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Old 01-24-2014, 11:59 AM   #16
schneidz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erik2282 View Post
... a DLNA server to stream movies or music to your TV...
xbmcbuntu has excellent dlna capabilities in my opinion.
 
Old 01-24-2014, 06:41 PM   #17
Ryanms3030
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I have been reading a lot about port forwarding and socks proxies. I want to be able to route my traffic through my server when I am out of the house at a coffee shop as was given as an example. I would also like to have general access to my server when I am at work or other places through vnc I guess?

The tutorials I have read all seem to make it sound as easy as typing something like this: ssh -D 8080 -C -N username@example.com

But what I can't get my head around is how is my laptop going to find my server at home over the internet? I realize I need to incorporate the public IP of my server or maybe my router? But I don't see any tutorials that mention that. I really like the idea of being able to connect to the server from outside my home for various reasons but I also want to be 100% sure I know what I'm doing because it seems like an improper config can open up my network security to intruders.
 
Old 01-24-2014, 08:05 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryanms3030 View Post
I have been reading a lot about port forwarding and socks proxies. I want to be able to route my traffic through my server when I am out of the house at a coffee shop as was given as an example. I would also like to have general access to my server when I am at work or other places through vnc I guess?

The tutorials I have read all seem to make it sound as easy as typing something like this: ssh -D 8080 -C -N username@example.com

But what I can't get my head around is how is my laptop going to find my server at home over the internet? I realize I need to incorporate the public IP of my server or maybe my router? But I don't see any tutorials that mention that. I really like the idea of being able to connect to the server from outside my home for various reasons but I also want to be 100% sure I know what I'm doing because it seems like an improper config can open up my network security to intruders.
I think I had an epiphany. Since I have ssh configured and working, should i just be able to substitute my public ip address for my local server address and ssh in that way from the outside?

...and forward the port from my router to the server for ssh?

Last edited by Ryanms3030; 01-24-2014 at 08:43 PM.
 
Old 01-24-2014, 10:28 PM   #19
maples
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryanms3030 View Post
I think I had an epiphany. Since I have ssh configured and working, should i just be able to substitute my public ip address for my local server address and ssh in that way from the outside?

...and forward the port from my router to the server for ssh?
Yes. I have a simple SSH setup of my own. The "Hostname" is your EXTERNAL IP address. Then enter the port that you have fowarded to your server in the "Port" box. And that's about it...try connecting your laptop to your neighbor's WiFi and see if it works...
 
Old 01-24-2014, 10:43 PM   #20
Ryanms3030
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Originally Posted by maples View Post
Yes. I have a simple SSH setup of my own. The "Hostname" is your EXTERNAL IP address. Then enter the port that you have fowarded to your server in the "Port" box. And that's about it...try connecting your laptop to your neighbor's WiFi and see if it works...
Thanks. That is what I did and I was able to ssh in from my phone while shopping at Target. Pretty cool. I feel like I have made one more step in figure things out. Now to figure out the socks proxys. thanks for everyone's help
 
Old 01-25-2014, 12:02 AM   #21
schneidz
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dyndns.com has free dynamic address following.
 
Old 01-25-2014, 11:21 AM   #22
haertig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schneidz View Post
dyndns.com has free dynamic address following.
I don't think they're free anymore. Older free accounts (I have one) were grandfathered, but I don't think new accounts are free anymore. I could be wrong though.

Although I keep my dyndns account, I really don't use it much anymore. In order to keep my grandfathered free account, I have to login to their website every month to validate. I don't like that. So I have switched to http://freedns.afraid.org for the most part.

O.P. - What we are talking about here is "Dynamic DNS". I am assuming you may not be familiar with this judging from your previous posts (sorry if I'm being too presumtious). What Dynamic DNS does is gives you a name for your home IP address. So instead of connecting to WWW.XXX.YYY.ZZZ IP address, you connect to myservername.afraid.org or some other name of your choosing. Your IP address from your ISP is probably DHCP, which means it can change over time. With Dynamic DNS you instruct your router, or your computer, to tell your Dynamic DNS provider when it's IP address changes (this is easy to do - it's all automated). Then that Dynamic DNS provider associates the IP address your router/computer told it with the name that you chose for yourself (that name never changes).

There are many free Dynamic DNS providers. My current favorite is mentioned above http://freends.afraid.org There are others.

Most routers have the capability to update Dynamic DNS. The problem is, some routers have hard-coded specific providers as the ones they know how to update. So you must choose from their pre-configured list of available providers. No problem with that, if they included some free ones you can choose from. If you don't like the choices available from your router, you can always do it with any Dynamic DNS provider - you just do the IP address updates from your computer, not from your router. Within your computer, you have the ability to choose and update any provider you want.
 
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