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Old 04-23-2006, 11:37 PM   #16
Changeling
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I would first try some live cds just to stick your toes in the water, so to speak, like Knoppix, Kanotix or Mepis. Mepis is good because imo it has an easy installer if you decide you like it and want to install on your hard drive.
I found when I started using Linux my library started to increase with all the O'Reilly books I bought and read, and still reading
I've learned much from Linuxquestions.org and people on the forums here. Just remember to have fun and don't get discouraged.
 
Old 04-23-2006, 11:55 PM   #17
reddazz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rickh
That's confusing, if not untrue. Other distros have adapted apt-get to handle their own package management needs, but APT, on Debian is much more than apt-get. There are many APT tools besides -get.

OTOH, You're right about comapring APT to RPM, the correct comparison is APT to YUM.
How can it be confusing or untrue when in the same paragraph you agree that APT was ported to other distros? Obviously a distro will not port things that are not useful to its packaging system. I do know that apt is not just apt-get since I have used Debian in the past and used apt on Redhat 9 and Fedora Core 1 - 3.

Last edited by reddazz; 04-23-2006 at 11:56 PM.
 
Old 04-24-2006, 03:45 AM   #18
Wim Sturkenboom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m_wielgus
I'm using a ThinkPad 600X Laptop: PentiumIII, 512MB RAM, 10 GB HDD
To check for compatibility issues, the HCL is one of the places to go.

I will not advise on a distro (I would only be able to advise on the ones that I know). It's a matter of trial and error before you find one that suites you. Just pick one and try it.
If you're not happy after a while, install another one.

Only advise that I can give is that it depends on what your needs/expectations are:
lots of apps out of the box, use one of the more full-blown ones (imo those are fedora, ubuntu, and the likes)
else try one of the more basic ones (imo those are debian, slackware and the likes)
Nearly everything can be achieved with any distro, it depends on how much effort you want to put in it.

If you wonder what I'm using:
RH8 (general machine), Ubuntu (desktop) and Slackware (servers, desktop)
 
Old 04-24-2006, 10:42 AM   #19
m_wielgus
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And what are the main differences between Ubuntu, SuSE, Mandriva and Fedora Core?
 
Old 04-24-2006, 10:54 AM   #20
Agrouf
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The package managers, the repositories, the configuration tools, the look, the license, the packages installed and support, just to name a few.
www.distrowatch.com

Last edited by Agrouf; 04-24-2006 at 10:55 AM.
 
Old 04-24-2006, 02:35 PM   #21
kriton12
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Part of learning linux is learning the terminology. When people refer to apt-get, yum, yast, rpm, synaptic etc. it's easy for someone who knows nothing about linux to get confused. All of these terms deal with installing software/programs and how it actually gets accomplished. You can always take the source code and compile it/install it by hand, but people found this tedious so they made things called "packages" which had a tool making it easy to install. These are things known as rpm's and deb's. Each distribution was built by people who liked things to work a different way, this is why we have different packages and different tools to install them.

As for installing these packages, since some programs depended on other programs being present people made tools that would check on these dependencies so that users didn't have to go hunt down the missing packages and install them. Instead websites were created, called repositories, that housed a bunch of already compiled packages and people made graphical tools to search these repositories which download and install everything you need for the application automatically. Think of this like Windows update, except you can get patches and programs for free.

Most differences between distributions have to deal with 3 things.

1. What tools are available to the user to install the operating system, otherwise known as the installer. Somebody liked one way, somebody else liked to do it a different way, this is the nature of linux.

2. Tools available to install software. These are your packages and tools to navigate repositories. Packags are generally "rpm" for redhat and systems made either from redhat or made to work like rehat; and "deb" packages for debian or systems built from/made to work like debian (i.e. ubuntu, mepis, etc.)

3. Look and feel, otherwise known as your Desktop manager. There are many of these available, but the main two are KDE and GNOME. They basically operate the same but some people prefer one look to the other and other prefer one implementation to the other. Both are good but represent different directions on how applications are written (programmed) for them etc.

4. I know I said 3 but this is kind of like a mini one. The default software included with the distribution. Examples are the types of music players, office applications, movie players, etc. don't worry though, you can pretty much get any type of software you want through one of the repositories.

So to answer your question about what the difference is between Ubuntu, suse, etc. They are all linux, they all work similar, but they differ by the 4 points I just made. This is a gross oversimplification of course, but close enough to get the point across. Ubuntu is based off of Debian so it uses debian packages and uses Synaptic-a graphical tool to navigate the repositories and install software. Suse uses the same type of tool, but calls it YAST which works a little differently but still accomplishes the same thing. Think of it like using MicroSoft Word as opposed to using Word Perfect; or Internet Explorer vs. using Firefox. The thing with linux is that everybody likes to do it their own way which provides users with lots of choice.

Your choice: My recommendation is based on how much you want to get your hands dirty. Some distributions do everything for you and others require a little more effort. Why would you want to put in more effort? Well it also gives you a little more control. The reason you may jump to a different distribution is because you don't like the way your current distro does something. I'd take the advice about the live distro's and try some out with different window managers (graphical desktop) so you can identify the look and feel that's right for you. I've heard good things about all, the big players are PCLinuxOS, Suse, Ubuntu, Mandriva, and Fedora just to name a few. Take those for a spin, see what you like and dislike. When you become confident with using one of them and start poking around with the guts of it, you may decide you want a distribution that lets you get your hands a little more dirty (or makes you). Then you may switch to pure debian, gentoo, etc. (but remember, all roads lead to slackware hahahah). Good luck!

Last edited by kriton12; 04-24-2006 at 02:55 PM.
 
Old 04-24-2006, 06:02 PM   #22
robbbert
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Quote:
You cannot compare APT with RPM because thats not comparing similar tools. RPM is similar to DPKG on Debian based distros.
OK, that's a valuable piece of information to me. Thanks.
But don't let us confuse the original poster with his thread... Thanks again, though.
 
Old 05-08-2006, 03:16 AM   #23
m_wielgus
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Sorry for my long absence on this forum, but I've had some really hard & important exams recently, so I've had to put off my Linux migration for a while. So, anyway I'm back now and I've got a few new questions.

Firstly, If the differences are only in the installer, the packages format and the "Look and feel", what makes for example Ubuntu or PCLinuxOS so easy and Slackware or Debian so difficult? Are the differences really so big? And what does exactly mean "getting my hands dirty"?

Then I've read that there's a problem with playing MP3 files on Linux. How true is it?

And the third and probably greatest problem: I've also read that there are some problems with Wi-Fi on Linux. Although I can live without MP3 support, lack of Wi-Fi would be a big problem for me, because it's the way I'm connected to the internet.
 
Old 05-08-2006, 03:35 AM   #24
ehawk
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m_wielgus
Sorry for my long absence on this forum, but I've had some really hard & important exams recently, so I've had to put off my Linux migration for a while. So, anyway I'm back now and I've got a few new questions.

Firstly, If the differences are only in the installer, the packages format and the "Look and feel", what makes for example Ubuntu or PCLinuxOS so easy and Slackware or Debian so difficult? Are the differences really so big? And what does exactly mean "getting my hands dirty"?

Then I've read that there's a problem with playing MP3 files on Linux. How true is it?

And the third and probably greatest problem: I've also read that there are some problems with Wi-Fi on Linux. Although I can live without MP3 support, lack of Wi-Fi would be a big problem for me, because it's the way I'm connected to the internet.
If you were to examine ubuntu, mepis, and (especially) PCLinuxOS, you would also find an "OS center" in which you could graphically configure almost everything without opening a terminal window, then a text editor, and then altering .conf files.

mp3's are not a problem in linux. Some distros include the necessary apps. In others, downloading and installing mp3-capable players is trivial. Wifi can be a problem. Again, user-friendly distros have graphical tools for such configuration. Support is constantly improving. You can do a simple google search to find cards which will be auto-detected/configured.
 
Old 05-09-2006, 06:16 AM   #25
sridgway
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Which Distro?

You want a distro that is compatible with your hardware. You want a distro that will help you run Windows Apps in linux. You want a distro the is not bleeding edge but stable, has a good update cycle and good support from the company and its users, but you don't want it too cute... Get a copy of Xandros Deluxe 3 or when it comes out 4. I kept coming back to it when I was distro surfing because of those reasons!
 
  


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