try but I'm not sure whether it will work.
 
Old 05-05-2007, 03:13 AM   #3
syg00
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Australia
Distribution: Lots ...
Posts: 14,839

Rep: Reputation: 1822Reputation: 1822Reputation: 1822Reputation: 1822Reputation: 1822Reputation: 1822Reputation: 1822Reputation: 1822Reputation: 1822Reputation: 1822Reputation: 1822
To find a program, try "which <program>", and "locate <program>" can also be useful, but will generate more hits. "apropos <program>" will search the manpages for references.
Ah yes - manpages. Manpages are the help files: "man <something>".
Maybe start with "man man".
 
Old 05-05-2007, 03:22 AM   #4
jschiwal
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Aug 2001
Location: Fargo, ND
Distribution: SuSE AMD64
Posts: 15,733

Rep: Reputation: 670Reputation: 670Reputation: 670Reputation: 670Reputation: 670Reputation: 670
For an rpm based system, you can run:
rpm -ql packagename

This will list the locations of all of the files installed by the package.

If you want to examine an rpm package that isn't installed, you can run:
rpm -qlp full-package-name.rpm
After the "p" option list the full name of the rpm file itself. (Hint: it is easier getting the filename correct if you press the tab key to use auto completion)

Installing a package will probably install at least a README file in /usr/share/doc/packages/<packagename>/. For Samba, it will install three pdf books there, that are the same as the Samba 3 books you can buy in Barnes & Noble.

Some packages will install libraries or daemons that run in the background, so you won't see any sign of them in the menu. For utility type programs, be sure to read the documentation that it installed including any README or INSTALL files. For example, a similar package, that you will probably need is wpa_supplicant. In the /usr/share/doc/packages/wpa_supplicant/ directory is a README file that contains sample configurations for different situations.

Also, if it is a 3rd party package, be sure to read their documentation on the same website. Many projects will have there own wiki, so googling for the terms: "<package-name> wiki" might provide you with a link to the wiki.


By the way, did you mean madwifi?

Last edited by jschiwal; 05-05-2007 at 03:24 AM.
 
Old 05-06-2007, 01:22 AM   #5
GregAllen
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Posts: 6

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by jay73
Hi,

Sorry to hear that, I hope that I can be of some assistance.

su -
[root password]
rpm -q ModWifi
Thanks! I see that it is not installed.

Hmmm. That's strange because I got a clear message from SuSE that is WAS installed. Still -- VERY HELPFUL because now I know what do to next!

Thanks for the help. SuSE was not my first choice, BTW, but when I tried to install Ubuntu on the ThinkPad, it aborted with a scary message about demaging the EPROM. SuSE also has a specific RPM/programs for the ThinkPad which, I assume, are useful.
 
Old 05-06-2007, 01:30 AM   #6
GregAllen
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Posts: 6

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by syg00
To find a program, try "which <program>", and "locate <program>" can also be useful, but will generate more hits. "apropos <program>" will search the manpages for references.
Ah yes - manpages. Manpages are the help files: "man <something>".
Maybe start with "man man".

Thanks for the "man" tip. I'll definitely use that one.

<which> gave me no return and <locate> is not a command on SuSE.
 
Old 05-06-2007, 01:40 AM   #7
GregAllen
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Posts: 6

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by jschiwal

If you want to examine an rpm package that isn't installed, you can run:
rpm -qlp full-package-name.rpm
After the "p" option list the full name of the rpm file itself. (Hint: it is easier getting the filename correct if you press the tab key to use auto completion)

Installing a package will probably install at least a README file in /usr/share/doc/packages/<packagename>/. For Samba, it will install three pdf books there, that are the same as the Samba 3 books you can buy in Barnes & Noble.
Thanks for the tip -- I found the MadWifi manual!

OH MAN! I see now that I was typing mixed case and and the real name is all lower case!

It IS installed, afterall! Newbie mistake, I'm sure!

But a learning experience. I'll play with it and surely I'll post another request for hand holding.

THANKS EVERYBODY!
 
Old 05-06-2007, 01:40 AM   #8
jay73
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Location: Belgium
Distribution: Ubuntu 11.04, Debian testing
Posts: 5,019

Rep: Reputation: 130Reputation: 130
Hi,

One reason why you may get the impression that the package was not (properly) installed is that you may have used the wrong package name. As someone pointed out above, the package you are referring to is probably modwifi, not madwifi. It that is correct, Suse is not going to jump in and correct this. So always make sure you get the name 100% right (it is even case-sensitive!). If you are sure the spelling was right, then obviously, it is not installed and you should start over.

Edit: OK, I see everything is going fine. Ignore all that I said.
 
Old 05-06-2007, 02:00 AM   #9
GregAllen
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Posts: 6

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
SECOND NEWBIE QUESTION (TWO PARTER)

How do I run a program there is no menu item or icon for it?

I have found the "Run Application" box but when I type in "madwifi" it tells me there is no madwifi at file://madwifi.

I assume that's because that's not where the program is. So...

How do I find a directory?

When I ran the rpm -ql command I got this result:
Quote:
/usr/bin/80211debug
/usr/bin/80211stats
/usr/bin/athchans
/usr/bin/athctrl
/usr/bin/athdebug
/usr/bin/athkey
/usr/bin/athstats
Is it just trial and error? Or can I somehow determine which directory has the program in it?

Thanks for your patient help, guys.
 
Old 05-06-2007, 02:52 AM   #10
jay73
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Location: Belgium
Distribution: Ubuntu 11.04, Debian testing
Posts: 5,019

Rep: Reputation: 130Reputation: 130
Are you sure you need to run anything? Or are you just mixing up XP with Linux, thinking that you now need to do something like execute a .exe file? The thing is: rpm -ivh is the equivalent of .exe - so your madwifi is already installed and fully functional - that's all there is to do as far as installing goes (assuming it was installed correctly, of course). Now you may still need to do some configuration but that's a different story.

