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Old 03-19-2009, 02:33 PM   #1
Mr. Spock
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Cool What version is best for a newbie?


I am really quite a newbie to Linux, so new I am still using Windows XP, and am really quite scared to changeover. Any auggestions for Windows friendly user. Are there any to save directly on my computer that require an ISO file, because I dont know how to burn CDs or DvD's either
 
Old 03-19-2009, 02:44 PM   #2
i92guboj
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Spock View Post
I am really quite a newbie to Linux, so new I am still using Windows XP, and am really quite scared to changeover. Any auggestions for Windows friendly user.
Ubuntu, SuSE, Fedora and Mandriva seems to be popular amongst newcomers these days, in no particular order I think. You can always download a livecd for each one and give them a try before installing to get a taste.

Quote:
Are there any to save directly on my computer that require an ISO file, because I dont know how to burn CDs or DvD's either
I don't understand that question. When you download an ISO file you do need to burn it to a CD or a DVD. You can do that with nero or your regular burning program in windows, BUT make sure that you burn it as image, and not as a regular file, because otherwise it won't work. In other words, after you burn the iso file to the disk, you should not see the iso file when you open the disk. Instead you should see the contents of the iso file, which will usually be a lot of files and directories/folders.
 
Old 03-19-2009, 02:56 PM   #3
beachboy2
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Smile

Mr Spock,

Welcome to Linux Questions.

Look at this tutorial for Ubuntu 8.10:
http://www.howtoforge.com/the-perfec...op-ubuntu-8.10

Scroll down this link to “Linux” for quick access to step-by-step Linux distribution installation guides and tutorials:
http://www.dedoimedo.com/computer_software.html#linux

I recommend K3b for burning a CD or DVD.
Tutorial:
http://www.raiden.net/?cat=2&aid=518

If in doubt call up your friends Mr Google and Mr Wikipedia.

Above all, do not be afraid to ask your questions here at LQ.
 
Old 03-19-2009, 02:59 PM   #4
Maligree
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Perhaps first play around with a live distro?
 
Old 03-19-2009, 03:02 PM   #5
Udi
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If you absolutely can't handle burning CDs then there is also an option to order them via mail from linuxcd.org or osdisc.com or others... You can order many and save on shipment and handling and also be able to try many Linuxes until you decide what you like best.

In addition to the Linuxes that were recommended in the post before me, I also recommend Linux Mint (version 6 which is nicknamed "Felicia"). It comes pre-installed with almost everything you'll ever want, including all multimedia playing capabilities and it is very friendly to Windows users.

Have fun using Linux
 
Old 03-19-2009, 03:30 PM   #6
Paul8032
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Udi View Post
If you absolutely can't handle burning CDs then there is also an option to order them via mail from linuxcd.org or osdisc.com or others... You can order many and save on shipment and handling and also be able to try many Linuxes until you decide what you like best.

In addition to the Linuxes that were recommended in the post before me, I also recommend Linux Mint (version 6 which is nicknamed "Felicia"). It comes pre-installed with almost everything you'll ever want, including all multimedia playing capabilities and it is very friendly to Windows users.

Have fun using Linux
+1. Buying a few live cds & trying it that way is a good "risk-free" approach.

And I run Linux Mint at home, because it keeps my not especially linux-enthusiast family happy

Last edited by Paul8032; 03-19-2009 at 03:31 PM. Reason: typo
 
Old 03-19-2009, 03:36 PM   #7
brianL
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Have a look for Linux magazines, such as Linux Format, they regularly give away distros on CDs or DVDs.
 
Old 03-19-2009, 04:08 PM   #8
johnsfine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Spock View Post
I am really quite a newbie to Linux, so new I am still using Windows XP, and am really quite scared to changeover. Any auggestions for Windows friendly user.
In my opinion, Mepis is best for a newbie (and for quite a few others as well).

