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Old 07-22-2007, 05:40 AM   #1
AfterDeath
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Question What to do to switch to Linux?


I have heard lots of good things about linux and wanted to start using it. im getting a new laptop soon and it comes with windows vista. i want to keep vista on but i also want linux (so i think i need something called a multi-booter). I looked up stuff about linux and there are like tons of types of linux so i dont know which to get. i heard that ubuntu is good and something called wine.

Can somebody tell me where to download the best linux and then what to do after that. And i have been using windows my whole life so i want something that might be able to run win programs

(if u have seen this post beefore , i posted this on another forum)
 
Old 07-22-2007, 06:17 AM   #2
uselpa
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Ubuntu is indeed a good start for Windows converts. I haven't installed it alongside Windows but it's known to work.

Its homepage is here, there you'll find the download pages and a very active user forum where you can ask for help. There's also an Ubuntu forum here on LQ.org which you should consider, and Ubuntu CDs can also be downloaded here.

Also, get the habit to use Google - "Ubuntu Linux dual boot" yields some interesting results.
 
Old 07-22-2007, 08:10 AM   #3
mhg
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I am a real NOOB, but my advice would be to dual-boot. With a little work setting up partitions, it is fairly easy installing a Linux distro.

I like Ubuntu and LinuxMint.

None of the distros I have used have been as easy to set up and get running as XP, but I would still encourage you to give it a try. LinuxMint as been a lot of fun for me.
 
Old 07-22-2007, 08:26 AM   #4
IndyGunFreak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhg
I am a real NOOB, but my advice would be to dual-boot. With a little work setting up partitions, it is fairly easy installing a Linux distro.

I like Ubuntu and LinuxMint.

None of the distros I have used have been as easy to set up and get running as XP, but I would still encourage you to give it a try. LinuxMint as been a lot of fun for me.
Also, if you have problems with Ubuntu, I believe with the default install, Xchat is installed, use it to log on to the Freenode Server, and join #ubuntu. Thats a very active IRC channel, which regularly has 1000-1400 people in there helping and asking questions. I've learned a ton just by reading and watching.

LinuxMint is OK, I just hate its GUI. If it used a more traditional Gnome interface, it would be fine for me. That said however, it works, and works just as well as Ubuntu, if you go that direction.


IGF

Last edited by IndyGunFreak; 07-22-2007 at 08:27 AM.
 
Old 07-22-2007, 08:28 AM   #5
pixellany
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The "getting started" link below might help.
 
Old 07-22-2007, 10:05 PM   #6
mhg
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IndyGunFreak,

Can you answer a newbie question for me? I am so new to the Linux DE, I do not know what a traditional Gnome DE is. Would the Ubuntu DE be considered a traditional Gnome?

I have played around with my LinuxMint, and have the DE looking, as far as I can tell, just like my Ubuntu, which makes me very happy. For me the Ubuntu DE was love, or at least infatuation, at first sight, so I am thrilled to get LM to look the same.

Thanks for any help.
 
Old 07-22-2007, 10:11 PM   #7
AceofSpades19
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wine is an emulator to run windows programs. you can install it in ubuntu through the Synaptic Package Manager
 
Old 07-23-2007, 02:56 AM   #8
IndyGunFreak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhg
IndyGunFreak,

Can you answer a newbie question for me? I am so new to the Linux DE, I do not know what a traditional Gnome DE is. Would the Ubuntu DE be considered a traditional Gnome?

I have played around with my LinuxMint, and have the DE looking, as far as I can tell, just like my Ubuntu, which makes me very happy. For me the Ubuntu DE was love, or at least infatuation, at first sight, so I am thrilled to get LM to look the same.

Thanks for any help.
Its MOSTLY Mint's menu system I don't like. The Single Menu, with a bunch of sub-menus, does not appeal to me. I prefer Gnome's default 3 separate menus(Applications, Places, System). One could argue the differences are subtle, and they are, I just don't like Mint's GUI. Now I'm sure it could be tweaked to look exactly like Ubuntu's *normal* Gnome interface, I just never went to the hassle of try doing it.

If you like Mint, by all means, use it, its a solid distro if you ask me. Just as an example of what I'm talking about, see the links below..... As I said though, the differences in the two's Gnome interfaces is purely cosmetic...

http://shots.osdir.com/slideshows/sl...se=790&slide=4

http://shots.osdir.com/slideshows/sl...se=827&slide=5

Happy Trails...

IGF
 
Old 07-23-2007, 03:18 AM   #9
creativename
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The two hardest parts about making the switch for me was before I even installed GNU/Linux. You'll need to learn to burn a CD from an ISO image (unless you get the CD from elseware), configure the BIOS to boot from the CD, and if you wish to dual-boot, you shall need to learn to partition your hard-drive.

If all of that is stuff you've done before, well, no need to worry. Otherwise relax, it's worth the effort.

You can download the ISO from any GNU/Linux distribution (Ubuntu is a good choice), and a good program to burn ISOs for MS-Windows is ISO Recorder v2, and it works under Vista. Do not try to simply copy the ISO onto a CD, it will not work. A few other programs can do it as well, but none of them are as pain-free as the link I provided.

You will need to configure your BIOS to boot from a CD. There is about a 50% chance your BIOS will already be set up to do this. Otherwise, reboot your computer and look for information telling you how to "Configure" or "Setup" or something similar. On Dell computers you usually press F2. It might take several tries. Once you're in the BIOS setup, it can vary widely by BIOS, but look for something along the lines of "Boot Order". Change it so that the CD comes before the hard-drive, and don't worry, the computer will only try to boot from the CD if there is a bootable CD present.

That knowledge is enough to download a GNU/Linux CD, burn it, and then boot from it to install. However, some additional knowledge is required to partition the drive to dual-boot.

If you go the Ubuntu route, I believe the LiveCD mode (this is where it runs completely from the CD) has GParted installed, which is a good partitioning tool. If you can't find it or use something besides Ubuntu, try downloading the LiveCD from the GParted project, which is built just for using GParted. You can burn this ISO file to CD as described above.

Why do you need partitions? Well, a partition is basically a section of the hard-drive, and you will need a separate one from MS-Windows to use GNU/Linux.

Anyway, use GParted (which is mostly straight-forward, you may want to look up some tutorials on it) to reduce the size of the Vista partition (defragment MS-Windows first) to make space from GNU/Linux. You will then be able to install GNU/Linux into that space. Installing Ubuntu is rather straigh-forward.


You may also want to try out some LiveCDs first, look up Knoppix and SLAX and give them a spin. They're GNU/Linux distributions that are not normally installed to the hard-drive, and can run completely from the CD. They do have limitations though (slow, don't save files or settings, etc.).

Keep in mind that you may face some special challenges with laptops, look up your model on Linux-On-Laptops if it's there, the site contains links to tips for getting GNU/Linux running on various laptops, considering how popular Ubuntu is you will probably be able to find something specifically about Ubuntu.

Good luck, and don't be afraid to ask questions here or elseware. Stick with GNU/Linux and I think you'll come to like it, though there may be obstacles.

EDIT: Forgot to mention Wine. Wine is a GNU/Linux program that will run many MS-Windows programs. It won't run all of them, and not always perfectly, but it has come a long way.

Last edited by creativename; 07-23-2007 at 03:21 AM.
 
Old 07-23-2007, 12:21 PM   #10
mhg
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Thanks for the reply IndyGunFreak.

If you add a panel to the top in LM, then go to "add", you can add the exact same menus as are used with Ubuntu. I was very happy when I discovered that, because I feel the same way as you do, the default LM menu is way too cluttered for my tastes. So you can end up with the same three drop down menus.

Thanks
 
Old 07-23-2007, 05:08 PM   #11
frenchn00b
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madclownX
I have heard lots of good things about linux and wanted to start using it. im getting a new laptop soon and it comes with windows vista. i want to keep vista on but i also want linux (so i think i need something called a multi-booter). I looked up stuff about linux and there are like tons of types of linux so i dont know which to get. i heard that ubuntu is good and something called wine.

Can somebody tell me where to download the best linux and then what to do after that. And i have been using windows my whole life so i want something that might be able to run win programs

(if u have seen this post beefore , i posted this on another forum)

Debian by Far !!
http://www.debian.org/CD/http-ftp/

or if issue bios:http://kmuto.jp/debian/d-i/
http://kmuto.jp/debian/d-i/
 
  


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