LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 08-01-2007, 01:36 AM   #16
jay73
Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Location: Belgium
Distribution: Ubuntu 11.04, Debian testing
Posts: 5,019

Rep: Reputation: 130Reputation: 130

Quote:
a message popped up asking if I wanted to keep all the contents of the preexisting root folder, or to overwrite. That was how I understood it anyway.
Did you format that partition before you started installing PCLinux? If so, then the message is perfectly normal. If you point an installer to a partition that it is already formatted, it will assume that it isn't a new partition but one that is in use. Such messages can be ignored without any consequences.
 
Old 08-01-2007, 07:01 AM   #17
monsm
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2005
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 568

Rep: Reputation: 37
I still think a separate boot partition would be easier.

But in this situation, pixellany, with 2 Linux OSes each just on 1 partition each. Grub is installed on the first one. Is it still a single menu.lst file for it to use on that partition?
So effectively when you install the second os you give the first installations partition as boot partition and the new partition as the new root.

Is that it, or am I a confused, non-rocket scientist?
 
Old 08-01-2007, 08:24 AM   #18
pixellany
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Annapolis, MD
Distribution: Arch/XFCE
Posts: 17,802

Rep: Reputation: 728Reputation: 728Reputation: 728Reputation: 728Reputation: 728Reputation: 728Reputation: 728
Quote:
Originally Posted by monsm
I still think a separate boot partition would be easier.

But in this situation, pixellany, with 2 Linux OSes each just on 1 partition each. Grub is installed on the first one. Is it still a single menu.lst file for it to use on that partition?
So effectively when you install the second os you give the first installations partition as boot partition and the new partition as the new root.

Is that it, or am I a confused, non-rocket scientist?
GRUB only uses one menu.lst file--the one on the partition to which GRUB is pointed when it is installed. (This gets "hard-coded into the code in the MBR)

When you install another OS on a new partition, it cares nothing about the other partitions---it simply needs to know where it's "/" will be.

The first installation's partition is only important if that is where GRUB has been told to look for its files. Once the 2nd OS is booted, that partition does not need to be mounted to the tree for the new OS.
Quote:
Grub is installed on the first one.
GRUB is installed in the MBR, with "stage files" in the /boot directory of the partition to which it is pointed as described above. It also might be in the boot sector of that partition--still pointing to the same place.
 
Old 08-01-2007, 11:37 AM   #19
dacotre
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2007
Posts: 4

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Smile

Alright, I finally got it.
It was much simpler than I expected, from the amount of debate over it. I just copied the important information from the default entry on the old partition's GRUB menu, putting it in as another option in the new. IT was odd, though, because the two menu files had different formats. The one on hda5 defined a BOOT_IMAGE, which seemed to be the same as the TITLE. Hda1 didn't.


Thank you all for your help.
 
Old 08-01-2007, 12:14 PM   #20
jay73
Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Location: Belgium
Distribution: Ubuntu 11.04, Debian testing
Posts: 5,019

Rep: Reputation: 130Reputation: 130
There is one more thing you need to be aware of: kernel updates. The distro that has its grub in the MBR will automatically update its boot entry but the other one will not (because it hasn't got any control over the MBR). So, let's say you put PCLinuxOS grub in the MBR - this means that PCLinuxOS will take care of itself and update grub when it gets a new kernel; however, when Ubuntu gets a new kernel, this will not be reflected in grub; you'll need to take care of that yourself. Not that it takes genius to do so: just take note of the new name of the kernel and the initrd and use these instead of the original entries. That being said, Ubuntu and PCLinux tend to be rather conservative with kernel updates so it's not something that should be bothering you all the time (contrary to something like Fedora, which receives a kernel update every few weeks).

Last edited by jay73; 08-01-2007 at 12:16 PM.
 
Old 08-01-2007, 01:27 PM   #21
saikee
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne UK
Distribution: Any free distro.
Posts: 3,398
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 112Reputation: 112
jay73 in post #5 has the solution for the OP IMO.

Every Linux needs a home to store its filing system and that is the root or "/".

The PCLinuxOS would have no problem if the OS selects hda5, edit it to mount /, select a filing system like Ext3 for it to format to and click "next" or "ok". That is how I installed my PCLinuxOS. In fact that is "the" way I installed every Linux!

There are a few odd distros that can only install in a partition previously formatted (Think Puppy is one of them). So if a partition isn't detected then by formatting the partition will change the situation.

Pixellany insistance that there is no need to have a separate /boot in post #3 is true. /boot just be a subdirectory to "/". I for one never have a separate /boot partition in the 100+ Linux I installed.

Having a /boot separately is Red Hat and distros that sell you a LVM because no boot loader cam read a LVM and so the separate /boot is needed for Lilo or Grub to go inside to load the kernel. The kernel then loads the driver to read the LVM.

In the current case the OP has only one partition of hda5 and so even Red Hat cannot create a LVM and the /boot can be just a standard subdirectory to "/", no different to /home, /usr, /etc etc.
-----------------------------------
By the way and at least in Ubuntu when it updates the kernel the Grub's menu.lst is also revised automatically.

There isn't any worry on updates affecting Grub because the Grub we are using has long ceased to have any support. Grub 0.97 is officially history and this latest version is possibly over two years old. GNU/Grub has since switched their attention to Grub2 but no documentation has been offered in the last two years.

Last edited by saikee; 08-01-2007 at 01:38 PM.
 
  


Reply

Tags
multiboot


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
what partitions(mount points) can you reuse in a multiple boot linux system? scottk88 Linux - General 5 08-01-2005 12:49 PM
PQMagic8 destroyed linux partitions. Unable to mount root fs cristip Debian 2 02-04-2005 10:22 PM
PQMagic8 destroyed linux partitions. Unable to mount root fs cristip Linux - General 1 02-04-2005 02:07 PM
mount and r/w partitions in non-root Alfexy Slackware 2 10-21-2004 04:49 PM
mount windows partitions so users (and not just root) can read it TheOneAndOnlySM Slackware 1 10-10-2003 06:20 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:38 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration