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Old 12-13-2011, 06:47 PM   #1
stripe
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which distro??


Hi all

just a quickie on any good desktop distros that can be run as root? I am sick to death of having to enter passwords every time I want to make changes on MY MACHINE (its my hardware and I want it to do what I want, not what someone else thinks is the right thing to do)

preferably without the gnome 3.2 or kde desktop environments (no bling to get in the way just be useable/configurable)

two that I have tried are puppy linux (limited in available software) and slackware, (too big at a 4 gig download and above my linux level of expertise)

cheers

stripe
 
Old 12-13-2011, 07:14 PM   #2
frankbell
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In distros that do not allow a root login from the graphical display manager you can disable the GDM and boot to a command line; then you can enable a root login then startx from the command line.

How to disable the GDM will depend on the distro. I've done this with my Debian box because I use it mainly as a file server. Many times, when I log in, I am doing stuff that does not need a GUI, so I don't want to waste my time with it.

I see nothing wrong with logging on as root when you have a bunch of root stuff to do and want to get it over with, though I recommend strongly against doing all of one's computing as root.
 
Old 12-13-2011, 07:41 PM   #3
asimba
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It does make sense to use password when making changes to system configuration . It keeps your system stable rather then going on rampage later.
 
Old 12-13-2011, 07:50 PM   #4
flamelord
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it is possible to configure sudo not to ask for a password for a certain user, that would remove the annoyance of having to enter a password while still not requiring logging in as root.
 
Old 12-13-2011, 08:17 PM   #5
stripe
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Hi all

Thanks for the replys,

I think the worst instance was in either mint or ubuntu when trying to update flashplayer to version 11 (which was not carried in the software repository at that time) I downloaded the latest from adobe to manualy replace the earlier version in the file system, (usualy, usr/lib/mozzila) only to be told that I did not have permission to open the file system. sorry but this is my hardware and I have not agreed with any distro that they have the right to restrict my access to my machine on whatever grounds they choose (usualy security so they can frighten people into going along with them not allowing running as root.) the only linux machine I have heard of catching a virus was ubuntu 11.10 proving that not running as root made no difference at all.

sorry for the rant, but I feel that strongly about it

thats why my next distro will let me run as root or I wont entertain it.

stripe
 
Old 12-14-2011, 05:33 AM   #6
asimba
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I do not think it is hoax to coax people in to using password to install software.

Its for their own safety - Considering that Linux is gaining popularity - You would not want to taken by surprise. Adding/modifying repositories in some malicious way is/are side effects of allowing softwares to install and go on rampage. Prevention is better then cure

I strongly believe its for your own good.

I apologize. We can agree to disagree
 
Old 12-14-2011, 06:14 AM   #7
fingers99
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Easy way to do it -- given that you're aware of the dangers -- is to install Knoppix. Just download and burn the DVD, enter boot code
Code:
knoppix desktop=kde
and start from there.

Effectively, you're user knoppix and have full root permissions.

Downsides, security and, as Knoppix is based on at least 2 Debian releases, sooner or later you're likely to run into dependency issues.

Still, it's what I run on my EEE.
 
Old 12-14-2011, 08:15 AM   #8
linus72
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an up-to-date distro that will also allowyou to run as root is Porteus
http://porteus.org/

Slax has no users setup and is only root I believe
http://www.slax.org/
 
Old 12-14-2011, 09:22 AM   #9
flamelord
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I would like to point out that it is possible to log in as root on Ubuntu and Mint. If you just want temporary root power, you can use sudo for a single command or sudo -s, to start a session as root, to run graphical programs as root, you can use gtksudo. If you really must log in as root, you just need to use sudo to set root's password (it is locked by default). And you might need to modify the gdm settings to permit login as root.

Cheers
 
Old 12-14-2011, 12:35 PM   #10
TobiSGD
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Yes, it is your machine, you have the right to do with it what you want. But if you do that (running as root user only) please be so kind to keep your machine away from the net. We don't want to be bothered with spam mail being sent from your machine to our accounts. We don't want DDOS attacks on our servers or being brute forced by your hacked machine. As long as your machine doesn't bother us, do what you want.
 
Old 12-14-2011, 04:39 PM   #11
asipper
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can't you setup up sudo so it doesn't ask for a password?
 
Old 12-14-2011, 08:01 PM   #12
frankbell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asipper View Post
can't you setup up sudo so it doesn't ask for a password?
Yes, as someone else has pointed out, though I've never done it.

It does sort of defeat the purpose of password protection.
 
Old 12-14-2011, 08:30 PM   #13
RNanney56
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If you don't want the GUI you can boot in to single user mode
 
Old 12-15-2011, 07:44 PM   #14
chrism01
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TobiSGD ++
 
Old 12-16-2011, 12:35 AM   #15
opticks
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Backtrack

As stated in another member's reply, you can disable the login on many (any?) distros and go straight to the desktop.

If you're looking for a good distro with security and functionality that lets you run as root you should check out Backtrack 5 r1. It's based on Ubuntu and I use it all the time. I made another account but I never use it, I'm always on root because you have to be to use most of the tools it comes with.

backtrack-linux.org

-opticks
 
  


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