Last edited by jay73; 05-06-2007 at 02:54 AM.
 
Old 05-06-2007, 11:51 AM   #11
GregAllen
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Posts: 6

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by jay73
Hi,

One reason why you may get the impression that the package was not (properly) installed is that you may have used the wrong package name. said.

Jay,

You are right, actually. But my mistake was using the wrong case -- "MadWifi" when the correct usage is "madwifi". In my defense, it is spelled MadWifi in almost all the documentation.

I was a big DOS guy and I think that made me lazy since case doesn't matter. Also, I can't type very well.

By the way, MadWifi stands for "Multiband Atheros Driver for Wireless Fidelity"

Greg
 
Old 05-06-2007, 12:20 PM   #12
jaykup
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Mukwonago, WI
Distribution: Slackware 12
Posts: 77

Rep: Reputation: 16
Welcome to linux! You've made a wise choice!

A small crash course ---

You need PCMCIA WIFI, so you get the rpm package and install it. Linux, like windows, uses a PATH where it will look to see if the program you have specified is in there. PATH will contain directories like /usr/bin /bin /usr/local/bin etc. PATH is a system wide variable, so you can see what it equals by typing
Code:
echo $PATH
. In bash (your shell language) a variable is defined by
Code:
variable="a new string, or an integer"
and called like we have before, with a $ in front.

EVERYTHING in linux is case sensitive, as you may have already found out. Path and PATH are two different variables.

So when "madwifi" is entered in the console, it searches those PATH's only, and if it finds it, will execute it. If you get an error "cannot find", more than likely it was not installed to a PATH. By default, an RPM will install to a PATH. Lets say that you just extract an archive, and see an executable file. You can run it by doing a ./thefile so bash knows where it is, and how to run it. . is the current directory, then / to separate the file from the directory, and the actual file name. This can also be /home/user/program. Same thing.

Now its installed right? You want to find out where. Two commands will help you there.

Code:
which madwifi
Will return the first occurrence of "madwifi" in the several PATH directories.

and

Code:
whereis madwifi
Will return where it is installed, which library directories its using, where the man pages are, etc etc.

Quote:
How do I run a program there is no menu item or icon for it?
You can run any program from the console. The GUI does the same thing, only attaches a window or icon to it. Say I want to load up firefox, but I don't see a icon or anything in my "start menu".

Typing firefox in the terminal will do it. But what if I install something that I don't know what the exact program name is? When I install openoffice, I had no idea what its exec was called. Using Google to find the answer is one way, or we can try to find it for ourselves. I know it probably starts with open, so I open my trusty terminal, and type in open. Before you hit enter, hit tab twice. I love this. It will show you all the commands or programs that start with open.

Code:
root@digital:~# open
openal-config                    openoffice.org-2.1               openssl
openjade                         openoffice.org-2.1-printeradmin  openvt
root@digital:~# open
Looks like I found it. Tab cannot go any farther because there are several things that start with open, and the next char is different. If I type openof <tab> it will complete the openoffice.org-2.1 for me. This works with directories too. Play around with it!

Lastly, to find a specific directory or program (like windows search) you have two options.

Code:
find /home/username -name "*.mp3"
Will find everything in /home/username that contains ANYTHING.mp3

Code:
slocate "*.mp3"
Does the same thing, but searches in a database of all your files (if this is set up). Its like the indexing feature on Windows.

Last edited by jaykup; 06-19-2011 at 09:06 AM.
 
Old 05-06-2007, 12:42 PM   #13
rickh
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Albuquerque, NM USA
Distribution: Debian-Lenny/Sid 32/64 Desktop: Generic AMD64-EVGA 680i Laptop: Generic Intel SIS-AC97
Posts: 4,250

Rep: Reputation: 61
You might find a quick scan of the Linux File Hierarchy to be useful.

One of the hardest adaptations for Windows "experts" is the concept that Linux is a completely different theory in Operating Systems. Your Windows knowledge tends, often, to interfere with Linux learning rather than enhance it.
 
Old 05-07-2007, 08:27 AM   #14
AnanthaP
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: Chennai, India
Distribution: UBUNTU 5.10 since Jul-18,2006 on Intel 820 DC
Posts: 805

Rep: Reputation: 186Reputation: 186
In general, the tldp site mentioned above points to a lot of good stuff. They have on most topics like:

intro-linux,
Bash-Beginners-Guide
sag (systems administrators guide - necessary for a single machine also)

and many more. All in HTML, downloadable HTML (single file) and PDF.

HTH

End
 
Old 05-09-2007, 02:01 PM   #15
dickgregory
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2002
Location: Houston
Distribution: Arch, PCLinuxOS, Mint
Posts: 257

Rep: Reputation: 34
Another way I sometimes find things is to use the features of my gui package manager. They will usually have a button or tab that will show you what files are installed with a package.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
A newbie ready to hold hand and walk mayankseth LinuxQuestions.org Member Intro 3 10-13-2006 05:47 PM
Could someone please hold my hand while I recompile wine? DA WEED WIZARD Linux - Newbie 5 03-31-2006 04:17 PM
Hold my hand while I setup my ADSL. cmack Linux - Networking 1 08-06-2003 04:18 AM
Set Up School Network From Scratch - Need Advice. Someone Hold My Hand! norisoft Linux - Newbie 7 06-13-2003 04:40 AM
somebody hold my hand through this, kazaalite install the anti-riced Linux - Software 1 05-26-2003 04:08 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:23 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration