LinuxQuestions.org
Review your favorite Linux distribution.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 10-05-2008, 02:10 AM   #1
VJgamer
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2008
Posts: 4

Rep: Reputation: 0
Where can I find a Newbie Guide to Linux?


Is there a pretty comprehensive newbie's guide to linux available somewhere. I am a pretty advanced computer user, but I guess mostly windows. I know domain controllers, and Microsoft terminal services like the back of my hand (maybe thats my problem), but I just can't figure out linux. If you can answer the above question, then just ignore the rest.

I am really lost here. Compared to Windows, Linux is complicated. Just try to find the second partition of my hard drive proved to be rather difficult. Is it /mnt, /dev? No it's /media.

I need like a FAQ for linux. What are all those different root folders? /usr, /bin, /etc, /rundir and so on...

Also, I found an app that I want to install, but there is no .deb file (I am running ubuntu). There is a .tar.bz2, and a .tar.gz. Which one do I pick, what's the difference, and how in the heck do I install that? I have seen ./configure && make && make install. Mowst of the time I get errors, but if not, great, where did it install, and how do I run it?

I really wish I could spend more time with linux, but it is impossible because I cannot use it for work. Seems how it is nearly impossible to setup an l2tp client vpn on linux and/or no remote desktop clients that support TS Gateway I am out of luck.

The only thing that has been pleasant was installing Opera. There was a .deb, and it put a shortcut under Internet. I managed to get compiz-fusion installed and working! Why doesn't it automatically come with CCSM? I hate the fact that I have to read how to do EVERYTHING from a forum.

I truly walked into this with an open mind, but it takes too much effort to do the smallest things. I have wasted an entire day trying to set-up a VPN that took 10 minutes on Windows.

One last rant... When Linux freezes, is there anything you can do?
 
Old 10-05-2008, 02:23 AM   #2
Nylex
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 7,464

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
This may be what you're looking for.
 
Old 10-05-2008, 02:31 AM   #3
VJgamer
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2008
Posts: 4

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thank you for replying so fast, I will look over this FIRST thing in the morning. There are a lot of aspects about linux that I do like.

1. It's free!

2. Drivers, Drivers, Drivers! Everything on my computer worked on the first boot! Everything from printer to blutooth adapter.

3. Its different. I like being different sometimes.

4. Boots fast.

5. Compiz-Fusion is pretty cool!

I'm sure its like most things in life... It gets better with patience!
 
Old 10-05-2008, 03:05 AM   #4
ankit_mcgill
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2005
Location: Montreal
Distribution: OpenSuse 10.3
Posts: 65

Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by VJgamer View Post
Thank you for replying so fast, I will look over this FIRST thing in the morning. There are a lot of aspects about linux that I do like.

1. It's free!

2. Drivers, Drivers, Drivers! Everything on my computer worked on the first boot! Everything from printer to blutooth adapter.

3. Its different. I like being different sometimes.

4. Boots fast.

5. Compiz-Fusion is pretty cool!

I'm sure its like most things in life... It gets better with patience!
welcome to linux ... you might want to buy a linux newbie book .. would definitely come handy as a reference !
 
Old 10-05-2008, 03:51 AM   #5
khinch
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Location: Carlisle, UK
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 73

Rep: Reputation: 18
The .deb files you have already mentioned are the closest thing you will find to a Windows .exe, but there are still differences. If you see a program wrapped up as a tar.gz it is most likely source code, and the commands configure, make and make install are what you need to do to compile it into a working program. Generally though, most of the programs you need for day-to-day usage will be found in the software repositories - something most Windows users have never heard of (I hadn't). Repositories are huge libraries of pre-compiled programs, free to use for everyone, and your distro comes with some already enabled. Using Ubuntu you should already have access to the massive Universe repository. Try opening syaptic (I forget the ones available on Ubuntu) and typing software package names into the search field, or just browse the categories, there's tons in there.

Nylex's suggestion of checking out Rute is a good one also, lots of useful information in there.

Anytime you feel frustrated at how hard everything is in Linux, just think back to when you first started using Windows. You didn't just know all that stuff, you have accrued it over years.
 
Old 10-05-2008, 03:57 AM   #6
craigevil
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Location: OZ
Distribution: Debian Sid
Posts: 4,734
Blog Entries: 12

Rep: Reputation: 461Reputation: 461Reputation: 461Reputation: 461Reputation: 461
When I first started trying to learn Linux I put all the sites I found useful on a webpage. You might consider doing the same.
http://www.geocities.com/reverendsky/learninglinux.html
 
Old 10-05-2008, 04:22 AM   #7
salasi
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2007
Location: Directly above centre of the earth, UK
Distribution: SuSE, plus some hopping
Posts: 4,060

Rep: Reputation: 883Reputation: 883Reputation: 883Reputation: 883Reputation: 883Reputation: 883Reputation: 883
Quote:
Originally Posted by VJgamer View Post
Is there a pretty comprehensive newbie's guide to linux available somewhere.
There are many actually and each has a slightly different focus (what a cli user wants is probably quite different to what a gui user wants). If you don't like the one that has been sugested try google for linux tutorial or ask a more specific question here again.
Quote:
I am a pretty advanced computer user, but I guess mostly windows. I know domain controllers, and Microsoft terminal services like the back of my hand (maybe thats my problem), but I just can't figure out linux. If you can answer the above question, then just ignore the rest.

I am really lost here. Compared to Windows, Linux is complicated. Just try to find the second partition of my hard drive proved to be rather difficult. Is it /mnt, /dev? No it's /media.
As suggested earlier, windows ain't easy, either. I haven't really used windows for 5+ years, and then mainly NT and I had to go back to XP recently, and boy was it a struggle! And that was just to re-learn stuff I'd known 5 years ago.

Have a look at the Linux Documentation Project.
Quote:
I need like a FAQ for linux. What are all those different root folders? /usr, /bin, /etc, /rundir and so on...
There is a Linux Filesystem Heirarchy standard, which doesn't specify absolutely everything, but is very comprehensive.

Quote:
Also, I found an app that I want to install, but there is no .deb file (I am running ubuntu). There is a .tar.bz2, and a .tar.gz. Which one do I pick, what's the difference, and how in the heck do I install that? I have seen ./configure && make && make install. Mowst of the time I get errors, but if not, great, where did it install, and how do I run it?
Err, I don't know how to put this gently, but the probability is that you are wrong about their being no .deb (You would need to say what app). The probability is that there is a .deb but as it is hiding in one of the non-default repos you need to configure your system to have a wider range of repositories enabled in order to find it. In a few cases when there is genuinely no .deb available, you do still have to do it yourself, though.

Quote:
I truly walked into this with an open mind, but it takes too much effort to do the smallest things. I have wasted an entire day trying to set-up a VPN that took 10 minutes on Windows.
There is definitely a mindset problem; If you try to do stuff 'the windows way' and force Linux to behave like a low cost version of windows, you'll have some success, but at a cost; If you adopt the ways of working on Linux (and/or Unix), you'll be more succesful, happier and enjoy it more. I know this is more 'zen-like' than direct, type-this-command advice, but it is true.

Quote:
One last rant... When Linux freezes, is there anything you can do?
I'm sure it can be cured, but more information will be needed. Oh, and you'll need to start a new thread for that as it has gone a bit off topic for this one.
 
Old 10-05-2008, 07:13 AM   #8
Total-MAdMaN
Member
 
Registered: May 2008
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 306

Rep: Reputation: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by VJgamer View Post
Compared to Windows, Linux is complicated.
That's because you're used to Windows. Anyone that had only used Linux and had to use Windows would find it equally complicated.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VJgamer View Post
Just try to find the second partition of my hard drive proved to be rather difficult. Is it /mnt, /dev? No it's /media.
Different distros partition the drive (or use existing partitions) in different ways. I usually advise people to do their own partitioning if they know how, instead of using the software that came with their installer, so they know where their partitions can be located.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VJgamer View Post
Also, I found an app that I want to install, but there is no .deb file (I am running ubuntu). There is a .tar.bz2, and a .tar.gz. Which one do I pick, what's the difference, and how in the heck do I install that? I have seen ./configure && make && make install. Mowst of the time I get errors, but if not, great, where did it install, and how do I run it?
.tar.bz2 and .tar.gz files are usually archives containing source code. ./configure && make && make install is a command (actually, three commands strung together) to compile the source code. Any errors you get while running the command is due to other files the program relies on (called dependencies) not being installed. The best way to install a program is by using your distro's package manager, as that will install all the dependencies for you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VJgamer View Post
I hate the fact that I have to read how to do EVERYTHING from a forum.
Your distro should have a manual available on its site. That should take you through the basics of how to get everything set up, install programs, etc. Only when you have problems will you need to ask on a forum, and as Linux is community based you'll find a lot of knowledgeable people willing to assist.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VJgamer View Post
I truly walked into this with an open mind, but it takes too much effort to do the smallest things. I have wasted an entire day trying to set-up a VPN that took 10 minutes on Windows.
Linux is not Windows, and thinking they're similar will hinder your ability to learn. Once you're used to Linux, you'll find that a lot of things are far easier to do than in Windows, and the ones that are more difficult are because they're a lot more customisable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VJgamer View Post
One last rant... When Linux freezes, is there anything you can do?
It depends what you mean by Linux freezing. I'm guessing you probably mean the GUI. If that's the case, you can just press Ctrl+Alt+Backspace to kill it. On some distros that should immediately start the GUI again. If it doesn't, you should just be able to type startx to get it running.
 
