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Old 07-09-2008, 02:10 AM   #1
prakash.akumalla
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Thumbs up What Partitions are required


Hai,

As I am new to linux please tell me how partitions should be done. What is custom layout and all. Please tell in detail about how we should have our partitions.

One more doubt is locate command is not working. How can we make locate command work.

Thanks,
Prakash
 
Old 07-09-2008, 02:46 AM   #2
ronlau9
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Mostly you have 1)swap partition
2) Linux native
3) HOme

To make the partition can be done a lot of ways for instance with gparted
The size of ther partition depends more or less on the use of the system


all the best
 
Old 07-09-2008, 03:24 AM   #3
prakash.akumalla
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Hi,

Actually i don't understand what ext2 and ext3 are. Till now I gave only 2 partitions. They are for swap and all the remaining for / . Is that not enough.

Please tell how to make locate command work. For what type of files we use locate, which and whereis.

Thanks,
Prakash.
 
Old 07-09-2008, 05:56 AM   #4
ronlau9
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Ext2 and ext3 refers to the journal used.Ext3 has a better way of doing so.
If it is possible in the distro you use to make 3 partitions than ./ = fore programs /home fore user data
and what swap is I think you know what that is.


all the bset
 
Old 07-09-2008, 06:08 AM   #5
billymayday
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Technically you could get away with just a / partition, but most distros like to have a swap. People add /home partitions, /var, /usr, you name it. it depends on what you are doing. Note that under / you will always have /home, /usr, etc, the point of making them, separate partitions depends on the partition. A /home partition makes reinstalling easier; a /var partition on a server makes it difficult for a rampant log process to fill the root file system, etc.

Edit - ext3 is basically ext2 with journaling added. ext2 doesn't have journaling

Last edited by billymayday; 07-09-2008 at 06:12 AM.
 
Old 07-09-2008, 02:27 PM   #6
xkero
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You'll probably need to run "updatedb" as root first before locate will work. This is because locate uses an index of your files to search which has to be created at least once. Run "updatedb" again to update its index when files change too or you'll get old results.
 
Old 07-09-2008, 03:28 PM   #7
trickykid
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A good rule of thumb is to have /, /home, /usr, /tmp, /var and /boot on their own partitions.

Reasons for this is so if any of them run out of space, they won't directly impact /. When / fills up, things start to break.

/home - for users and their junk. Users can be notorious on filling up space. Creating it on it's own partition protects users from bringing the system down cause they felt the need to store gigs worth of pictures, media files, etc.

/boot - well, it's nice to have /boot all alone. If everything else gets trashed, starts as a starting point to recover the system.

/var - Logs go here. Get a runaway process that produces gigs worth of logs, this protects / for such reasons.

/tmp - Well, it's temporary but everyone has access to read/write. So think of it as home or some application that goes bonkers, good to know such things won't bring your system down due to stupid programming or stupid users.

/usr - usually this is a place for 3rd party applications. You wouldn't want to be installing your favorite applications not knowingly taking up space that fills up / bringing down your system.

Some will also create a separate /opt partition. Think of it as /usr, many Java applications go here by recommendation, etc.
 
Old 07-09-2008, 10:51 PM   #8
josephfucci323
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harddrive problem

i need to know how to make a partition for linux on my new harddrive it is new so i dont think it has any partitions on it
 
Old 07-09-2008, 11:31 PM   #9
AceofSpades19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by josephfucci323 View Post
i need to know how to make a partition for linux on my new harddrive it is new so i dont think it has any partitions on it
boot up a gparted livecd and make the new partitions
 
Old 07-10-2008, 12:14 AM   #10
onebuck
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Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by josephfucci323 View Post
i need to know how to make a partition for linux on my new harddrive it is new so i dont think it has any partitions on it
You can use your GNU/Linux Distro install cd to boot up and use 'fdisk /dev/Your_device' then create the partition(s) that you need or desire.
 
  


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