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Old 04-12-2011, 02:50 PM   #16
johnsfine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rich_c View Post
There isn't a best one. There will be one that's best for you and your needs, however. You'll know it when you see it.
I don't agree. Too many choices is a key factor leading many Linux Newbies back to Windows. I also think a newbie has no way to recognize the best for him/her even after trying it.

There isn't a best Linux distribution for everyone. But there is a best Linux distribution for everyone who feels the need to ask the question.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Walter.Stroebel View Post
If you are asking this question then (IMHO) Ubuntu is problably the best.
It really is that simple.

I hope it doesn't stay that way. I think Mepis was more beginner friendly than Ubuntu both for reasons specific to Mepis and because KDE 3.5 was more beginner friendly than Gnome. But last I checked, KDE 4 was too beginner vicious to advise for any newbie. That leaves Ubuntu/Gnome. I expect someday KDE 4 will get better or the attempt to revive KDE 3.5 will go somewhere significant and there will once again be a more beginner friendly choice than Ubuntu/Gnome.

Last edited by johnsfine; 04-12-2011 at 02:56 PM.
 
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Old 04-12-2011, 02:59 PM   #17
explorer
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You can't call any one the best, or another the worst. It all depends on what you want to do and how much you want to have to learn. Ubuntu and Mandriva make user-driendly desktops. Slackware and the BSD's require quite a bit more effort to learn but also make good Desktops AND Servers and require you to know more about your system. Then there is everything in between like live-CD's, minimal Distributions, server only, firewalls, distro's just for disk and partition utilities.... It all depends on which is the best to you.
 
Old 04-12-2011, 06:06 PM   #18
theKbStockpiler
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Mandriva

Its hard to go wrong with Mandriva for a first distro. Best looking desktop and Menu management , DrakeTools and Mandriva Control Center. Mandriva has a lot of installation options that make it easy for a new user plus it still has the linux feel.Mandriva is always in the top five.

http://www.go2linux.org/top-5-linux-distribution

http://www.go2linux.org/top-5-linux-distribution

In my opinion Mandriva

Is Not Bloated

Is Not Better suited for an intermediate user

Does not create dependency on specific methods to accomplish tasks.

Is not perfect either. I like Fedora for an intermediate distro. If the distro you choose comes with "training wheels" you don't have to use them but if it does not come with them you won't be able to get much done as a beginner. Install more than one desktop of at least Kde Gnome and Xfce.

Last edited by theKbStockpiler; 04-12-2011 at 06:09 PM.
 
Old 04-12-2011, 06:41 PM   #19
explorer
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I have to agree with thekbstockpiler. I used Mandrake, then Mandriva for years and it was always user-friendly as well as robust.
 
Old 04-12-2011, 07:00 PM   #20
sycamorex
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LOL, it all comes down to individual preferences - I have never had Mandriva (or Suse) installed on my computer for more than 3 hours
 
Old 04-13-2011, 08:48 AM   #21
knightfree
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by arizonagroovejet View Post
Yet you registered your account here two years ago, almost to the day.
Interesting.
yeah,that is true.but at that time i only wanted to know what is linux,i didn't try it. now i want to have a try. because my english is very poor ,so i don't know if you can understand me.
 
Old 04-13-2011, 08:53 AM   #22
stress_junkie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knightfree View Post
yeah,that is true.but at that time i only wanted to know what is linux,i didn't try it. now i want to have a try. because my english is very poor ,so i don't know if you can understand me.
Your English is fine. You write English better than many Americans.

Hopefully you understand why nobody can answer your question. You should try few distributions and see what you like. Use a few different desktop managers as well since each one gives a different experience.

Last edited by stress_junkie; 04-13-2011 at 08:55 AM.
 
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Old 04-13-2011, 08:58 AM   #23
fbt
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go to distrowatch.com and go down (or start from the bottom and work your way up) the list until you find the one you like.
 
Old 04-13-2011, 10:26 AM   #24
AwesomeMachine
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Real Linux distros observe certain standards, such as FSH: file system hierarchy. RPM packaging is also a pseudo standard. Most distros offer some way to install RPM packages. Slackware is pure, raw, unadulterated Linux. Backtrack is a live slackware CD. Debian is the reference standard computer operating system. It will run on architectures spanning from embedded systems with 2 MB of ram, all the way up to IBM Z series mainframes and Cray supercomputers.

Ubuntu is the most broken distro, because it's actually the Debian unstable branch covered with gobs of whipped cream and frosting. Most operating systems have a GUI, but Ubuntu has a GOOEY! OpenSuse is fantastic, but it isn't anything like standard Linux. I learned on SuSE, versions 7.x and 9.x. OpenSuse will install on any PC hardware.

Sabayan is a mysterious and cryptic distro that has a different way of doing everything. It's actually Gentoo wearing cosmetics. That's one I never really learned. Fedora and Centos are Redhat based and very well heeled. If I want a distro that's trouble free and secure out-of-the-box, I use Fedora. I wish there was a Fedora live CD that doesn't suck.

Knoppix is a Debian live CD with KDE and plasma. It's quite a trip. But it's really fun. Knoppix works, but most of the programs aren't listed on the GUI menus. The best distro to learn Linux is probably SuSE. You don't have to read anything. You just kinda click around with the mouse. Everything is self explanatory. You don't need to spend time building the system the way you want it, because it installs what you want.

I use Debian on my laptop, and Fedora, Debian, SuSE, Ubuntu, Centos, and Arch on various other PCs.
 
Old 04-13-2011, 10:44 AM   #25
PrinceCruise
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Knight, my suggestion for a newbie is always Linux Mint.
You might want to check Linux Mint 10 from distrowatch.com, burn the live dvd and check by yourself.

Regards
Prince
 
Old 04-13-2011, 10:47 AM   #26
TobiSGD
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Two things:
Quote:
Originally Posted by AwesomeMachine View Post
Knoppix is a Debian live CD with KDE and plasma.
Since version 6 Knoppix uses LXDE as desktop.
Quote:
The best distro to learn Linux is probably SuSE. You don't have to read anything. You just kinda click around with the mouse.
I don't think that anyone can learn Linux without reading and with just clicking around. You will learn your GUI, and how you configure Suse with their GUI-tools, but you will definitely not learn Linux this way.
 
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Old 04-14-2011, 09:47 AM   #27
knightfree
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Thanks so far everybody.I'm very glade there are so many people help me.
 
Old 04-14-2011, 10:08 AM   #28
Mr. Alex
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My vote goes to Mint.
 
Old 04-15-2011, 01:16 PM   #29
Bodi
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In my opinion Debian.
 
Old 04-15-2011, 01:28 PM   #30
Mr. Alex
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I don't think so. It's so much easier to install nVidia drivers in Mint/Ubuntu than Debian. It's just one example...
 
  


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