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Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

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View Poll Results: Which Disto??? [read the post first]
Suse 22 9.91%
Fedora Core 27 12.16%
Slackware 46 20.72%
Mandrake 14 6.31%
Solaris 1 0.45%
Ubuntu/Kubuntu 60 27.03%
Other [Specify] 52 23.42%
Voters: 222. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-16-2006, 01:30 AM   #46
apzc2529
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2006
Location: China
Distribution: Debian sid and KDE
Posts: 10

Rep: Reputation: 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by PlainDave
Hi,

I'm new to this forum and new to Linux. I used Debian and am getting ready to re-install it (long story). I'm curious... I don't see Debian mentioned in this thread. Is it not that popular? Is it not popular because it's more difficult to use, technically?

Also, I don't know where to post this question, but is there a way to use my wireless adapter and wireless router to install Linux, basically from a DOS prompt?

Thanks,
PlainDave
I have not used a wireless adapter and wireless router,so I can't help you.

But You can search the forum for your questions,or paste you question on the forum.
Another way is to join irc:irc.freenode.net/#debian,there are so many people who will like to help you with your problems.

BTW: I think the hardware is not contacted with what edition your linux is,but with the support of your kernel for your hardware.
 
Old 12-16-2006, 07:49 AM   #47
Lord Ghost
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Posts: 68

Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by r_avital
Question: Do I understand correctly, that Kubuntu is merely Ubuntu with KDE instead of Gnome? If so, Kubuntu is based on Debian but easier to use and with KDE? Is it impossible to run Gnome on Kubuntu or KDE on Ubuntu?

Oh, most important: And older RH9 (Shrike) did not install on my system as I have only a DVD drive (Installation reported "No CD ROM drive found") and has a single SATA drive (installation reported "No hard disk found" - was probably looking for IDE drives) - so forgive this newbie for asking, can I assume Kubuntu supports such hardware?

Thanks in advance.
Good questions...

First of all, Kubuntu is Ubuntu built with KDE in mind. HOWEVER, that said...Kubuntu is less stable than Ubuntu.

I've found that although it takes a slight learning curve to figure out the Gnome interface in Ubuntu, it is well worth it.

Yes, you can install Gnome on Kubuntu, just as you can install KDE on Ubuntu. Or a ton of other Desktop GUIs available.

I would personally suggest you stick with Ubuntu with the default GUI (Gnome) and learn it. It's not very hard to learn, and it's very comfortable after you get the hang of it. Not to mention, you can configure it to look like practically anything, respond like practically anything (I've seen people make Gnome look like Windows before, disturbing but funny!) and you'll find it very stable.

Later on, if you want, you can experiment with MANY desktops and see which one you really love. I was really taken by Enlightenment for quite awhile, but eventually went back to Gnome.

You can also run KDE programs within Gnome, or vice versa. So if you REALLY want that one KDE program that you JUST can't live without, install it. It's not hard.

Now, as for hardware - I run a pair of SATA I drives on a software RAID setup direct to the motherboard. If you're not aware, that's one of the worst setups in the world for Linux. Ubuntu runs just fine on it, however it won't see the drives as raid, it sees each one seperately, so be aware of that if you happen to use RAID.

I also have a DVD-RW and a DVD-R/CD-RW drive. Both show up perfectly and read/write without a single error in Ubuntu.

I hope this helps, and if you'd like more information/help, please feel free to ask.

Cheers,
Lord Ghost
 
Old 12-16-2006, 07:57 AM   #48
Lord Ghost
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Posts: 68

Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlainDave
Hi,

I'm new to this forum and new to Linux. I used Debian and am getting ready to re-install it (long story). I'm curious... I don't see Debian mentioned in this thread. Is it not that popular? Is it not popular because it's more difficult to use, technically?

Also, I don't know where to post this question, but is there a way to use my wireless adapter and wireless router to install Linux, basically from a DOS prompt?

Thanks,
PlainDave
Debian is not friendly. That's why it's not as popular. It's more for developers and testers. Add to that the fact that we have Ubuntu now, which is basically Debian for the masses, with more modern drivers and Kernel, and well, Debian? Who? What?

As for installing from a DOS prompt...I believe you can download a very minimalistic ISO for Debian that installs to a floppy which will allow a full on network installation. Please be aware that they take a lot longer to do.

You will most likely have to do some driver-fu and merge the driver for the wireless adapter into the setup, but it is possible.

One major question though: Why would you want to do that? Does this computer have like...NO CD-ROM drive at all? You can download the single CD ISO for Ubuntu, or you could have one mailed to you free of charge. It really IS a free OS.

Cheers,
Lord Ghost
 
Old 12-16-2006, 08:59 AM   #49
tallman19
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Location: Chisinau, Moldova
Distribution: Slackware 11
Posts: 47

Rep: Reputation: 15
any top distro is good.

I like slackware(it's easy on resources and you can install anything you want on it easier than if you were using ubuntu), but you'll find much more apps and howto's for Ubuntu, although I would prefer Debian.
 
Old 12-16-2006, 10:14 AM   #50
dinolinux
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2005
Location: Oslo, Norway
Distribution: Slackware 11, Solaris 10, Solaris 9, Sourcemage 0.9.6
Posts: 322

Rep: Reputation: 31
I've used most of the popular distros like Debian, Gentoo, Fedora, SUSE/OpenSUSE, Mandriva and *buntu. I've even tried Solaris. But I can't say I like any of them. I know some of you may not agree with me, but these are the reasons:
  • Debian - Stable branch gets outdated, releases are delayed and are infrequent
  • Gentoo - Used to be a nice distro, but then it got a graphical installer and that made it not as special anymore
  • SUSE/OpenSUSE - It was slow on a 3.2GHz Pentium 4, besides, too much SUSE-artwork imo
  • Mandriva - Nice distro, but more fitting for fresh Linux users
  • Ubuntu based - It has too many graphical configuration apps and I don't like the brown theme
  • Fedora - Used it a lot, also very nice, but sometimes too much graphical configuration apps
  • Solaris - Advanced and has lots of features, but it's slow and huge, especially on x86 hardware

If anyone is wondering, I'm currently using Sourcemage, it's fast and up to date. It gives the user the possibilty to configure his/her system as he/she wants. Some people don't like the magic approach, but if you don't look at the magic, it's a very nice distro. Of course it's not perfect, some packages are missing and things like Xgl are not fully implemented yet.
 
Old 12-16-2006, 10:48 AM   #51
quangtrung
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2004
Distribution: Mandrake, Fedora
Posts: 1

Rep: Reputation: 0
Being member almost one year, getting no message posted, I feel like I am useless here, but I did sometimes search for information at this website. I got the courage to join in a Linux Users Group in Hanoi time ago, doing a few activities to support Software Freedom Day with those guys who are really into Ubuntu distros while I am a fan of Suse, Mandrake then Fedora, got to know new stuff. I found out that Ubuntu is much easier to use than Fedora Core like most of the other people. The new Ubuntu 6.10 package is already in Vietnamese which would help my people in using this powerful distro.
 
Old 12-16-2006, 11:44 AM   #52
r_avital
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2006
Posts: 25

Rep: Reputation: 15
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by silkenphoenixx
Glad if I could be of help!
silkenphoenixx

Silken, and Lord Ghost, you've helped tremendously, thanks ever so much!

That was great information, and I'm definitely warming up to Ubuntu. At this point, I'll stick to my Mandriva for a few weeks or months, just long enough to learn some basics like commands, successfully log on without the graphic environment and manipulate config files, learn to compile and install something... since that's all part of the core Linux "competencies" I feel I need to work on at this point. But Ubuntu and/or Debian are on my list of the next great thing to try.

Thanks again to all
 
Old 12-16-2006, 01:55 PM   #53
EdNewbee
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Posts: 7

Rep: Reputation: 0
I use Puppy version 2.12 based on the stable 2.6.18.1 kernel. There is also Puppy 1.09CE based on kernel 2.4.

