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Old 09-26-2012, 02:43 PM   #1
ahmedwaqas92
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What Linux OS is most suitable for HP evo D15C mini tower


Hello,

I am a complete newbie in the Linux world so I need some help in setting up my OS according to the requirements of my relatively old PC. The problem is I have a HP Evo D15C mini tower desktop PC. It has the following specs

(a) 512MB DDR Synch D-RAM PC2100 (266 MHz) Non-ECC (2 x 256).
(b) 2.66 GHz processor with 533 MHz front side bus, 512KB L2 cache
(c) 40GB 5400 RPM SMART III Ultra ATA/100
(d) Intel Extreme Graphics (integrated with Intel 845G chip-set)
(e) 32X Combo CD-RW/DVD-ROM drive

I know this is ancient relative to the age in what we are living as of now but is it possible that I can install any given Linux operating system post 2010 era on this machine ?? I seriously do not know anything about linux expect that it is an operating system and for all my life have used a proprietary based OS offered by Microsoft so please tell me if it is possible and if yes then which Linux based OS is the best match for my System
 
Old 09-26-2012, 02:46 PM   #2
JaseP
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For those light specs, you probably want something like Xubuntu or Lubuntu.
 
Old 09-26-2012, 02:53 PM   #3
ahmedwaqas92
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Do they still have users with Community Support

Quote:
Originally Posted by JaseP View Post
For those light specs, you probably want something like Xubuntu or Lubuntu.
Does Xubuntu and Lubuntu have current users and is the Linux developer community making upgrades for this. I am thinking of switching entirely from Windows based operating system as I am quite tired of constant crashes so is there enough help out there given I am a complete newbie at this ??
 
Old 09-26-2012, 03:16 PM   #4
JaseP
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Yes and Yes.

Actually, since the Ubuntu Unity fiasco, Xubuntu and Lubuntu are getting much more attention...
 
Old 09-26-2012, 03:21 PM   #5
ahmedwaqas92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JaseP View Post
Yes and Yes.

Actually, since the Ubuntu Unity fiasco, Xubuntu and Lubuntu are getting much more attention...
Ok so its decided then, I am going for Xubuntu any piece of advice or checks I should make before attempting a complete install ?? Any piece of info would do.....
 
Old 09-26-2012, 03:32 PM   #6
JaseP
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Run the LiveCD before you install to make sure everything works. Also, I advise using a separate /home partition on install. 19 GB for the / partition, 1GB for swap, and 20 GB for /home ought to be alright... In the future, you'll be better able to do new installs without erasing your user data by not formating the /home partition on the subsequent installs.

Do some reading on partitioning the drive before you install... The ubiquity installer app. uses what is essentially gparted for partitioning. Go with the default ext4 partition type (swap doesn't have a partition type other than "swap").
 
Old 09-26-2012, 04:32 PM   #7
bacon_cabbage
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I also have an old pc with 512mb of ram, I installed puppy linux on it and its flying. the kids only use it foe watching youtube videos on it.
 
Old 10-01-2012, 03:00 PM   #8
ahmedwaqas92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JaseP View Post
Run the LiveCD before you install to make sure everything works. Also, I advise using a separate /home partition on install. 19 GB for the / partition, 1GB for swap, and 20 GB for /home ought to be alright... In the future, you'll be better able to do new installs without erasing your user data by not formating the /home partition on the subsequent installs.

Do some reading on partitioning the drive before you install... The ubiquity installer app. uses what is essentially gparted for partitioning. Go with the default ext4 partition type (swap doesn't have a partition type other than "swap").
Unfortunately I couldn't do the partitioning bit but I've installed XUbuntu successfully after two days of trying. There is no XP now on my PC and I am solely running on XUbuntu. However I have a few questions.

1. After I initially installed Xubuntu, there was a notification right at the begining in the desktop screen that some updates needed to be downloaded so I went on and intiated the install. After the installation the computer restarted and when I went to Application Menu>Setting>Additional drivers it displayed a instruction line saying that no proprietry drivers are in use at this time. Does this mean that the updates, downloaded and installed earlier were the drivers or updates for Xubuntu. I am a bit confused, how do I get drivers on my machiene for Linux based operating system or whether the updates were the drivers themselves. Please help me on this one. What I am used to is that once I install an operating system I have to install the drivers separately. Is it the same for Xubuntu or there is some other method.

