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Old 01-17-2005, 12:27 AM   #1
zameer_india
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what is the difference between real root system and normal root system


Hi All...

I Recently installed RHELAS 3.0 ... with kernel 2.4.21-15.EL...
during installation i selected EVERYTHING option from custome part of installation....
I installed successfully... but during boot up....i got a message like...this redhat taroon update requires 256 MB RAM detected (114 MB).... normal boot up starts up....

1. I would like to know how to detect my RAM size through terminal...?
2. what is the difference between initial root file system and normal root file system..?

any help would be appreciate...

thnx in advance...

zameer ahmed syed.
 
Old 01-17-2005, 12:54 AM   #2
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1. I would like to know how to detect my RAM size through terminal...?

Code:
cat /proc/meminfo | grep MemTotal
 
Old 01-17-2005, 01:01 AM   #3
student04
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The only two root filesystems i can think of are

/
and
/root

The first is the "root" of your entire filesystem, and the second being root's (the super user) home directory.

Last edited by student04; 01-17-2005 at 01:10 AM.
 
Old 01-17-2005, 01:04 AM   #4
zameer_india
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thnx Linux - powered for kind semi reply....

r u sure that MemTotal is for RAM size....?

i found that MemTotal : 117596 kB so far... with this info me guessing that me having 128 MB RAM.... ? if so its nice...means i need one more ram for my system..
thanq vey much... but could u have any idea about my second question... any help would be appreciate...?

thnx in advance..
zameer ahmed syed.
 
Old 01-17-2005, 01:06 AM   #5
student04
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didn't i answer it.....? Or is there something i do not know, because my first intuition was that you were confused about something, but correct me if I'm wrong. What do you mean by initial versus normal? Or is this wherein the confusion lies? Where do or did you read "initial" and "normal"?

Last edited by student04; 01-17-2005 at 01:09 AM.
 
Old 01-17-2005, 01:08 AM   #6
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Quote:
r u sure that MemTotal is for RAM size....?
Yes

I too am confused about your second question. Do you mean the difference between / and /root?
 
Old 01-17-2005, 01:15 AM   #7
zameer_india
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Hi student... thnx for nice reply...
plz understand my question...? when i am trying to bootup ..
i think inital root file system was started .. but because of insufficient RAM size (128 MB more required for mys system configuraion) it goes to Normal boot up (i think normal root file sytem was started but not sure)..that's why i found a message like "normal boot up" was started....? me totally confused here... is there anyhelp ... anyhelp would be appreciated....

thnx in advance..
zameer ahmed syed.
 
Old 01-17-2005, 01:18 AM   #8
student04
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Quote:
Originally posted by zameer_india
Hi student... thnx for nice reply...
plz understand my question...? when i am trying to bootup ..
i think inital root file system was started .. but because of insufficient RAM size (128 MB more required for mys system configuraion) it goes to Normal boot up (i think normal root file sytem was started but not sure)..that's why i found a message like "normal boot up" was started....? me totally confused here... is there anyhelp ... anyhelp would be appreciated....

thnx in advance..
zameer ahmed syed.
Are these options you see on LILO/GRUB? Or after LILO/GRUB that you see somewhere scrolling on the screen?
 
Old 01-17-2005, 01:18 AM   #9
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You mean initial ram disk? It's a very small chunk of memory set aside used to run a program before the kernel is up and running, because the kernel isn't fully functional as it's still booting up, so it loads the small program into your ram while the OS is booting.
 
Old 01-17-2005, 01:20 AM   #10
student04
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ah that could be what it is...

I wouldn't worry about it, personally... but if it really does bother you, give more description as to where and when you see the things happening that you are describing.
 
Old 01-17-2005, 01:23 AM   #11
zameer_india
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thnx linux-powered and student04... u done a gr8 job for me.. me going to study initrd manual.... now i got some idea about it....

thnx once again...
bye...
 
Old 01-17-2005, 01:30 AM   #12
student04
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no problemo
 
Old 10-09-2008, 02:03 AM   #13
Bondbest
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Difference between / and root

Can someone help me with the difference between / and root??
 
Old 10-09-2008, 04:23 AM   #14
chrism01
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Please don't hijack a thread. Start a new one.

However, in this case I'll try to clarify.

1. '/' is the root (sic) of the filesystem. IOW, all dir/file paths start with '/'. There is only one, no matter how many disks you have.
2. '/root' is the home dir of the root (admin) user. Other users home dirs are normally under /home eg /home/user1 etc.

HTH


This is a good tutorial: http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz
 
Old 10-09-2008, 07:37 AM   #15
student04
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bondbest View Post
Can someone help me with the difference between / and root??
I answered this question earlier in this thread. Scroll up to post #3.
 
  


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