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Old 05-04-2015, 06:23 PM   #1
a2326
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Which rolling releases can be recommended?


Hello,
I tried Linux Mint Debian Edition, but it was not very stable. Are there any stable rolling releases that can be recommended? Thanks.
 
Old 05-04-2015, 07:46 PM   #2
BeaStiE35
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yep !!! >>> LMDE 2
 
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Old 05-04-2015, 09:01 PM   #3
maples
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I use Arch, and I usually have no problems.

I've only seen one "unstable" thing since I started using Arch about a year ago. Every now and then, they need to re-do a few packages to the point that you have to completely uninstall them (and any programs that depend on them) before you can install the new packages, but that only happens every few months and can usually be fixed in about 10 minutes.

Other than that, I've had no problems at all. They say that you should be cautious about updating, but I never have issues.

Hope this helps!

EDIT: No rolling-release distro is going to be "stable." The nature of a rolling-release system means that it's constantly being updated with cutting-edge versions of everything, and since it's brand-new it's relatively untested, which means that there's a fairly high probability that there are undiscovered bugs somewhere.

Last edited by maples; 05-04-2015 at 09:03 PM.
 
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Old 05-05-2015, 03:24 AM   #4
Head_on_a_Stick
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Rolling release != Stable by definition...

However, I have been using Arch for 15 months now with no problems at all.

Even if there are problems with Arch packages, usually just downgrading the package solves the problem.
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php...ading_packages

Even an unbootable system isn't a major problem 'cos you have to chroot into an unbootable Arch system and install the bootloader as part of the installation process so you already know how to fix it...
 
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Old 05-05-2015, 04:30 AM   #5
beachboy2
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a2326,

Yet another recommendation for Arch as a rolling release.

You will also learn a lot about the underlying system by installing Arch.

Have a look at post #3 here:

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...es-4175540082/

Note that Tutorial 1 is updated monthly.

I found this guide extremely helpful and reassuring, in conjunction with the two official Arch guides.

Also make sure that you are familiar with the nano text editor because you will be using it a lot!

http://www.raspberry-pi-geek.com/how...-Editor-Basics

http://mintaka.sdsu.edu/reu/nano.html

Main keyboard shortcuts for nano:

Ctrl + O = Save (Write Out)
Ctrl + X = Exit
Ctrl + W = Search
Alt + 6 = Copy
Ctrl + U = Paste
Ctrl + G = Help

I strongly recommend that you have access to another computer so that you can refer to the instructions when installing Arch on your own machine.

As Head-on-a-Stick advises, avoid using yaourt. Use the recommended Arch package-build way.

Arch is nowhere near as intimidating as some would have you believe. I had been put off it for years because of its rumoured reputation. I need not have worried.

Just follow the installation instructions.

Good luck.

PS I used 3 partitions including sda3 for /home, as per Tutorial 2.

Last edited by beachboy2; 05-05-2015 at 06:25 AM. Reason: addition
 
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Old 05-05-2015, 05:58 AM   #6
Dman58
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I recommend Debian 8 Jessie, I've been using it for over a year now and have had no major issues. It just works and if something were to go wrong all errors are well documented and logged. Initially it was installed as Debian 7 but with all the updates it is now Debian 8 and I like it a lot.

I used to have Slackware but sometimes it gets over my head even though it is rock stable. Linux mint is fun as well but why not just go with Debian instead of the 100 derivatives out there.
 
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Old 05-05-2015, 07:04 AM   #7
beachboy2
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a2326,

I still recommend that you install pure Arch from scratch, but if you prefer not to do the initial spadework, then you could consider Manjaro:

http://www.zdnet.com/article/hand-on...-linux-0-8-11/

There is a large choice of Desktop Environments, including my personal preference MATE (bottom of page) and several Windows Managers:

https://wiki.manjaro.org/index.php?t...p_Environments
 
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Old 05-05-2015, 10:16 AM   #8
a2326
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Thanks for all your answers.

@Dman58: But Debian isn't a rolling release, isn't it? Is it possible to smoothly switch from one version to the next without reinstalling the whole OS?

@beachboy2: As far as I know Arch demands much Shell Script knowledge und many functions are only accessible via terminal, so it seems to be targeted at very advanced users with fast fingers and not a slow 2-finger typer like my humble self :-(
Would you still recommend it?
 
Old 05-05-2015, 10:20 AM   #9
Germany_chris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by a2326 View Post
Thanks for all your answers.

@Dman58: But Debian isn't a rolling release, isn't it? Is it possible to smoothly switch from one version to the next without reinstalling the whole OS?

@beachboy2: As far as I know Arch demands much Shell Script knowledge und many functions are only accessible via terminal, so it seems to be targeted at very advanced users with fast fingers and not a slow 2-finger typer like my humble self :-(
Would you still recommend it?
Arch requires you to read and think a bit. If you're going to go rolling go Arch but if I were you I'd ponder the reasons for the choice.
 
Old 05-05-2015, 10:32 AM   #10
BeaStiE35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by a2326 View Post
I tried Linux Mint Debian Edition, but it was not very stable
Are you spreading FUD...???

 
Old 05-05-2015, 11:00 AM   #11
ozar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by a2326 View Post
Are there any stable rolling releases that can be recommended? Thanks.
Count me in as another recommendation for Arch Linux. I've been running Linux for 15 years now, and the last 12 years have been with Arch Linux under the hood. So far, I've not even come close to thinking about switching to anything else. That said, I do still experiment with other distros now and then, just to see what's happening with them.

Good luck with your new distro choice!
 
Old 05-05-2015, 11:25 AM   #12
beachboy2
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a2326,

Once you get over the initial installation of Arch, the updating bit and adding new software is very straightforward.

First have a close look at the two tutorials I recommended for the Arch installation.

Tutorial 1 is designed to be taken one page at a time, in easy bite-size chunks.

If you think that the Arch installation is too demanding for you, then you may need to consider an Arch derivative such as Manjaro.


Good luck with whichever route you decide to take.
 
Old 05-05-2015, 11:29 AM   #13
DavidMcCann
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You need to distinguish two types of rolling-release distros: those which adopt that format to avoid having to install new editions, and those which intend to be bleeding-edge.

Early in the year, Distrowatch did a test of several rolling-release distros over several weeks, to see how reliable they were. Arch and PCLinuxOS fared best. Arch is bleeding-edge, but intended for everyday use, unlike OpenSUSE Tumbleweed or even Debian Unstable. PCLinuxOS is not intended to be bleeding-edge and is specifically aimed at family use.

PS. If you want Arch without spending a day on installation, you don't have to use a derivative (not that Manjaro isn't very good): Bridge is a simple installation disk for Arch.

Last edited by DavidMcCann; 05-05-2015 at 11:31 AM.
 
Old 05-05-2015, 04:46 PM   #14
Head_on_a_Stick
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachboy2 View Post
I strongly recommend that you have access to another computer so that you can refer to the instructions when installing Arch on your own machine.
Actually, elinks is on the Arch live ISO so you can have that displaying the Beginner's Guide in TTY2 whilst you install the system in TTY1 and switch between the two as you go
 
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Old 05-06-2015, 08:38 AM   #15
maples
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Head_on_a_Stick View Post
Actually, elinks is on the Arch live ISO so you can have that displaying the Beginner's Guide in TTY2 whilst you install the system in TTY1 and switch between the two as you go
Yes, but getting a network connection in the first place can be tricky, especially if you are forced to use Wi-Fi. Better safe than sorry.
 
  


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