All Puppy versions can be ran off a Live CD /DVD in Multi-session mode so you can save everything back to the CD. It runs entirely in RAM (128Mb or more for Firefox to load right) so it is very fast. It is only about 80Mb compressed but has more programs pre-installed than even some much bigger distros. If you wish it can be installed to a hard drive as well.

Not only is it small and fast, 2.12 detected all of my hardware on two machines including my dial-up 56K modem. How many others do that? There are all sorts of programs available through the package manager as well.

I run version 109CE and version 2.12 side by side on a 7 year old laptop.

Best of all it is easier to use in my opinion than Ubuntu and the forum has great tech support. If you totally mess up the OS just delete the save file and start over. Get a nasty virus, no problem, just exit without saving and it's gone.

www.puppyos.com
 
Old 12-16-2006, 02:03 PM   #54
Netizen
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Location: Texas
Distribution: Slackware and Ubuntu
Posts: 355

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikieboy
I agree with rickh and pixellany. These which distro polls have been done to death. Can't the OP just google for the info?
Yes. But what is a forum without questions. And what is probably the number one questions everyone new to linux has?

"Which distro is for me?"

To the OP:

I vote Slackware. Easy to install, loads of fun to learn, and its fast and stable.
 
Old 12-16-2006, 05:52 PM   #55
djdoo!!
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Distribution: SuSE 10.1
Posts: 6

Rep: Reputation: 0
Greetings from Greece!!!

Wow!!!! How many different opinions!! Guys I just saw OpenSuSE 10.2 with xgl and compiz working and I remained with my mouth wide open for a great deal of time... KILL VISTAAAA!!!

Now for the topic... I think that the debians have the steady lead and this is completely reasonable for me, however their installation cds don't offer much things! In my opinion they are distros for complete newbies not only with Linux but with PCs generally!!! I ve tried Kubuntu 6.06 all went very well until I tried to compile a program from source. Being an old Mandrake user I typed make and console informed me No such file or directory!!!!!!
I got MAD!!! Then I realised that 'make' package was NOT install in my system and there was nothing to do about it in the installation!!
Also the system didn't have basic packages installed not to tell about devel or header stuff, nothing at all!!!
The conclusion: If you like Kubuntu-Ubuntu use the DVD to make the installation not the cds(of course the dvd has the same problem with cd but the <<extra>> packages can at least be found inside it) also the adept package manager was very comfuzing for me! If you use the cd be prepared for a lot of downloading and search to get something more of the fixated-poor installation Kubuntu-Ubuntu gives you! The Live stuff means nothing to me cause you cannot store anything on a cd! Only Mandriva's 2007 new Live Stick is something really usable and I recommend it to all the travellers!
Big troubles also with kernel updates and NO other window managers than Kubuntu=KDE and Ubuntu=Gnome
Kubuntu-Ubuntu is easy as long as you do not ask for more from what the basic installation offers and believe me it offers very few stuff!!

Maybe I am a bit overreacting but if you see what those SuSE distros(meaning suse 10.1 and opensuse 10.2)contain in their DVDs you will be lost completely in software... Not to tell about Packman's and Guru's packages nearly everything you could ever ask from an operating system!!! You can compile(meaning install from source) nearly anything!! So SuSE can be a very complete system even without an internet connection available!! A thing that other distros such as Kubuntu-Ubuntu cannot even imagine... Excellent for newbies and for advanced users!! Check OpenSuSE 10.2!!! THE VISTA KILLER!!!

Last edited by djdoo!!; 12-16-2006 at 06:07 PM.
 
Old 12-17-2006, 01:15 AM   #56
fotoguy
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2003
Location: Brisbane Queensland Australia
Distribution: KirraMail Live Email Server
Posts: 1,285

Rep: Reputation: 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by robert.wolfe
Hmm, going to have a Sparc port of it available by any chance? Also, where can one download this gem when it is released? Would love to try and get it set up under VMWare

The plan to release a installer version has now made way for a live cd version, complete with a graphical installer if someone feels the need to install to the hard drive. I'm not sure if this would suit VMWare, never used it before so I don't know how a boot cd is handled by VMWare. Plus the installer so far only partitions the drive automatically, there is no manually partitioning the drive at this stage, lots more programming for that, and I'm only learning at the same time.

Also having a few problems with the boot cd that decrypts the drive during startup for the encrypted installation, once that is sorted it should be too far a way. Where it can be downloaded from? I need to find a server somewhere and then find a friend that will allow me to use there connection since I have a really small download limit per month.

But if all goes well I hope to have something by mid january 07, made even ealier if i'm lucky. A Sparc version, probably not, I only use x86 systems but I may look into and see what's involved, one of the key goals of RDL is to make a desktop only based distro, for the newbie, home or small business user.

Like most people I spend what time I can spare on the project, but having to juggle between work and family, gets rather time consuming

Last edited by fotoguy; 12-17-2006 at 09:52 PM.
 
Old 12-17-2006, 01:32 AM   #57
Xeratul
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2006
Location: Debian Land
Posts: 1,728

Rep: Reputation: 155Reputation: 155
you forgot debian... why debian is not there ?

---------------
Ubuntu or debian ?
http://www.linux-france.org/macintos..._lp.html#AEN25
 
Old 12-17-2006, 01:35 AM   #58
Xeratul
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2006
Location: Debian Land
Posts: 1,728

Rep: Reputation: 155Reputation: 155
I recommand you Ubuntu

just for the repositories !! I love them compared to other distro. I tried Fedora too, and no way, debian based is for me cos its easy.

apt-get will be your best command
apt-cache search blabla

Enjoy
 
Old 12-17-2006, 08:09 AM   #59
Lord Ghost
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Posts: 68

Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by r_avital
Silken, and Lord Ghost, you've helped tremendously, thanks ever so much!

That was great information, and I'm definitely warming up to Ubuntu. At this point, I'll stick to my Mandriva for a few weeks or months, just long enough to learn some basics like commands, successfully log on without the graphic environment and manipulate config files, learn to compile and install something... since that's all part of the core Linux "competencies" I feel I need to work on at this point. But Ubuntu and/or Debian are on my list of the next great thing to try.

Thanks again to all
#1: Not a problem, very happy to help. That's what this post was all about, which apparently several people seem to think that asking for advice on which distro is best for newbies == "Please spout a ton of information about the distro you love, even if it takes 2 months to properly configure..."

#2: Some of the commands, but mainly the locations of files, are different from distro to distro. Learn some of the simple basic commands, to be sure, but don't worry too much about where things are located, how to edit files, etc...because Ubuntu is different in those regards - not by a lot, but enough.

Cheers,
Lord Ghost
 
Old 12-18-2006, 03:00 AM   #60
drlasterjr
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2006
Location: West Long Branch, NJ
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 11

Rep: Reputation: 0
I have been using Slackware since the early 90's. I have played around with several other distributions but found that for stability and flexibility nothing beats Slackware. I currently run a network of 20 systems that include a variety of servers most of which run Slackware Linux. The key thing I like about Slackware is that variety of software that is available and the number of Window managers that are available and "usable out of the box". As a result depending upon need you can run resource "heavy" window managers like KDE and GNOME or "light" windows managers like "fvwm2". And even under "fvwm2" I have found that all of the applications work just fine. And even if software is supplied as rpms, tar or other packages I still am able to install and build these extra software packages.

Like all Linux distributions, and every other OS available in the market, you do need to know what hardware you have, or you will get burned eventually, to get the most benefit from the software and hardware. I have often seen people say Slackware is hard to use and install but I have more problems installing other distributions than I have every had with Slackware. The other distributions all tried to force me to install and configure the system the way it wanted instead of letting me decide how to layout the systems.

So if you are new to Linux grab some old hardware and try different distributions - of course I recommend Slackware :-). When looking at Linux distributions it is also important to understand that the "distribution versions numbers" are meaningless when comparing different distribution. The key version numbers are the actual kernel version numbers. By way of example Slackware 11 supplies both 2.4.33.3, 2.6.17.13 and 2.6.18 kernels and either or all can be used on the system as needed. This has to do with Patrick J. Volkerding focus on usability, stability and keeping current.
 
  


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