LinuxQuestions.org
Visit Jeremy's Blog.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 05-06-2011, 02:34 PM   #1
Straitsfan
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2011
Posts: 4

Rep: Reputation: 0
Smile Which version of Linux for my PC


Hello to all. I'm a novice and learning scripting and programming on my iMac, but want to install Linux on my PC (Windows is EVIL). But I don't know if there's a best version or not. What do you all recommend, and would I be able to switch back and forth between Linux and Windows when someone wants to be Bill Gates' slave

And how do I know which processor (32 bit or 64 bit, etc) do I have for the proper OS version.

And is Linux at all similar to UNIX, which is what OS X is built on?

Thanks for all your help. Any info on the various versions is greatly appreciated.
 
Old 05-06-2011, 02:40 PM   #2
tsg
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Posts: 155

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Straitsfan View Post
Hello to all. I'm a novice and learning scripting and programming on my iMac, but want to install Linux on my PC (Windows is EVIL). But I don't know if there's a best version or not. What do you all recommend, and would I be able to switch back and forth between Linux and Windows when someone wants to be Bill Gates' slave
Slackware is the best. Ask anyone

Quote:
And how do I know which processor (32 bit or 64 bit, etc) do I have for the proper OS version.
Not a Mac guy, but I'm sure someone can tell you how to find that out.

Quote:
And is Linux at all similar to UNIX, which is what OS X is built on?
Very much so.

Quote:
Thanks for all your help. Any info on the various versions is greatly appreciated.
Other version are easier to learn, but Slackware is the one to use if you really want to learn and understand Linux under the hood. It does not hold your hand, but doesn't slap it either.
 
Old 05-06-2011, 02:45 PM   #3
Arcane
Member
 
Registered: May 2006
Location: Latvia, Europe
Distribution: random
Posts: 303

Rep: Reputation: 233Reputation: 233Reputation: 233
Yes Slackware is nice or Debian or Arch..but it won't hurt if you spare some time to complete this test.
 
Old 05-06-2011, 03:32 PM   #4
tsg
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Posts: 155

Rep: Reputation: 30
For the record, the test said I was 100% match for Slackware and Gentoo.
 
Old 05-06-2011, 04:24 PM   #5
markush
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Location: Germany
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 3,979

Rep: Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850
If you really want to learn Linux, go for Slackware. It is easy to install and you will find a very helpful and knowledgeable community here at LQ: http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/

Markus
 
Old 05-06-2011, 08:59 PM   #6
MTK358
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Posts: 6,443
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 720Reputation: 720Reputation: 720Reputation: 720Reputation: 720Reputation: 720Reputation: 720
If you really want to learn Linux but still want a dependency-handling package manager (unlike Slackware), then Arch is great, too.
 
Old 05-06-2011, 11:43 PM   #7
frankbell
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Debian, Mint, OpenBSD
Posts: 11,350
Blog Entries: 12

Rep: Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731
If you ask 10 Linux users which distro to choose, you will get 15 answers. My two favorite distros are Slackware and Debian. I prefer stability over bleeding edge.

I would recommend Slackware, because it doesn't hold your hand and expects you to RTFM. Once you master Slackware, no other distro can intimidate you.

I would not recommend Arch to start with, although the instructions at the Arch wiki are very clear, because there's a longer distance between step one and working system. I certainly would not recommend Gentoo for someone new.

I would suggest you download some Live CDs and try them out, then pick the distro that feels most comfortable for you. For Slackware, there is no official Live CD, but Slax is a Live CD based on Slackware.
 
Old 05-07-2011, 03:50 AM   #8
markush
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Location: Germany
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 3,979

Rep: Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankbell View Post
If you ask 10 Linux users which distro to choose, you will get 15 answers...
Yes! here at LQ, 8 for Slackware and 7 for Ubuntu
Quote:
...I would recommend Slackware, because it doesn't hold your hand and expects you to RTFM. Once you master Slackware, no other distro can intimidate you...
yes, and that't the reason why people say if you learn any distro you learn that distro, but if you learn Slackware you learn Linux.
Quote:
...I would not recommend Arch to start with, although the instructions at the Arch wiki are very clear, because there's a longer distance between step one and working system. I certainly would not recommend Gentoo for someone new...
I agree, but as is said both Gentoo and Arch have excellent documentations in their Wikis. I'd recommend to read in this documentations even if one has not installed the distribution.
Quote:
...I would suggest you download some Live CDs and try them out, then pick the distro that feels most comfortable for you. For Slackware, there is no official Live CD, but Slax is a Live CD based on Slackware.
There's a successor for Slax which is called Porteus http://porteus.org/, it comes even with a 64bit version and KDE4.

Markus
 
Old 05-07-2011, 11:58 AM   #9
Straitsfan
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2011
Posts: 4

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
When I wanted to knew the processer type, I meant for my PC not my Mac.
 
Old 05-07-2011, 01:31 PM   #10
markush
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Location: Germany
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 3,979

Rep: Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850
Quote:
Originally Posted by Straitsfan View Post
...And how do I know which processor (32 bit or 64 bit, etc) do I have for the proper OS version...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Straitsfan
When I wanted to knew the processer type, I meant for my PC not my Mac.
when you have a Linux-system running on the machine, for example as a live-CD (32bit will run always, even on 64bit systems) you can execute the command
Code:
uname -a
in a terminal and post the output here, then we'll see which processor it is.

Markus
 
Old 05-07-2011, 01:31 PM   #11
Wim Sturkenboom
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Roodepoort, South Africa
Distribution: Slackware 10.1/10.2/12, Ubuntu 12.04, Crunchbang Statler
Posts: 3,786

Rep: Reputation: 282Reputation: 282Reputation: 282
If I'm not mistaken and you still have windows installed, right click 'my computer',goto properties and check the processor.

But 32-bit versions of Linux are OK to use on 64-bit processors, so just get a 32-bit version.
 
Old 05-07-2011, 06:50 PM   #12
RockDoctor
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: Minnesota, US
Distribution: Fedora, Linux Mint, Ubuntu
Posts: 1,506

Rep: Reputation: 325Reputation: 325Reputation: 325Reputation: 325
Hey, I'll put in a plug for Fedora. Easy installation, bleeding edge, and enough breakage (especially when running Rawhide) to keep things interesting. I suppose, to be fair, I should put in plugs for Puppy and Ubuntu, as I run them too. If I wanted stability, I'd go for CentOS or Debian. Nothing against Arch, Crunchbang, Gentoo, Knoppix, Mandriva, Mepis, Mint, PCLinuxOS, Slack, SliTaz, Suse, TinyCore, and Zenwalk; I've tried them but just don't use them.
 
Old 05-07-2011, 09:31 PM   #13
frankbell
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Debian, Mint, OpenBSD
Posts: 11,350
Blog Entries: 12

Rep: Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731Reputation: 2731
Quote:
Originally Posted by markush View Post
There's a successor for Slax which is called Porteus http://porteus.org/, it comes even with a 64bit version and KDE4.
Thanks. I'll take a look at it.
 
Old 05-07-2011, 10:12 PM   #14
hf2046
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Distribution: Slack64
Posts: 111

Rep: Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Straitsfan View Post
And how do I know which processor (32 bit or 64 bit, etc) do I have for the proper OS version.
Try this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X86-64
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Which LXDE version of Linux has the newest version of Firefox and Open Office? coolguy2008 Linux - Newbie 6 09-19-2010 01:04 PM
[SOLVED] MinGW - performance is degarding from linux version to win32 version manu-tm Programming 5 07-20-2009 10:17 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:26 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration