LinuxQuestions.org
Support LQ: Use code LQ3 and save $3 on Domain Registration
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 11-23-2005, 06:20 AM   #1
gooshto
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: 0
What is the Linux file system called?


Microsoft has FAT and NTFS. What does Linux (or Unix) have?

I hope this isn't a stupid question but I looked all over the net and couldn't find an answer. Unless it's called the FHS File Heirarchy System?

Thanks for any help
 
Old 11-23-2005, 06:28 AM   #2
jtshaw
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2000
Location: Seattle, WA USA
Distribution: Ubuntu @ Home, RHEL @ Work
Posts: 3,892
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 66
There are a bunch of different file systems linux can use.

The most popular are ext2 (Extended File System 2), ext3 (all the features of ext2 with journaling), and reiserfs (another journaling file system with very good performance). Ext3 is probably the default on most systems these days as it provides data stability over ext2 with little to no negatives.

They are by no means the only three though. It also supports JFS (IBM's journaling file system), XFS (the file system fron SGI's Irix OS), and many many more that probably aren't so suitable for using for your actual system disks.

If you log on to your system as root and type mount with no arguements it will print out a list of all mounted file systems and what types they are.

For more information check out The Linux Documentation Project's Filesystem Howto.

Last edited by jtshaw; 11-23-2005 at 06:30 AM.
 
Old 11-23-2005, 06:37 AM   #3
michaelk
Moderator
 
Registered: Aug 2002
Posts: 11,856

Rep: Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738
There are several filesystems but the common ones are ext2, ext3, reiserfs, xfs, jfs. The last four are journaling filesystems.
Now you have something to google on.

Last edited by michaelk; 11-23-2005 at 06:39 AM.
 
Old 11-23-2005, 07:22 AM   #4
gooshto
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Posts: 2

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Hey thanks a lot guys for the quick and informative replies. seems like a comprehensive possibility of file systems! I'm guessing Red Hat 9 would be ext3? I'll try that 'mount' command you mentioned earlier the next time I'm at college.

Thanks again!
 
Old 11-23-2005, 07:37 AM   #5
lugoteehalt
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Location: UK
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 1,215
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 49
Quote:
Originally posted by jtshaw
Ext3 is probably the default on most systems these days as it provides data stability over ext2 with little to no negatives.
Think ext3 very hard to recover deleted files, in comparison with ext2??
 
Old 11-23-2005, 07:43 AM   #6
jtshaw
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2000
Location: Seattle, WA USA
Distribution: Ubuntu @ Home, RHEL @ Work
Posts: 3,892
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 66
Quote:
Originally posted by lugoteehalt
Think ext3 very hard to recover deleted files, in comparison with ext2??
I don't know that it should be, the file storage mechanism hasn't changed at all. But I suppose it is possible they do more cleanup when a file gets unlinked in ext3.
 
Old 11-23-2005, 07:49 AM   #7
reddazz
Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: N. E. England
Distribution: Fedora, CentOS, Debian
Posts: 16,298

Rep: Reputation: 73
Quote:
Ext3 is probably the default on most systems these days as it provides data stability over ext2 with little to no negatives.
Most modern distros seem to default to reiserfs except Redhat and derivatives. In RHEL reiserfs support is not even compiled into the kernel.
 
Old 11-23-2005, 07:14 PM   #8
sundialsvcs
Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: SE Tennessee, USA
Distribution: Gentoo, LFS
Posts: 5,354

Rep: Reputation: 1106Reputation: 1106Reputation: 1106Reputation: 1106Reputation: 1106Reputation: 1106Reputation: 1106Reputation: 1106Reputation: 1106
Just like Windows .. .. Linux supports several different types of filesystems. Support for a filesystem is provided by the kernel, through resident software that is built-in to the kernel or through loadable kernel-modules, or both.

(In Windows, the analog feature is called IFS = Installable File Systems.)

ext3 is probably the most commonly used system. It's based on "ext2" but also has journaling, which allows it to recover very quickly from errors if the system crashes.

ReiserFS is gaining popularity because it stores "thousands of very small files" very efficiently... and in an awful lot of practical situations, that is what we are usually dealing with. It also supports journaling.

CD-ROMs and other external media commonly use other filesystems that may only be found on these types of devices.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
deleting a file called --nostop stefaandk Linux - Newbie 1 07-31-2005 06:32 PM
Why is it called sun JAVA desktop system? sh1ft JDS 35 03-05-2005 02:39 AM
delete a file called -n chris2000g Linux - Newbie 5 12-06-2003 08:18 AM
In which file the syslogd is called? zhu_liheng Linux - Newbie 2 10-01-2003 09:29 PM
When a process locks up the system - what is the created image file called? thatgentleman Linux - General 3 03-22-2002 09:36 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:28 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration