LinuxQuestions.org
Register a domain and help support LQ
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 12-21-2007, 11:09 AM   #1
JawsThemeSwimming428
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: 0
Which distro to use?


I am having some difficulty in deciding which distro to commit to. I have been working with computers since I was 10 (I am now 23). I have a degree in Network Communications and work as a System/Network Admin for a medium sized company. I have used Ubuntu for about 2 years and I liked it very much. However, as of late it seems to be a little unstable and strange things happen more frequently. I would like to test out a few more distros to see if I would like any of them better. Other distros I have very minimal experience using are Fedora, Linux Mint, Sabayon, PCLinuxOS, Wolvix, Mandriva, and Sam Linux. I recently installed Mepis 6.5 on my HDD on a separate partition and I have been using it for about 2 weeks and so far love it (except I have yet to get my sound working). I was wondering, based on what I have told you above, what other distros I should test out. So far Mepis is amazing and I think it might be my choice! I have also been looking at Linux Mint, Sabayon, and Vector Linux. Can anyone else tell me some others that might be good to check out?

Requirements:

1. Fairly easy to use (Not a very technical distro)
2. Integrates with Windows (File sharing)
3. Good support community (forum) and documentation
4. Stability!!!!
5. I don't mind if it uses Gnome (I have used that for 2 years with Ubuntu) but since I installed Mepis I am loving the KDE desktop.


Thanks for any input!
 
Old 12-21-2007, 11:13 AM   #2
Nylex
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 7,464

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Slackware.
 
Old 12-21-2007, 01:34 PM   #3
JawsThemeSwimming428
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Posts: 2

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thanks! I think that might be a little too technical for my understanding of Linux at this point. Or am I wrong?
 
Old 12-21-2007, 01:57 PM   #4
mrrangerman
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2007
Location: MI
Distribution: Debian Slackware
Posts: 528

Rep: Reputation: 50
If you like using the Synaptic Package manager give Debian Etch a try. Slackware is good also but Debian has it together with their Package Manager system. I personally feel Ubuntu needs to slow up a little just for the reason you mentioned. Ubuntu has done a great job in drawing people to linux, but they are changing so fast they're becoming unstable. If you give Debian a try, do a netinstall and as it's booting to the install cd at the prompt hit F1 and take a look at the options, I think it's F3 will give you boot options pick the installgui option. That brings up a nice gui install menus to work with, a lot like the Ubuntu install.
 
Old 12-21-2007, 04:19 PM   #5
dasy2k1
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: 127.0.0.1
Distribution: Ubuntu 12.04 X86_64
Posts: 958

Rep: Reputation: 35
ubuntu and opensuse are 2 of the easiest that do what you want.
though they are by no means the only easy to use ones...

try a few out and stick with one you like...

(i use ubuntu for most every day stuff as its really easy to use)
 
Old 12-21-2007, 06:30 PM   #6
dasy2k1
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: 127.0.0.1
Distribution: Ubuntu 12.04 X86_64
Posts: 958

Rep: Reputation: 35
http://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major

gives all the major distros with their pros and cons
 
Old 12-21-2007, 06:53 PM   #7
masonm
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2003
Location: Following the white rabbit
Distribution: Solus
Posts: 2,254

Rep: Reputation: 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by JawsThemeSwimming428 View Post
Thanks! I think that might be a little too technical for my understanding of Linux at this point. Or am I wrong?
Depends upon whether you want to learn or remain ignorant. Seems like kind of an odd statement for someone who claims to be a "System/Network Admin".

Slack's reputation for being difficult is unearned and pretty much an urban myth.
 
Old 12-21-2007, 07:24 PM   #8
KnightHawk
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Posts: 128

Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by masonm View Post
Depends upon whether you want to learn or remain ignorant. Seems like kind of an odd statement for someone who claims to be a "System/Network Admin".

Slack's reputation for being difficult is unearned and pretty much an urban myth.

I have to agree. As far as techincal know how, as long as you are familiar with disk partitions, and linux swap partitions its really not any more difficult than any other distro. Disk setup is probably the #1 thing I think is hard about slackware install, and it something other installations have to go thru as well but I think they put in pretty good vanilla settings where slackware doesn't even bother.

But if your any sort of real sys/network admin disk partitioning should not scare you.

Depending on how much you want to learn Linux, you may very well welcome the minimlist approach slackware takes to linux distros. Coming from redhat I know I did.

That being said I thought Ubuntu was great. I'd gladly use it as a desktop only OS, but all too often I'm trying to run quasi desktop/server machines.

Try to turn an ubuntu desktop install into a server, its a complete PITA, then if you get the Ubuntu Server distro, its a PITA to make it a good desktop.

With slackware accomplishing either or both is not any more challenging.

Although given that I'm a hardcore Slackware user, I'm not sure I'm the best authority on Ubuntu, but I know I tried it, and went crying back to Slacky.
 
Old 12-21-2007, 07:34 PM   #9
jay73
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Location: Belgium
Distribution: Ubuntu 11.04, Debian testing
Posts: 5,019

Rep: Reputation: 130Reputation: 130
Well, if would also depend on what you would use it for. If you need it to learn for work, you should really use Fedora/CentOS/RedHat or Suse (although I have some serious doubts about openSuse because of stability issues). I am always enthusiastic about new Mandriva releases - until they start dissolving into a dependency hell only two months later... Slackware is nice but, well, I'm sorry to say so, it's not the best choice from a professional point of view. When employers expect Linux skills, you know that they are usually talking about RedHat or Suse.

Last edited by jay73; 12-21-2007 at 07:37 PM.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
math distro....? music distro...? small distro....? jasonparent Linux - Newbie 11 02-11-2008 10:57 AM
How to convert a rpm based distro into deb (apt-get) distro ? pleasehelpme Linux - Newbie 3 02-11-2008 01:20 AM
LXer: DistroWatch Weekly: Distro hopping, Linux Format's distro mega-test LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 06-11-2007 05:47 AM
Distro: Less scripting. Looking for mainly Elf binary based distro Z505 Linux - General 1 04-03-2005 12:33 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:50 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration