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Old 07-14-2006, 09:16 PM   #16
johnson_steve
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Registered: Apr 2005
Location: BrewCity, USA (Milwaukee, WI)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottyp
Although, my only computer with a cd burner now has slack on it. I guess I'll have to install windows on it again, download and burn the ISOs, and install.
I don't know why nobody said this yet but ubuntu will ship you a cd free they even pay the shipping.

https://shipit.ubuntu.com/
 
Old 07-14-2006, 10:04 PM   #17
Dragineez
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Truer Words Were Never Spoken

Quote:
Originally Posted by scottyp
I guess I was overconfident 'cuz I work in the IT field, and I seem to think I kinda know what I'm doing. I guess when it comes to linux, I don't, and will just have to learn.
I too thought my 20+ years of IT experience would make it easy. I too was wrong. But then I read this "Linux Is Not Windows", and my eyes were opened.
 
Old 07-14-2006, 10:33 PM   #18
nadroj
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scottyp, stick with slackware. you dont want to install a new distro everytime you encounter a problem.

Quote:
I would like to view the internet on my computer.
what network card do you have? ie, post the output of the 'lspci | grep Ethernet' command. you may need to run 'su' before running the lspci command though, supplying the 'root' user password.
also are you using a router on your network, or does the computer go straight to a cable/dsl modem? assuming this is broadband..

and as another user has suggested, search google for the 'slack book' and keep it handy, its a great reference for anyone (beginner to advanced)

Quote:
I don't have any sound
post the output of 'lspci | grep Multimedia'.

also post the output of 'lsmod'

Last edited by nadroj; 07-14-2006 at 10:34 PM.
 
Old 07-14-2006, 11:07 PM   #19
greengrocer
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Distribution: Ubuntu Intrepid and Meerkat, formerly used Debian 3.1 (Sarge) with Gnome Desktop
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When I first started with Linux, I asked a few people who had been using Linux fo a while for advice on which distro to choose.

I was recommended Ubuntu because its the most user friendly, however If I wanted a moderate challenge, I was recommended to try Debian 3.1


So I installed Debian 3.1 and learned how to do a lot of stuff very quickly.

Eventually I started building Linux based PC's for my friends. All of those PC's I have built are running Ubuntu because Ubuntu is near perfect from a support perspective.

After working with Debian 3.1, I can really appreciate the work that has gone into Ubuntu.

If you want a Linux distro that has an X-Windows interface ready to go after you install the distro off the CD, then Ubuntu is one of many that will suit ideal.

I started with Debian 3.1, and Debian 3.1 does not install X-Windows interface ready to go, you have to install the software yourself (though it wasn't that difficult).

So if you want a moderate challenge, try Debian for a few months, unless you want to frig around with Kernals, I know you will end up using Ubuntu fairly soon after (Debain 3.1 has 2.4 kernal by default, Ubuntu has 2.6 kernal)


One other point, Don't try and be a hero with Linux on your first try with it, you will probably only end up getting un-neccessarilly frustrated with it and hating Linux. Start with an easier distro stick with that for 6 months ( you will learn a lot even when you start installing multimeida apss etc) and when you comfortable, then try a more difficult distro).

Last edited by greengrocer; 07-15-2006 at 01:17 AM.
 
Old 07-15-2006, 12:26 AM   #20
haertig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottyp
I guess I was overconfident 'cuz I work in the IT field, and I seem to think I kinda know what I'm doing. I guess when it comes to linux, I don't, and will just have to learn.
Truer words could not be spoken. Especially if your IT experience is with Windows. I came to Linux with about 20 years of Unix experience (as an app developer, not a sysadmin, although over the course of a few decades you pick up some sysadmin knowledge along the way). I was also the resident Windows pseudo-guru.

Linux was no easy walk in the park for me at first. You'd think all that Unix experience would help. And it does - you just might not realize it at first. I felt like a total computer idiot the first month of Linux. The second month - "OK, I can work with this". The third - "Yeah, I can help YOU with that."

For a newbie, I think half of learning Linux is learning Google! The second half is learning how to ask a question so it accurately targets your problem. Also - refusing to give up and go running back to Windows-hand-holding at the first hint of confusion.

Oh yeah - by the middle of that third month, WINDOWS was the OS that felt totally alien to me! Some friend would have a problem in Windows and I would no longer grab some Windows restore disk or any of my dozens of low-level DOS tools. I'd grab a Linux LiveCD. Any one would do - Knoppix, Kanotix, Slax, Ubuntu, whatever, They were all better and felt more "normal" than the Windows tools I'd been using for years and years. Certainly more powerful.

My first Linux distro was Fedora. Easy going. Worked well. I didn't really care for it though. I kept gravitating back to Windows. Next came Debian. Quite a bit more challenging to get setup and running than Fedora. Quite a bit! But I fell in love with it and that's what I'm using now. I'm about 99% sure my next distro will be Slackware. My strong Unix background and the Linux knowledge I've gained with Debian make Slack a natural choice for me. I doubt I'll give up Debian. It's just too good IMHO. But I have lots of computers and who says they all have to run the same distro? That would be boring!
 
Old 07-15-2006, 03:49 AM   #21
TigerOC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottyp
I would like to view the internet on my computer. I have taken the plunge and installed slackware on my laptop, and so far, I don't have any sound, and I can't see the internet. AND every thing I find while searching for some answers seem to want to tell me how to set up a web server. I don't want to make a web server right now, I just wanna browse the internet. Can somebody help me out here, I can't seem to find anything that will explain stuff without assuming a prior level of knowledge about linux. Please explain as if you were talking to a 5 year old! lol

Thanks for letting me vent a little, and please help me out.