Old 10-05-2008, 07:29 AM   #9
Count Zero
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2008
Distribution: Debian wheezy
Posts: 130

Rep: Reputation: 15
If you're old-fashioned like me and like to have a book to leaf through instead of reading from web pages I'd recommend 'Linux phrasebook' by Scott Granneman. I found it very helpful when I started out a couple of years ago. It goes through basic administration using the command line and I still find myself browsing it every now and then. 'Linux in a nutshell' is also good. It's a more comprehensive overlook and gives you not only the basic commands but also some stuff about Grub, partitioning and what not. Of course, most of the stuff, if not all, that is in these books are available just by installing the OS, through the 'man' command but of course, you have to know which command you want to use in order to use its man page.

/CZ
 
Old 10-05-2008, 09:23 AM   #10
linuxer8786
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2008
Posts: 43

Rep: Reputation: 15
I think mr google is best

Last edited by Tinkster; 10-30-2010 at 03:46 PM.
 
Old 10-05-2008, 11:24 AM   #11
VJgamer
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2008
Posts: 4

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by salasi View Post
Err, I don't know how to put this gently, but the probability is that you are wrong about their being no .deb (You would need to say what app). The probability is that there is a .deb but as it is hiding in one of the non-default repos you need to configure your system to have a wider range of repositories enabled in order to find it. In a few cases when there is genuinely no .deb available, you do still have to do it yourself, though.
Actually, you are quite right, I found two sites that have many packages not available in the repositories. (getdeb.net and launchpad.net) This was mostly in reference to programs that have been updated, but the old version is in the repository.

Thanks Nylex for suggesting that site it looks pretty comprehensive, Thanks also craigevil, your site has lots of resources I'll be looking over.

I enjoyed reading over your replies, thank you for all your helpful (and critical , but it was needed) input. It's a learning process... I'll get there.
 
Old 10-05-2008, 08:11 PM   #12
chrism01
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Location: Sydney
Distribution: Centos 6.8, Centos 5.10
Posts: 17,286

Rep: Reputation: 2347Reputation: 2347Reputation: 2347Reputation: 2347Reputation: 2347Reputation: 2347Reputation: 2347Reputation: 2347Reputation: 2347Reputation: 2347Reputation: 2347
This is also a good short read for you: http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm
 
Old 10-06-2008, 06:57 AM   #13
ghodkiller
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Distribution: SuSE / Mandrake
Posts: 48

Rep: Reputation: 15
i remember i`ve learned linux from google, i think it` the fastet way. so search for help there, you will be amazed how many step by step tutorials you will find

Debian

Last edited by ghodkiller; 10-19-2008 at 07:27 AM.
 
Old 10-06-2008, 07:14 AM   #14
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 12,615
Blog Entries: 26

Rep: Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986
Hi,

GNU/Linux is not M$Windows!

You've been given some good advice. I would suggest that you look at 'Linux in a Nutshell', 'Free GNU/Linux Books', 'Rute Tutorial & Exposition', 'Linux Newbie Admin Guide' & 'Linux Command Guide' to get some good background.

These links and others can be found at 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!

Loads of online reference for your long winter nights.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Will I Be OK With A Newbie Guide To Fedora Core 6 As First Linux Disto? aaron4katie Fedora 14 12-30-2006 07:31 AM
Ultimate Linux Newbie Guide gnu2tux Linux - Newbie 15 11-18-2005 08:42 PM
How it will be... if you find a smart beginners guide to linux in this site? anindyanuri LQ Suggestions & Feedback 2 02-19-2005 06:54 AM
Newbie Linux Guide Online judge_neo Linux - Newbie 2 11-11-2004 11:42 AM
Linux Newbie starter guide deepsix Linux - Software 4 08-21-2003 06:19 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:58 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration