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Old 01-06-2007, 07:49 PM   #1
mozilla_man
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Which one is the better of the two


ok then, i have been looking around and comparing many distros to one another. while i know for a fact all of them can more or less do the same thing. i am looking for the best that i can get for my needs. I have a HIGH END PC.

(ABOUT MY COMPUTER AND WHAT I USE IT FOR, SKIP THIS IF YOU FEEL NO NEED TO READ IT)

i have a high end PC that can chew through numbers no problem, i would like to have an OS that will not screw up my hardware... Windows made a mess out of my hard drive and slowed my beast down... that and its needlessly resource intensive. like when i first got my comp a few months ago, it ran games like a charm on the highest quality, (Doom 3, Half Life 2, Fear, Call of Duty 3) and so on. i am a bit of an ardent downloader and use many applications to do my bidding. i also abuse my internet and download mostly music files from my Itunes and Creative Commons music i find on the net. i write many many many important text files and presentations for my work and school projects.

i know i only had the thing for a few months (about 2 i think) and i think i went from having about 250 GB worth of free space to about a good 150 GB left. I ported a lot of my old work from my old PC to the new one. I have a lot of RAM 2 gigs and my processor is one of the newer Intel models. my computer shouldn't be this sluggish and i know its because of the way windows stores things on my hard drive, also the OS in general is a resource hog. also being that i am a heavy downloader i get viruses a lot. (AVAST! misses a few here and there...) and it can get chock full of adware and spyware (though spybot helps a lot with that) well thats it about my comp and me.

(STOP YOUR SKIPPING HEAR!)

Now on the to the main topic. I narrowed down my selection to just 3 linux distros. Open Suse, Ubuntu, and KUbuntu. what are the pro's and con's of each system? which would you choose? what makes its stand out of the rest? thanks again for your help!!!!
 
Old 01-06-2007, 08:26 PM   #2
MensaWater
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This is mainly a religious argument. There are Distro Reviews (see the right). I believe one of the FAQs here is about selecting the correct distro.

I'd recommend against Suse mainly because of its recent linkage with Microsoft. They should be punished for it by voting with our feet.

Ubuntu and Kubuntu are Debian derivatives.
 
Old 01-06-2007, 09:02 PM   #3
mozilla_man
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i never even noticed that (to the right of the screen there are distro reviews...) i feel a bit dumb at the moment. but thank you none the less for pointing that out. i never knew it was that debatible about which distro is the best. i honestly thought it was more, this distro can do this but not this and less of (as you said) a religious debate. well none the less i guess i will give debian a look than. thanks again for the info.
 
Old 01-06-2007, 09:17 PM   #4
San Chonino
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Ubuntu and Kubuntu are blessedly similar in terms of the way they work (and why not? They're made by the same people). I chose Ubuntu simply because I like the looks of the GNOME desktop better than the KDE. It's mostly a preference thing.
 
Old 01-06-2007, 09:46 PM   #5
JimBass
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The whole idea of there being "better" and "worse" disros is pretty much a windows idea. There is very little difference inbetween any distros. All use the same core kernel, and then just change the external things. The only thing that is important with the selection of a distro is to make sure it is new enough to detect your hardware. Often we'll see newbies install Red Hat 9 (6 years old?) or Debian stable (intended for servers), and then wonder why it doesn't detect their sata drives and fails to find their wireless card. Either ubuntu or kubuntu has a recent kernel on the install disks, so either of those should be fine. If you go with Debian, make sure you use Etch (testing) instead of Sarge (stable). Slackware is great, but tryng to do an install on super current hardware would be tough with the default 2.4.27 kernel that comes with it.

In any case, the only difference between ubuntu and kubuntu is the graphics. KDE for kubuntu, gnome for ubuntu. If you don't know the difference, then look at their live CDs and see which looks and feels better.

Peace,
JimBass
 
Old 01-07-2007, 02:39 AM   #6
Nylex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimBass
Slackware is great, but tryng to do an install on super current hardware would be tough with the default 2.4.27 kernel that comes with it.
The default is 2.4.33.3, but there are 2.6 kernels available as well.
 
Old 01-07-2007, 09:35 AM   #7
JimBass
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My bad. I just did Slackware 11.0 on a machine, and I typed without thinking. 2.4.27 is the default kernel for debian stable, but like Slackware, you cen tell it to install 2.6.8 without a problem from the same install disks.

The main point I was going for was that the "default" kernel for distros like Slack and Debian stable will probably be the toughest with brand new hardware.

Thanks for the clarification in any case Nylex.

Peace,
JimBass
 
  


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