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Old 11-24-2007, 02:08 AM   #1
nwarp
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which is best for newcomer


I'm waiting on a couple of cd's one ubuntu the other kbuntu I've never used linux and trying it for first time. I'll be using a second hand computer just to see what these OS are like I'm using XP pro and vista home premium on new dual core cpu systems at moment at moment. XP pro I have bedded down after using for a few years Vista has been an education. I had both OS networked for printer sharing. After having many problems with a vista update which was corrupt( you won't find much of a mention about this fiasco anywhere Microsoft ignored it) I overcame the problem with a lot of grey matter scratching and forum searching .

To shorten a long query any one with advice which distro is suitable for a newcomer to the linux scene.

Regards from Down Under
 
Old 11-24-2007, 02:44 AM   #2
ciden
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The only difference between Kubuntu and Ubuntu is the Desktop Environment. The most populsr Desktop environments are KDE(kubuntu) and GNOME(ubuntu).
A desktop environment is a collection of coordinated apps.

Personally i feel KDE is more eyecandy and easier to switch to from windows since the look and feel is similar (if not better).
Try both but try Kubuntu first and most probably thats all it will take 2 switch you over.
 
Old 11-24-2007, 03:45 AM   #3
LinuxManMikeC
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Not trying to start a Gnome vs KDE war here, but I've used both and prefer Gnome. Yes, KDE is nice. It also has a lot of options, but for your average user there may be too many options. Too much power, flexibility and options defeat the visual simplicity that a GUI is supposed to provide. Not to say that Gnome isn't powerful, but I find the initial experience to be simpler and more friendly to your average user. When I really want power I usually just fire up a bash terminal. As far as what looks most similar to Windows, it doesn't really matter. You can customize either desktop to look and feel however you wish. I've had both KDE and Gnome looking like MacOS X! I've also seen other people get either desktop looking like Windows 9x, XP, and even Vista. Anyway, it doesn't really matter what I think. Like ciden said, "try both." You will like what you like, so go with it. In fact, you don't really have to choose between Ubuntu and Kubuntu, they are basically the same except for their default desktop environment. You can have both Gnome and KDE installed at the same time and switch between them at will. I'm sure you will probably even find some handy little program that was designed specifically for the other desktop environment and you will end up with at least the support libraries (if not the full desktop environment) installed anyway.

Last edited by LinuxManMikeC; 11-24-2007 at 03:48 AM.
 
Old 11-24-2007, 05:35 AM   #4
ollyc98
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I have just come from windows and started using gnome, It's very windowsish and easy to use. I haven't tried KDE but I'd like to, unfortunately I have no idea how to install it lol.
 
Old 11-24-2007, 08:11 AM   #5
brianL
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Do this in the terminal:
Code:
sudo aptitude install kde
Think that gets everything. Then, to change from Gnome to KDE (or vice versa), go to the System menu --> Quit --> Logout, and at the bottom of the Login screen click on Options.
 
Old 11-24-2007, 10:32 AM   #6
dasy2k1
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or even easier,
open synaptic,
and install kubuntu-desktop
 
Old 11-24-2007, 02:00 PM   #7
brianL
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Yeah, I was in a CLI mood.
 
Old 11-24-2007, 05:41 PM   #8
AceofSpades19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brianL View Post
Do this in the terminal:
Code:
sudo aptitude install kde
Think that gets everything. Then, to change from Gnome to KDE (or vice versa), go to the System menu --> Quit --> Logout, and at the bottom of the Login screen click on Options.
its actually
sudo apt-get install kubuntu-desktop
or
sudo aptitude install kubuntu-desktop
 
Old 11-24-2007, 06:45 PM   #9
mikieboy
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IMO, one of the plus points of Debian is that a standard desktop install gives you both KDE and Gnome so you can use either straight out of the box. It makes no sense to me to install two separate distros just to try out the different DEs. Install one and download the other DE.

I prefer to log into a Gnome session for most things as I don't like KDE's tendency to open its own choice of program for any given task, but I agree that KDE is more intuitive for Windows users and it seems to have a better selection of configuration tools.
 
Old 11-24-2007, 06:45 PM   #10
brianL
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My mistake. I thought "kde" was the full installation, and "kubuntu-desktop" was a partial one.
 
Old 11-25-2007, 08:00 PM   #11
AceofSpades19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikieboy View Post
IMO, one of the plus points of Debian is that a standard desktop install gives you both KDE and Gnome so you can use either straight out of the box. It makes no sense to me to install two separate distros just to try out the different DEs. Install one and download the other DE.

I prefer to log into a Gnome session for most things as I don't like KDE's tendency to open its own choice of program for any given task, but I agree that KDE is more intuitive for Windows users and it seems to have a better selection of configuration tools.
They make two different distros so that you can have a kde live-cd and a gnome live-cd, it would make no sense to install kde on a livecd
 
Old 11-26-2007, 10:34 AM   #12
ciden
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All things said, I find clicking on the desktop and list->sublist->subsublist->program very boring and stupid. I personally prefer fluxbox to any desktop environment because it stays out of your face. KDE and GNOME are both in your face kind of things.
Fluxbox -- no, no for newbies.
 
Old 11-27-2007, 05:13 AM   #13
nwarp
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Thank you all

Thankyou to all those who replied to my request. I have just installed ubuntu with only a few problems. I'm finding my way around the OS ok so far. I'll investigate in depth tomorrow.

Thank you again from downunder
 
  


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