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Old 07-22-2008, 04:06 PM   #1
wuitsung
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Why different distribution using different command?


Sorry.. it'a very beginner's question. I am just wondering that all distributions are based on linux, but why when in terminal, sometimes the command are different? ex: some require sudo at the begining... Thank you
 
Old 07-22-2008, 04:12 PM   #2
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wuitsung View Post
Sorry.. it'a very beginner's question. I am just wondering that all distributions are based on linux, but why when in terminal, sometimes the command are different? ex: some require sudo at the begining... Thank you
The commands are the same; SUDO is for privilege escalation, letting you run a command as a root-level user, without having to actually log in as root. Some commands require you to be root to run them, while others don't. That's pretty 'standard' across distributions, too.

Some distros have specific commands (i.e. Yast for SuSE, up2date for RedHat, etc.), but those are the only real differences. The OS commands should be the same.
 
Old 07-22-2008, 04:21 PM   #3
reddazz
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Hi.

Most distributions use the same tools although there are slight variations. Sudo is meant to give certain users some admin privileges so that they do not run login as root. Its a very useful tool where you have multiple administrators. Some distros like Ubuntu lock the root account and give users in the admin group root privileges with sudo. This is not how most distros are setup by default.
 
Old 07-23-2008, 12:30 AM   #4
wuitsung
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Sorry I am still not very clear...So do you man when I install let's say Ubuntu, I don't have the administrator privilege? I am just a regular user? So I have to run sudo? Do you mean the default administrator account is root?
 
Old 07-23-2008, 01:15 AM   #5
pixellany
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In any distro, the root account has the highest privileges. Other users can be set up with any level of privilege.

In Ubuntu, the root account is disabled, but certain users take on root powers by using sudo. A certain amount of security is provided by asking the user to enter his/her password for each action requiring root privilege.

You can easily enable the root account in Ubuntu: Just enter "sudo passwd root". You will, however, still be asked for your regular user passwd when opening an application that requires root privileges.

Personally, I regard all this as the one major flaw in Ubuntu.
 
Old 07-23-2008, 01:21 AM   #6
Mr. C.
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The entire concept of a "distribution" is that the provider tailors the kernel and user space utilities to suit the perceived target audience. Each does what they think best. In the end, its about "different strokes for different folks".
 
Old 07-23-2008, 01:50 PM   #7
wuitsung
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Thanx! So when the first time I setup Ubuntu, the account has which privilege? administrator or just a user?
 
Old 07-23-2008, 02:47 PM   #8
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Ubuntu creates a standard user account, and encourages the use of "sudo" for command line privilege escalation, and it will prompt via GUI when necessary to run GUI commands with elevated permissions.
 
  


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