2. The other Problem is that since I've not partitioned initially in the install could you tell me the drawbacks for this. I know you have already answered this but I could not understand it due to the technical specs you mentioned in the post. Please could you explain it to me; I would highly appreciate this.

3. After the complete installation, the installation guide instructed me to restart my computer but when I hit the restart button the Opearting System got stuck at a black screen just like a dos prompt or terminal command line. I waited for 20 mins but no movement so I manually unplugged and replugged the System. Computer up untill now has not shown any drawbacks...Could this effect later??

There are my initials queries regarding linux and there are more but once we establish these fundamental issues then I guess I would ask more regarding the other issues I have.

Waiting for your reply
 
Old 10-01-2012, 03:32 PM   #9
TobiSGD
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1. In opposite to Windows most devices are supported by Linux out of the box. Common exception are modern video cards (not in your case, Intel only delivers open source drivers which are installed by default) and some wireless LAN devices. If the additional hardware application doesn't offer you drivers that means that yll your hardware is already supported by the system, quite common with older hardware.
The updates you have installed were bugfixes and security updates. In opposite to Windows the update manager will install updates for all installed applications, not only the base system. You will see updates more often than on Windows because of this, but you also can be surethat you won't miss a critical update in one of the installed applications.

2. The drawbacks of not having a separate /home partition (/home is the folder were the user data is stored) is that you will loose your settings and user data in the case that a re-install of the OS is necessary. This can easily be solved by doing regular backups, as you should do anyways. I don't know of any other drawbacks.

3. If the computer is working I wouldn't worry about that.
 
Old 10-01-2012, 04:37 PM   #10
ahmedwaqas92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
1. In opposite to Windows most devices are supported by Linux out of the box. Common exception are modern video cards (not in your case, Intel only delivers open source drivers which are installed by default) and some wireless LAN devices. If the additional hardware application doesn't offer you drivers that means that yll your hardware is already supported by the system, quite common with older hardware.
The updates you have installed were bugfixes and security updates. In opposite to Windows the update manager will install updates for all installed applications, not only the base system. You will see updates more often than on Windows because of this, but you also can be surethat you won't miss a critical update in one of the installed applications.

2. The drawbacks of not having a separate /home partition (/home is the folder were the user data is stored) is that you will loose your settings and user data in the case that a re-install of the OS is necessary. This can easily be solved by doing regular backups, as you should do anyways. I don't know of any other drawbacks.

3. If the computer is working I wouldn't worry about that.
Thanks for the prompt reply, since you mentioned that in the case of my system a HP Evo D15C all drivers are pre-installed in the system so if I run an audio or video file it should act accordingly right ?? Also you said that Linux without partition would only have a drawback once if I would want to re install the operating system. Isn't Linux prone to crashes and bugs?? the reason I switched from windows to Linux is solely because of the reason that Windows crashed a lot and I lost a lot of my office and college work due to this. How often should I backup my Linux data, I thought Linux didn't crash at all. Plus do I need a antivirus in Linux ?? Please advice asap
 
Old 10-01-2012, 05:39 PM   #11
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ahmedwaqas92 View Post
Thanks for the prompt reply, since you mentioned that in the case of my system a HP Evo D15C all drivers are pre-installed in the system so if I run an audio or video file it should act accordingly right ??
Yes.

Quote:
Isn't Linux prone to crashes and bugs??
No OS (in fact no software at all) is immune to bugs, which may lead to a crash. From my experience Linux is far more stable than Windows, especially that Windows XP.
Quote:
the reason I switched from windows to Linux is solely because of the reason that Windows crashed a lot and I lost a lot of my office and college work due to this.
Sorry I have to say that, but loosing data due to a crash is only partially the fault of the underlying software, the first reason for loosing data is to not have a proper backup.
Quote:
How often should I backup my Linux data
That depends on how often your data changes. If your data changes daily make daily backups. If you can easily redo the changes you have made in a week then maybe one backup a week is sufficient for you.
Quote:
I thought Linux didn't crash at all.
As stated above, any software can crash. It is just that Linux (at least from my experience) crashes far less than Windows (although I rarely have a crash on my Vista solely used for gaming). Also, keep in mind that many crashes are caused by faulty hardware and no OS can prevent that. If your harddisk dies (which can happen suddenly and without warnings) you can be in serious trouble if you don't have a backup and rely on your data.
Quote:
Please advice asap
We are a community of volunteers helping people on this forum in our free time. No one gets paid for this. For this reason demanding special attention is considered being rude on this forum and may even drive people away from answering your questions, so I would recommend to don't do that in future questions.

Last edited by TobiSGD; 10-01-2012 at 05:42 PM.
 
Old 10-02-2012, 02:24 PM   #12
ahmedwaqas92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
Yes.

No OS (in fact no software at all) is immune to bugs, which may lead to a crash. From my experience Linux is far more stable than Windows, especially that Windows XP.
Sorry I have to say that, but loosing data due to a crash is only partially the fault of the underlying software, the first reason for loosing data is to not have a proper backup.
That depends on how often your data changes. If your data changes daily make daily backups. If you can easily redo the changes you have made in a week then maybe one backup a week is sufficient for you.
As stated above, any software can crash. It is just that Linux (at least from my experience) crashes far less than Windows (although I rarely have a crash on my Vista solely used for gaming). Also, keep in mind that many crashes are caused by faulty hardware and no OS can prevent that. If your harddisk dies (which can happen suddenly and without warnings) you can be in serious trouble if you don't have a backup and rely on your data.
We are a community of volunteers helping people on this forum in our free time. No one gets paid for this. For this reason demanding special attention is considered being rude on this forum and may even drive people away from answering your questions, so I would recommend to don't do that in future questions.
Sorry about the "asap" thing, I seriously appologize if I sounded rude.... Now since I am up and running, what is the best place to start learning about linux more ? I heard from one of my friends that installing software in linux is usually done via the terminal provided so is there any pre-reading list availble through which I can move around in the operating system more freely. I am practically just browsing and checking mails with the system uptill now, too sacred something might just get ruined so need help. I would appreciate if you could tell me where to start
 
Old 10-02-2012, 02:29 PM   #13
TobiSGD
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If you use one of the Ubuntu derivates, like Xubuntu, you don't have to use the command-line to install software. You should have the Software Center available or can easily install the Synaptic package manager. Of course it can't hurt to learn how to administer the system from the command-line, I would recommend for Ubuntu:
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/
http://ubuntu-manual.org/
http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/index
 
Old 10-02-2012, 02:44 PM   #14
JaseP
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As TobiSGD said, it's rare to have to resort to the command line to install,... but it's worth learning how to...

Open a terminal and type the following;
sudo apt-get install synaptic

It will prompt you for your password (which won't display anything when you type it).

That will install the synaptic package manager, or inform you that it's already installed.
 
Old 10-13-2012, 01:55 PM   #15
ahmedwaqas92
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Need help with intermediate level administrator tasks

Ok, its almost been two weeks since I have started to use Xubuntu 12.04 (LTS) and its been really fun. I can now install and uninstall programs using the Software Centre, somewhat use the terminal or to be honest, just know that the terminal sits in Application Menu>Assecssories>Terminal Emulator, Use Libre Office suite, Browse internet, Set up dropbox, Skype etc.

Now since I can do a few of these things I want to move on to the good part; to master the administrator role in a linux system and for that the first thing I have set my eyes upon is to make a network between my HP Evo D15C and my notebook which is a Dell Inspiron (N series) with windows 7 runnung on it and specs are

1. Core i5 (3.something)GHz 2nd Generation
2. 8 mb Ram
3. 600 GB hardisk

When earlier I used to run XP on my HP Evo I made a wireless network in these two systems and another desktop which my younger brother still uses (running xp) using a TP Link router WR740 N. The internet I am getting in my house is a shared bandwith connection of 512 kbps through a coxial cable connected to a scientic atlanta (webstar) 100mbps modem. I then rerouted the data cable throught the TP link router and with a wireless TP link usb device my brother catches the internet and my notebook does this automatically.

The local area wireless network I created still is avaible for my brother's PC and my notebook but I've lost local networking capabilites from my desktop to both my brother's PC and my notebook. Somewhere along the internet I read that a person needs to create some Samba server in order to do the things I was previosuly doing in Xp but unfortunately I don't know nothing about this and hence I've turned to Linuxquestions.org for help. Please I would highly appreciate if you could give me a step by step guide or tell me some literature to read so that I can get this up and running.

Further to this I would also like a few pointers regarding some programming I am planning on learning since my college has started programming in C++ and C but the problem is that they program in Windows based environment and I am using Linux. I tried downloading some compilers from the Software Center such as CodeLite but the IDE was very confusing and I am just starting C, C++ so could you tell me some compilers that have a good amount of help with self explanatory notes and a simple IDE for compiling C, C++ code.

Many Thanks for hearing me out
Waiting for Suggestions
 
  


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