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Old 02-28-2010, 08:28 PM   #1
overlook1977
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Which Distro comes with the most extras off the bat?


I have experimented with several different linux distros and I was impressed with the extra software the knoppix live cd had. I installed Fedora 12 (from the DVD torrent, not live CD) and was disappointed with the scant amount of extra software that came on the install. Which linux distro comes with the most extra software from intitial install? Specifically, games, scientific/astronomy, and educational applications?
 
Old 02-28-2010, 08:37 PM   #2
damgar
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I don't know for certain that Debian/Mint/Ubuntu will have the most off the disk, but the .deb repositories are probably the largest. So long as you have a decent internet connection any one of those (Ubuntu and Mint are probably more "newbie friendly") are probably the way to go.
 
Old 02-28-2010, 08:43 PM   #3
custangro
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Mint
 
Old 02-28-2010, 08:45 PM   #4
lupusarcanus
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Ubuntu Ultimate Gamers Edition. I think.

openSUSE 4.2 GB DVD comes pretty close.

BackTrack 4 has a whole bunch of specialized applications.

Slackware, the full 'recommended' install has quite a lot as well.
 
Old 03-01-2010, 12:33 PM   #5
dlundmark
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overlook1977 View Post
I have experimented with several different linux distros and I was impressed with the extra software the knoppix live cd had. I installed Fedora 12 (from the DVD torrent, not live CD) and was disappointed with the scant amount of extra software that came on the install. Which linux distro comes with the most extra software from intitial install? Specifically, games, scientific/astronomy, and educational applications?
Hi:
To answer your question directly: Probably Fedora 12 is one of the best at present. OpenSuse is also very good. Another great one great one is Ubuntu. They all have great software support (You will have to use the add software or upgrade, may not start automatically ) and can be set up with your choice of desktops.
There are many different distros, some are for games, video and sound file editing (Musix 2.0), science and so on. I recommend http://www.distrowatch.com for the latest. Other sites are good, including this one. You will have to read each one of the distros explanations as to what they are and how to use each.
Here is something I have found very helpful in experimenting with different distros. I have a number of hard drives I have bought on Ebay and other places. I install on that drive with no other in the system and set up that distribution the way I want. Then I can remove that drive and put in another one for another distro. This way there is no conflict with other OSes in the system. I use "hot swap hard drive case or slide". This makes it easy to remove the hard drive and put in another one for experimenting or setup. The nice thing about a removable hard drive is that the case can stay closed. These kinds of removable hard drive slides come for scsi and IDE. It is nice to have more than one for immediate swapping. They should never be pulled out as the system is running, that is only for special hardware and software combinations.
I have installed and experimented with more than 30 different distributions over the last few years. The whole Linux experience has really come to the adult stage so to speak in my estimation and can handle it's own in the world of operating systems. Some of the smaller distros are for special things such as Dban to zero all sectors on a hard drive. Others will format the hard drive while checking the sectors in all the various kinds of configurations such as the different Linux and the Microsoft types.

Last edited by dlundmark; 03-01-2010 at 12:44 PM.
 
Old 03-01-2010, 02:48 PM   #6
TheStarLion
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If you're not picky about what you get, I'd agree with leopard - Slackware's complete install from a DVD offers the most I've seen yet; however, if you're after a one-app-per-task distro, you'll be more inclined to look at X/K/Ubuntu, perhaps Crunchbang if you've a need to be light weight (Or the test of ArchBang found in the General forum on here), Debian or Mint.

Generally, if you're after more, and it's available, DVD released come with more on them. In some cases (Ubuntu, I believe) it's mostly just internationalization, however.
 
Old 03-01-2010, 03:05 PM   #7
snowpine
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Learn how to install software in Linux, is the easy answer. Any good distro has thousands of applications in its software "repository."

In Fedora for example you install applications with:

Code:
yum install packagename
To answer your actual question, Sabayon is a pretty feature-packed Live DVD. That's a silly reason to choose one distro over another, however, IMHO.
 
Old 03-01-2010, 09:16 PM   #8
dlundmark
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowpine View Post
Learn how to install software in Linux, is the easy answer. Any good distro has thousands of applications in its software "repository."

In Fedora for example you install applications with:

Code:
yum install packagename
To answer your actual question, Sabayon is a pretty feature-packed Live DVD. That's a silly reason to choose one distro over another, however, IMHO.
Hi:
Actually most any of the distros which have Debian as a base have a good amount of games and you can also use a program such as Wine to run MS Windows programs as well as games. To set up the sound and possibly other items in the games sometimes will be a challenge.
Many of these distros can make a great operating system for a games platform. Some experimenting would certainly be in order. The heavy-weight Dos or Windows games may not run very good, unless you have enough memory installed on your system.
And speaking of memory, I would suggest that with a 2Ghz processor, over 100GB hard drive, and 2 GB of ram would be good. How ever, I believe that would be minimum in many cases from my experimenting with these many systems over time.
 
Old 03-01-2010, 09:24 PM   #9
evo2
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If you really want "everything" a "complete" Debian installation comes on 5 DVDs. There should be more than enough there to keep you busy. However, as pointed out by others: why would you wan't everything at install time? Surely it is better just to install the packages that you actually want to use.

Evo2.
 
Old 03-01-2010, 09:24 PM   #10
jefro
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http://ultimateedition.info/ http://ultimate.linuxfreedom.com/

Don't know why you need it on a disk. You can use any of the major distros software management to add in almost an unlimited amount to apps.
 
Old 03-02-2010, 07:35 AM   #11
onebuck
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Hi,

I think that the user should learn to manage the system installed packages for a distribution therefore that same user would have pretty much any application that would be needed.

If the user understands the installation/management/compilation requirements then it's just: 'if said application is available as FOSS'. Most good authors provide instructions via README to allow adaption/installation of their software.

To the 'OP', you really need to rid yourself of the 'M$ Windows' mindset. The FOSS community is broad so you should be able to find a application to suit your requirements. If not then possible adaptation with 'WINE' to that other OS applications.
 
Old 03-02-2010, 09:03 AM   #12
lupusarcanus
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Personally, I end up removing half the stuff distributions come with. In your example, you were not pleased with Fedora 12 because it has too little. I hated Fedora for putting too much stuff. Same thing I do with Microsoft Windows, I remove all the stuff that comes with it as well. I'd rather have a fine-tuned system that meets my needs and wants than have a bloated system with a whole bunch of stuff I don't need. That's why I like Arch, and have an entire HDD dedicated to it. It starts out with a very simple system, and you, the user, build it up to what you want.
 
Old 03-03-2010, 09:55 PM   #13
dlundmark
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leopard View Post
Personally, I end up removing half the stuff distributions come with. In your example, you were not pleased with Fedora 12 because it has too little. I hated Fedora for putting too much stuff. Same thing I do with Microsoft Windows, I remove all the stuff that comes with it as well. I'd rather have a fine-tuned system that meets my needs and wants than have a bloated system with a whole bunch of stuff I don't need. That's why I like Arch, and have an entire HDD dedicated to it. It starts out with a very simple system, and you, the user, build it up to what you want.
Hi Leopard:
Sure, a person can use a lot of the stuff which comes with any installation. Just remember the programs do take up space on the HD, but do not take any of the memory, unless you install it as a "background" kind of program, that can take some memory usage.
When you go to the online libraries, you can search and read what each program can do using the windowed program. This is what I do, that way I can pick what I want, and install it. If it is not very good to my liking, or has problems, then I can uninstall the program or app and let the system delete it off the hd.

As said before by others, there are hundreds of great programs which can do as much or more than what the programs on MS systems can do, and are mostly for free use and copy. Even if someone installs all the programs which come with the initial install, there will surely be programs which we all want, thus it is necessary to do a search at the online database which is called and accessed in more than one way. Most of the distributions I have installed have more than one way to download and install programs. One way is with the terminal at a prompt. The other way uses a program which will search, update and even find new programs for the system in sometimes more than one depository or library (database). I usually like to use the program which is built into the system and will do all this automatically, simply because it is not necessary to put in a line of text to access and download your preferred programs or apps.
 
Old 03-03-2010, 11:32 PM   #14
Wifi-Fanatux
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On a single DVD

I would say Knoppix, mainly because the major distros (Suse, Mandriva, Fedora, etc.) include the three major desktop environments, and the DVD therefore has redundant applications based on each DE, as well as the libraries of each desktop. On the other hand if having KDE as well as Gnome and XFCE is considered an "extra" to you, then I guess the opposite would be true.
 
Old 03-04-2010, 12:31 AM   #15
fakie_flip
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Get the Knoppix Live DVD instead of the cd. It holds a lot more software that you can test and see which best suits your preferences.
 
  


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