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linuxceon 12-16-2011 03:43 PM

Which is the best for text editor on GUI?
 
Hello,
i am looking for text editor on GUI (not terminal command line, please)
So, which is the best text editor beside gedit?

Thank you.

linuxceon 12-16-2011 03:48 PM

Woops, it looks like i made mistake that i should not post thread in Linux - Newbie but post thread to Linux - Software

Sorry :(

Doc CPU 12-16-2011 03:49 PM

Hi there,

Quote:

Originally Posted by linuxceon (Post 4551922)
i am looking for text editor on GUI (not terminal command line, please)
So, which is the best text editor beside gedit?

I guess you'll get many different answers because everyone has their own favorite editor.
Mine is Bluefish on Linux, and Programmer's Notepad (PNP) on Windows.

[X] Doc CPU

Telengard 12-16-2011 04:11 PM

I like Emacs in GUI mode.

http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/tour/

linuxceon 12-16-2011 04:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Doc CPU (Post 4551926)
Hi there,



I guess you'll get many different answers because everyone has their own favorite editor.
Mine is Bluefish on Linux, and Programmer's Notepad (PNP) on Windows.

[X] Doc CPU

@Doc CPU thanks for reply
Bluefish, huh? I thought that it almost like Adobe Dreamweaver but it's not only use as web programmer when i read carefully. But also, can be use any purpose.

linuxceon 12-16-2011 04:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Telengard (Post 4551938)
I like Emacs in GUI mode.

http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/tour/

I think i know this, it looks great. Worth to try.

Thanks.

Doc CPU 12-16-2011 04:43 PM

Hi there,

Quote:

Originally Posted by linuxceon (Post 4551940)
Bluefish, huh? I thought that it almost like Adobe Dreamweaver but it's not only use as web programmer when i read carefully. But also, can be use any purpose.

I'm sorry I don't fully understand what you mean.
It hurts me a little that you compare Bluefish to Dreamweaver. As I see it, Bluefish is a simple, plain text editor, though it has some comfort like file-type-dependent syntax highlighting. But still, it's a pure text editor. And as such, it can be used to edit configuration files, HTML source files, C code, assembler source or just simple text.

[X] Doc CPU

linuxceon 12-16-2011 04:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Doc CPU (Post 4551960)
Hi there,



I'm sorry I don't fully understand what you mean.
It hurts me a little that you compare Bluefish to Dreamweaver. As I see it, Bluefish is a simple, plain text editor, though it has some comfort like file-type-dependent syntax highlighting. But still, it's a pure text editor. And as such, it can be used to edit configuration files, HTML source files, C code, assembler source or just simple text.

[X] Doc CPU

Sorry about that, sometimes my English is messed up.
I am just mean that o thought Bluefish is for web programming only, not like making software such as C++, C. But when i visit Bluefish official website and i read an info carefully, it's not just only for web programming but also for any purpose such as C++, C, MySQL and so on.
That's all what i mean.

Thanks

FredGSanford 12-16-2011 04:55 PM

To name a few...besides those already mention!

kwrite
mousepad
leafpad
kate

flamelord 12-16-2011 05:02 PM

personally, I like GVim, but it has a rather steep learning curve. Everyone has different preferences though, and my recommendation is that you try out several and see which one you like best.
a (short) list of some editors you might want to look at are:

gvim
emacs
gedit
kate/kwrite
geany
scribes
scite
and the others that have been listed.

linuxceon 12-16-2011 05:31 PM

I think that's enough for collecting information about text editor.

Thanks, everybody

theKbStockpiler 12-16-2011 05:42 PM

My Personal Favs.
 
Administrator level Editors or Programmer Level Editors?


Programmer Level:

Emacs is a multi-purpose throwback; in my opinion, which is a bit hard to understand at first. It takes a lot of mental Infrastructure to appreciate it for simple tasks. If you want Mad Programmer Skills , Emacs will put you next to R Stallman eventually if your head does not explode first.

VIM is more practical and is usually installed native along with Nano. Both Emacs and VIM have a crazy amount of configurations that I don't think can justify NOT altering your own behaviour a twinge. A Short Cut to correct accidentally reversed letters in a word??? This would be too much configuration.

Administrator Level:

Kate
Krite
Nano
I don't think Nano gets the exposure that it deserves. :twocents:

fingers99 12-16-2011 06:39 PM

Gvim gets my vote. It helps to know the Vim shortcuts, but it's absolutely not necessary.

Doc CPU 12-17-2011 04:00 AM

Hi there,

Quote:

Originally Posted by theKbStockpiler (Post 4551989)
I don't think Nano gets the exposure that it deserves. :twocents:

you may be right, but then nano is a pure console application, while the thread starter explicitly asked for a "text editor on GUI (not terminal command line, please)". Except there is another editor called nano that I don't know.

That said, nano is my standard editor on systems that have no GUI, like a GNU system with no X installed, or over a remote console. I don't see, however, why you would rate it that good. It's a text editor, alright. It works and it's fairly comfortable to use, but there is nothing really worth mentioning about it. - My two cents in turn.

[X] Doc CPU

H_TeXMeX_H 12-19-2011 11:21 AM

I use geany for both text editor and IDE, it is light enough that it can be used this way.


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