LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Linux Power User Bundle
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 03-16-2005, 08:11 PM   #1
Lyko
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Posts: 69

Rep: Reputation: 15
Which Distro for Me?


I am not sure which distro I should install on my new computer. About 3 days ago, I downloaded Ubuntu on an old family computer, but I cannot run .rpm files (LimeWire, BitTorrent, 3ddesktop) easily, which I really want. I am very, very new to Linux, and I don't really understand command lines. That being said, I also don't want a dumbed down version either. What do you recommend? It will be dual-boot (w/ Windows) on a 160 Gig AMD Athlon 64 system, if that matters.

Last edited by Lyko; 03-16-2005 at 08:18 PM.
 
Old 03-16-2005, 08:34 PM   #2
t3gah
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Distribution: SuSE, RedHat, ubuntu, Debian
Posts: 734

Rep: Reputation: 30
Fedora or Mandrake is what I'd go for.

Check out this thread for Fedora http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...hreadid=297834

There's a link to a complete walkthrough of a Fedora Core Linux installation. The latest stable version is Core 3.


Some people might suggest Slackware, but that I believe truly is for experienced Linux people only. But that's just my opinion.


As for ubuntu, did you have the recommended 128MB of RAM for X-Windows System when you tried to install ubuntu on the old box?
 
Old 03-16-2005, 08:38 PM   #3
Mr. Hill
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2005
Location: Pepperland
Distribution: Arch Wombat, FreeBSD Current, OpenBSD 3.7
Posts: 238

Rep: Reputation: 30
Xandros is easier than hell. I really love Slack, the install is fool proof.

Mandrake and Red Hat are cool too. I really don't trust SuSE but meh - www.linuxiso.com that's a good site if you're new to Linux. I use distrowatch but that's not that great if you're just starting out. Best of luck to you.
 
Old 03-16-2005, 08:42 PM   #4
Lyko
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Posts: 69

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
So what would you pick between Mandrake, Fedora, and Red Hat?
 
Old 03-16-2005, 08:46 PM   #5
Mr. Hill
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2005
Location: Pepperland
Distribution: Arch Wombat, FreeBSD Current, OpenBSD 3.7
Posts: 238

Rep: Reputation: 30
RH is Fedora technically. Red Hat is really old but I like it a bit more than Fedora. That's just me though. Mandrake looks really cool but it's really limited, Fedora comes with a ton of cool programs while Mandrake is iffy on programs. Both are really easy installs, my personal opinion would be is to get Fedora. My first distro was Red Hat and I really enjoyed it I then moved on to Fedora and thought it was pretty good. The decision is really all up to you - I can only give you personal advice.
 
Old 03-16-2005, 11:45 PM   #6
Lyko
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Posts: 69

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Should I stick with Ubunto or Debian?
 
Old 03-16-2005, 11:55 PM   #7
mrchaos
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Distribution: Slackware current, Fedora Core 5, SuSE 10.1 OSS
Posts: 298

Rep: Reputation: 30
don't go for slack... it's harder to use than a fishing pole in a desert >. I'd go for fedora core 3... or wait for final release 4, which is apparently due in a month or so.

Last edited by mrchaos; 03-16-2005 at 11:56 PM.
 
Old 03-17-2005, 01:05 AM   #8
dx0r515t
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: USA
Distribution: Slackware 10.2 & 11.0
Posts: 155

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally posted by mrchaos
don't go for slack... it's harder to use than a fishing pole in a desert >. I'd go for fedora core 3... or wait for final release 4, which is apparently due in a month or so.
Slackware really isn't that hard..... you just can't be scared of the command line is all....
 
Old 03-17-2005, 04:11 AM   #9
titopoquito
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: Lower Rhine region, Germany
Distribution: Slackware 14.1 (32 and 64 bit)
Posts: 1,587

Rep: Reputation: 121Reputation: 121
You could create partitions for two linux installs. If it's possible, create a extended partition and a primary partition, too. Then you have the possibility to try out some distributions without the fear to screw something up - the primary partition allows to install FreeBSD, that is too hard for the beginning, but might be worth to try after your first steps on the commandline
My tip: Install Mandrake (found it a good beginner's distro) or Fedora in your first linux partition and try the others (like Slackware, Ubuntu, Debian ...) in the second one. And I have stand in line wsith dx0r515tdx0r515t: Slackware might be a little hard for you, if you are completely new to Linux and commandline, but you can manage it even without being any magician or voodoo priest. The proof for that statement: I'm managing it right now, step by step :P

titopoquito
 
Old 03-17-2005, 05:12 AM   #10
FredCDobbs
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Location: People's Republic of Massachusetts
Distribution: darwin 9.2
Posts: 5

Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally posted by titopoquito
You could create partitions for two linux installs. If it's possible, create a extended partition and a primary partition, too. Then you have the possibility to try out some distributions without the fear to screw something up - the primary partition allows to install FreeBSD, that is too hard for the beginning, but might be worth to try after your first steps on the commandline
Could I create two separate linux partitions during an install? I am probably going to install RH 5.2 because I A) have it in my hands B) it is easy to install. Slackware looks interesting, but I am concerned with ease of installation. I fear no command line.
 
Old 03-17-2005, 06:08 AM   #11
titopoquito
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: Lower Rhine region, Germany
Distribution: Slackware 14.1 (32 and 64 bit)
Posts: 1,587

Rep: Reputation: 121Reputation: 121
I don't know the red hat installation process. When you install Slackware, you get the chance to do some partitioning first. I guess there will be no difference when you install Red Hat. So you could create some more partitions, but use only the ones you need in each installation.
E. g. you could create one swap partition, two "/" root partitions, and two for each "/home" at least, maybe additional for "/var" and "/tmp", thats what I did. You can read often something like "Linux is about offering the freedom to chose". If you have found "your" distro you can easily free up the additional space and stick with only one distribution, whether it may be Red Hat, Unbuntu, Slackware, Debian, Mepis, Mandrake, Fedora or any of the thousand others available

The slackware installation process is not very graphical, but easy. You don't have to be a commandline wizard for that. Read the instructions on the monitor carefully and you will manage it with no problem. But you will have to configure your X-server from commandline after that. Just type xorgconfig to do this, you will be guided through this, but have your hardware specs near you (refresh rates of monitor, which graphic card do you have). After that you could type "startx" and look into KDE or another Desktop environment/window manager and explore the commandline in a terminal window. That's not too complicated.
Don't be afraid of Slackware. It's effecively not more difficult to manage than the other distros I tried, but it might look more difficult at the first glance. I can only encourage you to try it [no, I don't want to start a flame war; it was and is just a good learning platform for myself].
 
Old 03-17-2005, 06:11 AM   #12
titopoquito
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: Lower Rhine region, Germany
Distribution: Slackware 14.1 (32 and 64 bit)
Posts: 1,587

Rep: Reputation: 121Reputation: 121
I just couldn't find it, but here is it: A installation guide for Slackware. Even if it's older the installation will pretty quite be the same. The only "tricky" part I see for myself is the partitioning. Maybe this helps you in deciding if it might be the right thing for you now and if it's easy enough.

edit: providing the link would be a good idea


Slack installation guide on Bitbender forum

titopoquito

Last edited by titopoquito; 03-17-2005 at 06:13 AM.
 
Old 03-17-2005, 07:14 AM   #13
Stealth870
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Posts: 57

Rep: Reputation: 15
Just use "sudo apt-get install programname" or snyaptic (which comes in Ubuntu). Debian based distros are easiest thing to get packages from (because of the miracle that is apt-get)
 
Old 03-19-2005, 01:05 AM   #14
t3gah
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Distribution: SuSE, RedHat, ubuntu, Debian
Posts: 734

Rep: Reputation: 30
Arrow Installing Fedora Core 3 (complete with screenshots)

Check out this install howto from Que Publishing.

Installing Fedora Core 3 (complete with screenshots)
* By Billy Ball, Hoyt Duff.

http://www.quepublishing.com/article...55337&seqNum=1

or here : http://www.informit.com/articles/article.asp?p=355337
 
Old 03-19-2005, 01:12 AM   #15
JSpired
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Distribution: Slackware, Suse 9.2
Posts: 565

Rep: Reputation: 30
Honestly, I would take the time to learn Ubuntu, since you already have it installed. Updating via Ubuntu with the command line is quite easy! Search the Ubuntu forums for more info.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Upgrade Kernel, distro, or switch distro? badmofo666 Linux - Newbie 9 12-20-2005 01:02 AM
which distro is a Gnu/Linux distro masand Linux - General 24 09-14-2005 06:26 PM
New SUSE Distro. - Which distro., should I buy or download? vcroww SUSE / openSUSE 11 08-24-2005 04:29 AM
Distro: Less scripting. Looking for mainly Elf binary based distro Z505 Linux - General 1 04-03-2005 12:33 AM
Exchanging packages from Distro to Distro. Can this be done? Satriani Linux - General 4 05-31-2003 05:08 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:43 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration