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Old 12-03-2008, 04:26 PM   #1
unleash
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Thumbs up which distro to use??(i am switching to linux)


ibm r50e(1.3 ghz, ram-512mb).. which all linux versions can i install and boot and run on this machine?
PS: its my first time
 
Old 12-03-2008, 04:35 PM   #2
Lordandmaker
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Pretty much anything x86-based will work.

Ubuntu and Fedora are good places to start, but it's rare that you find two people with the same idea of an ideal distro for anything.
Pick one and try it, if you don't get along with it, try another.
 
Old 12-03-2008, 04:36 PM   #3
jailbait
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Most Linux distributions will work on your machine. Here are some recommendations:

http://www.linuxcompatible.org/IBM_T...0e_c12902.html

------------------
Steve Stites
 
Old 12-03-2008, 06:06 PM   #4
lakedude
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unleash View Post
ibm r50e(1.3 ghz, ram-512mb).. which all linux versions can i install and boot and run on this machine?
PS: its my first time
That is a pretty weak machine by today's standards. As such I recommend a smaller, lighter, faster distro like Puppy or perhaps DSL. Puppy is a very small download at ~96MB. You could try it from live CD and see what you think with very little effort and zero commitment.

http://www.puppylinux.org/
 
Old 12-03-2008, 06:19 PM   #5
baig
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I am running Fedora 8 on my old pc 755~ Processor and about 370RAM... It's a little bit slow at start but its fine.. Am thinking about upgrading it form 8 to 9:-)


Fedora or Ubuntu is the rite spot .. Good Luck!!


Cheers!!
 
Old 12-03-2008, 06:48 PM   #6
thorkelljarl
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The face of a distribution is the desktop. Try a live-cd. Try one with Gnome, try one with KDE, try one with a lightweight desktop. Try Ubuntu for its many users. Try puppy for its enthusiasm. Try openSUSE 11.0 because it's my favorite. Welcome
 
Old 12-03-2008, 07:42 PM   #7
linuxcanuck
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Your hardware will support just about any distribution. Selecting a distro that is right for you is about personal preference and your level of experience.

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compari..._distributions

Distributions can be divided into groups by several criteria. You can divide them by package management, mainly by RPM (Red Hat/ Fedora/ Mandriva/ OpenSUSE) and DEB (Debian/ Ubuntu/ MEPIS). There are other options. RPM is more common by the number of distributions that use it, but DEB is widely considered to be the more durable and easier to use. Also there are more packages in the DEB format, by far.

Another thing to consider is what you want to use it for. SUSE and CENTOS (Red Hat derivative) are widely used for enterprise. Ubuntu is the most common desktop distribution.

Support is also important. Ubuntu has the largest community and the most forums. It is regarded as the best support option. It also has the easiest and most flexible installer. You can even install it from Windows using WUBI, without the need to partition.

Something to consider is your willingness to deal with proprietary hardware and codecs. Some distros steer clear of and even make it difficult to use proprietary solutions. Debian and Fedora make it particularly hard to configure proprietary drivers, multimedia codecs and install things that Windows users take for granted. Ubuntu tries to walk the fence on the issue. They are not installed by default but can be enabled simply. Other distros are much easier with regard to this. Linux Mint (Ubuntu derivative), SimplyMEPIS (Debian derivative), Mandriva, and PCLinuxOS are the easiest.

Debian does not even allow you to install Firefox, Thunderbird, Seamonkey or Sunbird. They have problems with Mozilla's licensing. You can get older clones released under different names, but if you want to run the latest versions you should steer clear of Debian, Sidux and a few others.

However, in balance all distros deliver to one degree or another, each having its specialty. There are advantages and disadvantages to each.

Many people choose Ubuntu because its stated goal is to be for humans. It tries to be everything to everyone and succeeds or fails depending on who you talk to. Its advantages are the most users, the most packages, the most forums, free disks including shipping and the best and most flexible installer. Its disadvantage is that it tries to do too much and this often leaves some users with the feeling that it falls short of expectations. A compromise would be to try Linux Mint which is Ubuntu, but it is based on an older version and it is more newbie friendly.

Many others choose Fedora because they like the fact that it is supported by Red Hat. It has a reputation for being bleeding edge and this leads to problems for newbies. It can be tricky to configure and is considered to be for intermediate users. It has many devotees, but expect them to talk over your head, at least at first.

OpenSUSE is from another big company Novell. It is well supported and has the backing of Microsoft, which is either good or bad depending on how you view such things.

Mandriva is an independent company that has been around for a long time. They have a long history and have spawned many distros based on it, such as PCLOS. It is easy to use and has lots of tools.

There are other choices and most of them are ones that you might want to look after once you get your feet wet.

Easiest to try are Mint, MEPIS, and PCLOS. MEPIS and PCLOS have the advantage of being KDE 3 based which is more like Windows. Gnome based distros are less configurable, but give you less to think about right off.

You can't go wrong. Linux is a feast. It is a free, all you can eat smörgåsbord.

Last edited by linuxcanuck; 12-03-2008 at 08:08 PM.
 
Old 12-03-2008, 08:07 PM   #8
phantom_cyph
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linuxcanuck View Post
Distributions can be divided into groups by several criteria. You can divide them by package management, mainly by RPM (Red Hat/ Fedora/ Mandriva/ OpenSUSE) and DEB (Debian/ Ubuntu/ MEPIS). There are other options. RPM is more common by the number of distributions that use it, but DEB is widely considered to be the more durable and easier to use. Also there are more packages in the DEB format, by far.
Forgetting tgz, pup, and installation by source? If you want to get to know Linux, you may want to install some programs from source every once in a while so you know how to.


Quote:
Support is also important. Ubuntu has the largest community and the most forums. It is regarded as the best support option. It also has the easiest and most flexible installer. You can even install it from Windows using WUBI, without the need to partition.
You're in a forum with over 300,000 members. The chances of picking an up-to-date distro that no one in this forum can help you out with are slim, so feel free to explore.

Quote:
Debian does not even allow you to install Firefox, Thunderbird, Seamonkey or Sunbird. They have problems with Mozilla's licensing. You can get older clones released under different names, but if you want to run the latest versions you should steer clear of Debian, Sidux and a few others.
Not allow?? You make Debian sound like Windows Vista. They don't have Firefox, Thunderbird, Seamonkey, or Sunbird on install, that does not mean you can't install them.
 
Old 12-04-2008, 03:01 AM   #9
H_TeXMeX_H
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I've heard SimplyMEPIS is really good, better than Ubuntu. I haven't tried it tho.
 
Old 12-04-2008, 05:06 AM   #10
tommcd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unleash View Post
ibm r50e(1.3 ghz, ram-512mb).. which all linux versions can i install and boot and run on this machine?
PS: its my first time
Try Ubuntu. For a beginner you can't go wrong with Ubuntu. See this site for gettinig started with Ubuntu (there are many others, but this one is very good, and is maintained by a staff member of the Ubuntu forums):
http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/
Join the Ubuntu forums also.
Ubuntu will run ok on your machine. It will likely be faster than Windows XP on your hardware. It would be good if you could increase the RAM to 1GB though. The performance would be better with 1GB RAM, but 512MB will run ok.
 
Old 12-04-2008, 05:07 AM   #11
brianL
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I would suggest trying as many distros as can for a few days each, then choosing the one that suits you best. I've run several distros on a machine with a 1.8 GHz processor and 512 MB RAM, so that should be OK.
 
Old 12-04-2008, 05:35 AM   #12
craigevil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linuxcanuck View Post

Debian does not even allow you to install Firefox, Thunderbird, Seamonkey or Sunbird. They have problems with Mozilla's licensing. You can get older clones released under different names, but if you want to run the latest versions you should steer clear of Debian, Sidux and a few others.
WTF?
Iceweasel=Firefox
Icedove=Thunderbird

Iceweasel is the same version as Mozilla's Firefox. Get your facts straight. As for multimedia add one repo and apt-get install, 2 minutes later you have any codec/apps you need.


As for the OP, go to distrowatch and try a few of the top 20 distros, most have livecds you can run without installing.





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Installed Plugins: (13)
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Old 12-04-2008, 06:16 AM   #13
lakedude
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Mint and Ubuntu are SLOW and therefore not a good choice for older hardware IMHO. Yeah Ubuntu is easy to install and has great support but it is a bit slow. Mint is even slower. These distros tested my patience on a 2.1GHz dual core system so I can only imagine how slow they are on a 1.3GHz single core.

As far as Package Managers go:

Puppy uses the PETget package manager (PupGet is the old way) which makes installing updates and downloading new programs super easy.

Sabayon uses Spritz/Entropy which works in a similar super easy way.

I totally agree that trying a few Live CDs is a good idea. Unleash go ahead and try Mint, Ubuntu, Sabayon and Puppy and then come back and tell us what you think. Perhaps things have changed since I last experimented or perhaps some disros had compatibility issues with my hardware and your results will be different.

Last edited by lakedude; 12-04-2008 at 07:32 AM.
 
Old 12-04-2008, 07:01 AM   #14
skob
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lakedude View Post
...Yeah Ubuntu is easy to install and has great support but it is a bit slow....
i run Xubuntu on aP3 at 800MHz with 256MB RAM and aside from startup its pretty fast. of course xface isn't like KDE or gnome, but it fits most needs
 
Old 12-04-2008, 07:29 AM   #15
lakedude
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skob View Post
i run Xubuntu on aP3 at 800MHz with 256MB RAM and aside from startup its pretty fast. of course xface isn't like KDE or gnome, but it fits most needs
Xubuntu sounds like a great idea if the OP was inclined to go for a Ubuntu variant. Normally I suggest Kubuntu over Ubuntu (because I prefer KDE) but in this case (slow single core CPU) Xubuntu sounds great.

Mephis Anti-X (not the larger regular version) would be another distro worth checking out.

Of course there is always Puppy......

Did I already mention Puppy?
 
  


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