Scott
Just a quick comment about the previous posts - they are not very helpful. Telling someone that they are using the wrong distro and encouraging them to switch to fix a problem is not helping. I am Debian fan but that is my preference and the distro I am comfortable with.
Lets address the problems and then scottyp is going to start learning. The easier of the 2 problems relates to the internet connection. Please can you tell us how you are trying to connect (dialup, broadband ???) and with what type of hardware. The same really applies to your sound. What hardware does the laptop have. Most of these issues relate to drivers being used (or lack thereof) or network configuration.
The main problem faced by new users is getting your head around an evrionment where you actually have know something about the equipment you are using and the package management systems. Then getting used using generic packages that are available outside of your package management system. Depending on your IT babckground, tenacity and willingness to learn, you should be able to manage very well in a couple of months. I come from an almost identical background to haertig. I am personally of the opinion that if you have a strong IT background you should start with some of the harder distro's because you will learn quicker. The problem with the "install and run" systems is that in most instances you don't get your hands dirty. Be patient, learn to ask the correct questions and supply as much detail as you can when asking questions. If you do this you will get the right kind of help, especially here at LQ.
 
Old 07-15-2006, 04:19 AM   #22
Tinkster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottyp
Well, OK, all of you folk's advise isn't what I wanted to hear, but I guess it is what needed to know, if ya know what I mean. I will smoke this system and install this Ubuntu or something.
Don't give up on Slack just yet. I suggest you let us know what
network card you have, whether you use DHCP or not, and the
same for the sound. If you're a real geek, an IT natural, you're
SO going to dig Slack once you got the hang of it... that's some-
thing ubuntu will never offer you. If you like "under the hood" and
"getting the hands dirty", there's no better choice than Slack (well,
LFS aside, I guess).



Quote:
Originally Posted by scottyp
I guess I was overconfident 'cuz I work in the IT field, and I seem to think I kinda know what I'm doing. I guess when it comes to linux, I don't, and will just have to learn.
And it's a very healthy experience to realise ones limitations
once in a while. :} ...


Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 07-15-2006, 05:11 AM   #23
BobNutfield
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I have to disagree with most of what I read in this thread. The OP appears to want to learn Linux and Slackware is a great distro for doing that. As you can see by my profile distros, I run quite a number of varying distros and Slack was one of my first to get up and running (with enormous help from the Slackware forum, it is quite true that they are terrific in that forum).

Now that I haave some Linux experience under my belt, I am thankful that I stuck with Slackware and still find it to be the most stable of all the distros I run (no offense to any of the other distro enthusists). I started with Slackware when I was still very limited in my knowledge of Linux (I am still learning more each day). I got it up an running with all the bells and whistles (dropline gnome, xine w/codecs, networking, etc.) in about one day's worth of tweaking and probing.

I have nothing bad to say about the "click and run" distros, I use several. But learning Linux with a distro like Slackware is a GOOD thing, albeit more difficult.
I am certainly not an expert Linux user, but I would have to say that Slackware is definitly possible for a new Linux user to set up and, having successfully done so, a lot of valuable knowledge is gained along the way.

So, I believe the OP SHOULD stick with Slackware if learning Linux is the goal. In that regard, as has already been mentioned, if specific problems are posted, I sure the proper help can be provided.

Just my view

Bob
 
Old 07-15-2006, 09:31 AM   #24
Komakino
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Registered: Feb 2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nadroj
scottyp, stick with slackware. you dont want to install a new distro everytime you encounter a problem.

what network card do you have? ie, post the output of the 'lspci | grep Ethernet' command. you may need to run 'su' before running the lspci command though, supplying the 'root' user password.
also are you using a router on your network, or does the computer go straight to a cable/dsl modem? assuming this is broadband..

and as another user has suggested, search google for the 'slack book' and keep it handy, its a great reference for anyone (beginner to advanced)

post the output of 'lspci | grep Multimedia'.

also post the output of 'lsmod'
We're not suggesting he change distro every time he encounters a problem, but slackware is not a good starting distro for the reasons already given (mainly because it is out of date and ships a 2.4 kernel by default). I think your suggestion that he stick with it is bad advice, he will simply get the impression that linux needs lots of work to solve the most simple problem and will most likely get frustrated very quickly.

I used to use slackware, but recently tried ubuntu and was amazed how much stuff that had taken effort to set up on slack 'just works' (tm) on Ubuntu.
 
Old 07-15-2006, 09:33 AM   #25
Komakino
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinkster
If you're a real geek, an IT natural, you're
SO going to dig Slack once you got the hang of it... that's some-
thing ubuntu will never offer you.
Not true...I do everything on Ubuntu the 'slack' way. I don't particularly like GUI tools. But then I don't particularly like having to compile the kernel modules for my wireless card, synaptic touchpad, etc....every time I reinstall the distro. As a former slackware enthusiast I can no longer see any benefit in running it, particularly as a beginner.
 
Old 07-15-2006, 10:38 AM   #26
nadroj
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i realize ubuntu is great for beginners and out of the box compatibility, but..
what if he installs ubuntu and for some reason his NIC isnt detected and the internet connection not setup right away, then what? then he'll need to either figure it out himself, or come here posting his NIC and network information.. which i had suggested he do for slack.

in slackware it seems when you learn something you can apply it to any distro (most of the time).

and he also said that he wants to learn something, so that makes slackware a great choice as well.

just my opinions.
 
  


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