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Old 11-07-2012, 07:17 PM   #1
Mike.JIn@Shanghai
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Lightbulb which command can show the result of the linux you are using?


Hi, every one.
I have a question.

which command can show the distribution of the linux you are using?

Since there are so many distributions of linux in using in the world. For example rhel, suse linux,
Ubuntu and so on.

I have a method
click ctrl+alt+F2.
the interface will show the distribution you are using currently.

Could you tell me which command typed in the terminal
and the result will appear immediately.

Last edited by Mike.JIn@Shanghai; 11-07-2012 at 07:18 PM.
 
Old 11-07-2012, 07:32 PM   #2
yancek
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One or both of the commands below should work.

cat /etc/release
cat /etc/issue
 
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Old 11-07-2012, 07:44 PM   #3
Mike.JIn@Shanghai
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Thank you

cat /etc/release does not work.
but 'cat /etc/issue' works successfuly
 
Old 11-07-2012, 07:51 PM   #4
TobiSGD
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Many distros (even Slackware) nowadays have the file /etc/os-release for this purpose, with information about distro, version and even addresses for support.
 
Old 11-07-2012, 08:46 PM   #5
towheedm
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If you have the lsb-release package installed, it can also provide that info:
Code:
lsb_release -a
No LSB modules are available.
Distributor ID:	Debian
Description:	Debian GNU/Linux 6.0.6 (squeeze)
Release:	6.0.6
Codename:	squeeze
 
Old 11-07-2012, 09:13 PM   #6
shivaa
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You can use "uname" command with -a option, it stands for "Unix name" & I hope it will work on all Unix based distro available.
Code:
example% uname -a
 
Old 11-07-2012, 10:20 PM   #7
catkin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shivaa View Post
You can use "uname" command with -a option, it stands for "Unix name" & I hope it will work on all Unix based distro available.
Code:
example% uname -a
At least on SLackware 13.37 uname -a does not show the distro:
Code:
c@CW9:~$ uname -a
Linux CW9 2.6.37.6-c1 #1 Wed Jun 20 10:48:32 BST 2012 i686 Intel(R) Atom(TM) CPU N450   @ 1.66GHz GenuineIntel GNU/Linux
There is no single technique that works on all distros. The rkhunter shellscript function rkh_dat_get_os_info is a good example of what is required. Available via http://rkhunter.cvs.sourceforge.net/
 
Old 11-08-2012, 12:57 AM   #8
chrism01
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I use the wildcard approach
Code:
cat /etc/*release*
to get the distro+version.

As above, uname -a gives the kernel version info
 
  


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