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Old 12-28-2006, 10:46 AM   #16
MeeMaw
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Registered: Oct 2005
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I'm a newbie, and I first started with several live cd's.... PCLinuxOS, Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Mepis, Mandriva, and even DSL and Slax. I am currently running PCLOS and Ubuntu as a dual boot. The live cd's are definitely the way to go to make sure you can use your hardware. I have no knowledge of Fedora, having been told by another Linux user that you need a little more Linux knowledge to install it.
Good luck on your education! You will surely learn much!

MeeMaw
Registered Linux User # 433128
 
Old 12-28-2006, 11:39 AM   #17
johnboy68
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Registered: Dec 2006
Location: WV
Distribution: MEPIS
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Smile

I am still a "noob" and I have tried over 10 distros and have ended with MEPIS.

IMHO it is the best. I had PCLinuxOS installed for about 2 days and got rid of it over MEPIS. MEPIS worked out of the box.

http://www.mepis.org

I would suggest using the new Beta1 of SimplyMEPIS-32 Version 6.0-4, aka SystemUpdate1 (SU1). Even though it is a beta from their stable 6.0 version it is much improved on the "look and feel" side.

I have been running it for over 5 days on my primary home laptop with my wife and kids setup on it and it has been rock solid and working out of the box...

just my 2cents
 
Old 12-28-2006, 09:02 PM   #18
Cara25
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Registered: Mar 2006
Location: Nashville, Tennessee
Distribution: Salix 13.37 with KDE
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I started with Mandrake 9.x/Gnome in 2001. Never really learned it just had it to compare to MS Windows. I finally decided to go all Linux (no MS Windows). I started with Mandriva 2006/Gnome, made a mess out of it several times but learned alot and kept good notes. I now run Mandriva 2007 Power Pack as my primary machine with all the most modern convienances and it's wonderful, more friendly than 2006 and a breeze to install and maintain after learning on 2006. It's the periphials that will drive you crazy, do your homework, read and read the the HCL, use an HP printer and dedicate 1 machine to Linux, no dual boot, no Wine or VM now, maybe later, but install your prefered Linux and learn a whole new good feeling and meaning to personal computing.
Scott
 
Old 03-02-2007, 01:36 PM   #19
david312
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Registered: Sep 2003
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Smile

have tried ,kunbto,puppy,mandriva,slax,but really like pclinux 2007.because it has java already installed and you can use the live cd. to check everythin first.
 
Old 03-02-2007, 03:25 PM   #20
stevelincsuk
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Registered: Feb 2007
Location: Lincoln UK
Distribution: PCLinuxOS 2007 TR2
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PCLinux works for me, picked everything up nicely and has a good feel to it. Have also ran linux mint in a Virtual Machine which also picked everything up
 
Old 03-05-2007, 03:04 PM   #21
h1tman
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Registered: Jul 2003
Distribution: Slackware 11
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I think suggesting ditros like arch or gentoo to a newbie is disasterous. I think you need some firsthand knowledge of linux and your computer's hardware before tackling those distros.

My advice is do Ubuntu.

Slackware's installation is pretty straightforward if you already know the terminology.

Ubuntu(and other friendly linuxes) lets you know about every step of the installation, so that you can do ncurses based installations later on.

peace
 
Old 10-19-2007, 02:30 AM   #22
crazeebob2000
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Registered: Oct 2007
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Talking Linux noob, almost

I have PCLinuxOS on the second partition, i love it, only thing i use windoze for now is if i wanna play a game, cheers
 
Old 10-19-2007, 05:47 AM   #23
brianL
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Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
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Debian and Slackware are not all that difficult to install and run. I only got interested in computers 4 years ago, at the age of 58. In 2005 I did my first dual-boot: XP with Slackware 10.2 (given away with a mag). If you're nervous - try Ubuntu or any of the other "newbie" recommendations. In fact, try as many distros as you want. It's all a matter of personal preference.
 
Old 10-19-2007, 09:58 AM   #24
david312
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Smile hey

I tried lot off other dirtos but like pc linux it runs off the disc and had everything u need and is easy to install and configure.
 
Old 10-19-2007, 10:23 AM   #25
lin_myworld
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Registered: Oct 2007
Location: India
Distribution: Ubuntu 8.04
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well i think it doesnt matter what u r using..
i m a newbie and i m using suse10 and i also have tried many live cds n other versions and i think all r nearly similar..

so u can start with anyone and slowly u will find the most soothinn version..
 
Old 10-19-2007, 12:14 PM   #26
Dakota42784
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Registered: Oct 2007
Location: Kentucky, USA
Distribution: Ubuntu 904 I386
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Talking Which distribution of Linux , a newbie could start?

We'll, I am definately a Newbie!!!!!
I am running Kubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn on a Acer Aspire 5050 Laptop, Amd64 Processor. I am running Dual Boot with WinXP.
After Installation.........Had Sound, But after installing 116 Updates & booting into new Kernel.........No Sound.
Solved this by Booting into OLD Kernel.
I also like to burn Large Files such as 4.37 Movies, Games that are over 4.2 GB...........Guess What?.........K3B only lets you burn up to 4.0 GB................Grrrrrrrrrrrrrr
I even tried buying a 8.0 GB USB Flash Drive &..........Tried Copying the Movie to the Flash Drive........K3b Failed before copy was complete..........too large a file.........Grrrrrrrrrrrrr.
I Don't understand WHY...........they can't make an update to correct these problems.........God knows, I am not the only one who likes to do the above listed things.!!!!!!!!!!!!

Anyway, After reading a lot.........Found out that Ubuntu....Which uses GnomeBaker as their main cd/dvd writing program .......Will allow you to burn & or copy over 4.0 GB.
And......you can download & install it......into Kubuntu, which I did.

I haven't Tried burning anything yet over 4.0 GB in GnomeBaker......But They say it WILL.

I have made MANY Mistakes & will make many more probably.......But I am enjoying the Experience & the challenge.
What has Saved me MANY, MANY Times is:

Acronis True Image 11.0 Home (Best Backup program on planet).
I go back to Windows & Backup my Whole Hardrive & all Partitions (including Linux) & saved Backup on a second USB External Hardrive & when I screw up Linux.....I Restore My Backup.
I have Restored many, many times already.
Acronis.....doesn't miss anything.....if you cough, while in windows & or linux.....it will catch that & restore it.

I am not trying to promote Acronis........Ok, Just trying to explain what has worked for me, to help someone.
I want to get where I never have to go back to that other Operating system........just not there yet.
 
Old 10-19-2007, 12:48 PM   #27
masinick
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Registered: Apr 2002
Location: Clinton Township, MI
Distribution: Debian, antiX, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, and many others
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You have to consider the audience

Quote:
Originally Posted by mjjohansen View Post
I... partially agree.
It is often difficult to see where people are coming from.
I am a LUG captain, arranging install events roughly once a month. I don't mind suggesting installing Debian to beginners, but I think that requires an experienced Linux user around when it happens.
I am a software engineer, so I consider installing any software to be "within scope", to use common terminology. I like Debian based systems the most. I find they strike the best balance for me between simplicity, performance, balance, and maintainability. The plain Debian installer has improved to the point where it is not totally daunting as it once was, but it still depends on what and who the audience is whether or not that is an appropriate first system to use. A live CD that uses Debian repositories might be appropriate though. Ubuntu and MEPIS are two good examples of distributions that are initially loaded by inserting the CD and booting the system, what we call "Live CDs".

In fact, I think a great place to start is by obtaining a Live CD, inserting it into a system running something else, then reboot. The Live CD ought to put the new user right into a usable system within five to ten minutes. If not, then the hardware the person is using may not be suitable for learning, unless the individual is extremely persistent and figures out how to get the devices working or how to change to devices that will work.

Ever since the Ubuntu project moved to the use of Live CDs they really made it easier for anyone to try out their software. Since they are based on Debian packaging, they also make it really easy to manage an existing system, should one decide to actually install it on their system. Any system that offers a Live CD option is really the easiest entry point, in my opinion, but it certainly is not the only entry point.

About the point of jumping right in with both feet and instead using a system that practically forces you to understand what is going on, that can certainly give you a deeper understanding faster, but it can also be overwhelming to someone who is trying to grasp a different technology. That path may be suitable to a few people, but I suggest that the audience for such systems is overwhelmingly the experienced crowd. These systems are more for deep learning and fine tuned systems once you have a general appreciation for the technology and what the systems are capable of.

Slackware and plain Debian are not terribly difficult to install, but they do require many steps that are completely automated in other systems. Gentoo Linux, Sabayon, Linux from Scratch, Arch Linux, and systems where you have to tell the installation program exactly what you want are great for flexibility, but for 98% of the audience, that is asking way too much. Only those that want to dig in deeply right from the start should even attempt to work with such systems. They are great; they give you precisely what you want. The problem is that you have to completely KNOW what you want. Most beginners do not have any idea what they want. They want to see what a system can do, then as they begin to learn what the systems are capable of, they start to establish what they want. Everyone wants certain basics; virtually any general purpose system can provide those things. To get beyond that requires learning and experience. I suggest growing toward that place is the best strategy for a large, general audience. There are exceptions to everything, but assuming very little makes learning at your own pace easier, and that is why so many "easy to install, easy to use" systems have emerged. They make good sense for the beginner, and there are many of them that do a really good job.
 
Old 10-19-2007, 01:18 PM   #28
masinick
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Registered: Apr 2002
Location: Clinton Township, MI
Distribution: Debian, antiX, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, and many others
Posts: 589
Blog Entries: 15

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I think this method matches the largest audience

Quote:
Originally Posted by MeeMaw View Post
I'm a newbie, and I first started with several live cd's.... PCLinuxOS, Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Mepis, Mandriva, and even DSL and Slax. I am currently running PCLOS and Ubuntu as a dual boot. The live cd's are definitely the way to go to make sure you can use your hardware. I have no knowledge of Fedora, having been told by another Linux user that you need a little more Linux knowledge to install it.
Good luck on your education! You will surely learn much!

MeeMaw
Registered Linux User # 433128
I think your approach is likely to work for a large percentage of the total audience. You can dig in and get the really flexible systems right off the bat, but for most people, that is asking too much. There are too many questions to answer and that makes them too intimidating for over ninety percent of the people.

I say start with an approach similar to yours. If it seems appealing, then branch out and try a lot of systems. As you learn, try a few of the more flexible, but more challenging systems. Then based on what you learn, go with the one or ones that best represent the way you like to work. There are so many options because people like to work differently. The flexibility and number of choices of distributions confuses many but it is one of the key reasons why people look - and find - the system that can be configured just the way they want it.
 
  


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