Quote:
I dont know how to burn CDs or DvD's either
I found Nero and other popular and/or pre installed CD/DVD burning programs very confusing. Then I discovered ImgBurn. It is free and much less confusing. It is simple and reliable. I can't imagine why a Windows user would want to use any other burning program.
http://www.imgburn.com/

When burning a CD or DVD, you do need to know that "writing files to" a CD or DVD is a different operation from "burning an image file" to a CD. ImgBurn does make the distinction clear (though the current version uses the phrase "Write image file to disc".

When you write ordinary files to a CD, the software creates a new .iso file to wrap all those files, then burns that .iso to the CD. If you already have a .iso and copy it to CD in that mode, it gets wrapped an extra time and doesn't work, so you need to be sure you are using the mode of your CD writing software that simply burns the .iso to disk as an image. In the current version of ImgBurn that mode is called "Write image file to disc" while the mode that wraps your file(s) in another layer of .iso before writing is called "Write files/folders to disc". That second mode is useful and easy in case you want to backup a bunch of data to CD or DVD. The first in case you downloaded an .iso file for Linux or other CD or DVD.

Last edited by johnsfine; 03-19-2009 at 04:10 PM.
 
Old 03-19-2009, 04:47 PM   #9
thorkelljarl
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There are many.

This is the live-cd list. There are many choices.

http://www.livecdlist.com/

If you are using Windows, this CD burner program is easy to use for burning an ISO image file.

http://cdburnerxp.se/

The standard advice. Burn at a slow speed on a good quality disk. Most linux live-cds will have a media checking function, but if the CD boots it is probably good.

Google will tell you more, much more.

Good Luck
 
Old 03-19-2009, 05:21 PM   #10
XenaneX
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Mr. Spock

There are a couple of web sites that help you choose a distro by asking you a series of questions. It's not perfect but one way to help make a decision. Coming from Windows98 I felt right at home with PCLinuxOS. It is KDE based and it is my favorite. That doesn't guarantee you'll like it or KDE but it's my opinion only.

Check here for the low low price of $1.95 per CD in most cases:
http://www.osdisc.com/cgi-bin/view.c...inux/pclinuxos

Good luck.
 
Old 03-19-2009, 05:35 PM   #11
pljvaldez
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You can also try UNetbootin or Wubi which will install linux as if it was a windows program. What they do is install linux to a large file (like 5GB) on your windows partition, then you can select it at boot time. Uninstall is easy as going to Add/Remove Programs in Windows and removing the install.

EDIT: apparently UNetbootin installs to a separate partition/USB drive, so you can't just use add/remove programs in Windows...

Last edited by pljvaldez; 03-19-2009 at 05:38 PM.
 
Old 03-19-2009, 06:16 PM   #12
JaksoDebr
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For burning CD/DVD's you should use K3b, which is actually part of many distributions. You can use it to burn from IO files, to create data/video/audio disks on your own, or even create audio DVD's (if your car's player supports it). See http://k3b.org/

If you do not have any specific reason to switch to Linux, then rather start out with a LiveCD distribution - that will give room for testing, without making any final decisions.

Linux Archive

Last edited by JaksoDebr; 04-02-2009 at 05:17 AM.
 
Old 03-20-2009, 03:07 AM   #13
salasi
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As you don't say physically where you are, it is difficult to give advice that is particular to one physical location. However, many Linux magazines do have 'free' (free, provided that you buy the magazine) distro of the month DVDs included with the mag and that can be a good way of getting both a magazine and a distro to try. If you are prepared to buy a mag or two a month for a few moths, you will soon have a collection of them.

There are people who sell DVDs. I don't know who to recommend, because I don't know where you are, but choosing someone in the same country as yourself seem like a reasonable start.

Live CDs are a good idea, you just have to be careful about making the CD 'bootable' and not just a copy of the data. The terminology for this varies amongst programs so it is a matter of seeing what your CD/DVD burning program offers. The other issue here is that you have to ensure that the 'boot order' in your bios has to be set so that your computer looks to boot from CD/DVD before it boots from the hard disk.
 
Old 03-20-2009, 09:47 AM   #14
krishnasut
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