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Old 02-04-2009, 12:11 PM   #1
QueenZ
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Question What is the difference between Linux Distributions?


OK, first of all, i'm a programmer so you can get all geeky here, i'll pretty much understand it..

OK, so here is what i know so far..
Linus Torvalds made Linux (kernel). He made it as similar as UNIX etc..

And then people started making different distributions..

First there was slackware (my favorite one), then i don't know maybe red hat and debian etc
..

and then SUSE that was based on Slackware and Ubuntu that is based on Debian etc..

OK.. now I think i know what a distro consits of, here is what i know so far..
Kernel
Window Manager
Desktop Environment
Programs

OK so that's all there is i guess.. but check this out.. Torvalds told that he is using Fedora because it has PowerPC support.. now this is very confusing because isn't that something that kernel does? I mean seriously..

and what do people do to make a better distro? add more apps? better DE? What else can they do?

I haven't made my own linux yet (don't have a PC to do that..) but all i need is to compile kernel, wm, de and add some softs and i have better distro than Ubuntu? That's funny.. it really don't get this thing..

Oh and how does this based on (for example Debian) works anyway?

Last edited by QueenZ; 02-04-2009 at 12:12 PM.
 
Old 02-04-2009, 12:21 PM   #2
pixellany
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I'm not quite sure what your question is....

A computer needs an operating system + a set of applications

An operating system is the kernel + utilities, drivers, etc.

A Linux distribution is a particular combination of a version of the operating system and a version of a set of applications. There are infinite possible combinations.

http://distrowatch.com will either make this all clear---or it will confuse you more.
 
Old 02-04-2009, 12:41 PM   #3
QueenZ
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OK so that's all there is i guess.. but check this out.. Torvalds told that he is using Fedora because it has PowerPC support.. now this is very confusing because isn't that something that kernel does? I mean seriously..

How is that applications?
 
Old 02-04-2009, 12:51 PM   #4
pixellany
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Quote:
Torvalds told that he is using Fedora because it has PowerPC support
Where did you see that?
 
Old 02-04-2009, 12:53 PM   #5
r3sistance
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I think you are confused over exactly what a kernal is and does, A kernal requires drivers to speak to hardware. Different distributions use different sets of drivers thus some are more compactiable with certain hardware then others. The necessary drivers are then compiled into the kernal during the install as required. Should you get hardware that is not supported by the distribution you have to go around, get drivers and compile them into the kernal so it understands the hardware and knows how to communicate to it.

Personally I think the understanding of "Operating System" is a little fuzzy, however the idea that an Operating System needs to supply a real time user interface is not correct. A windows manager is not a necessary part of an operating system. An operating system is the interface between software and hardware, it's job is to simplify the connection between application and hardware.

However when it comes to distributions, it's a very limited to way to look at it that you just need four parts anyways, you need to supply and handle alot of drivers and vertify they are as up to date as possible as well as being correct. You have to check/modify and supply software with it, supplying no applications is not going to be very good, also their are security issues and application selection to consider. Overall it's not a simple or easy job... I am only scracthing the surface I am not going in depths on the considerations here.

Last edited by r3sistance; 02-04-2009 at 12:55 PM.
 
Old 02-04-2009, 01:27 PM   #6
QueenZ
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Originally Posted by pixellany View Post
Where did you see that?
in Fedora wiki page...

Maybe i should make my own distro first..
 
Old 02-04-2009, 01:32 PM   #7
r3sistance
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QueenZ View Post
Maybe i should make my own distro first..
Really don't, you seriously have no idea what goes into it, it's MUCH MUCH more work then you realise.
 
Old 02-04-2009, 01:39 PM   #8
QueenZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by r3sistance View Post
Really don't, you seriously have no idea what goes into it, it's MUCH MUCH more work then you realise.
I think i do how serious it is and i really want to do this.. At last i'll get all my answers when i'm done, don't you think?
 
Old 02-04-2009, 01:48 PM   #9
r3sistance
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Your going to waste ALOT of time, but up to you, from how simpliest you think this is however, it's clear to most you really don't know much work is involved. Look at the distributions around, most if not all are handled by teams of people, some having full time employees handling the distribution. At best a single person is not going to get something very portible or indeed very functional.

For alot of distributions, they rely on contributions by many people doing open source programming at it's core. Not single people going off on their own tangent.

Last edited by r3sistance; 02-04-2009 at 01:50 PM.
 
Old 02-04-2009, 01:53 PM   #10
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I'm actually talking about LFS here..
 
Old 02-04-2009, 01:55 PM   #11
r3sistance
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Well good luck with it then, I take it you have not read it yet tho?
 
Old 02-04-2009, 01:58 PM   #12
QueenZ
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Nope but one of my friends has and he actually made it all the way to the end Well he did say that it took him 1 week or so but he succeded

Do you really think it's that hard?
 
Old 02-04-2009, 02:06 PM   #13
Nylex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QueenZ View Post
OK so that's all there is i guess.. but check this out.. Torvalds told that he is using Fedora because it has PowerPC support.. now this is very confusing because isn't that something that kernel does? I mean seriously..

How is that applications?
Regardless of whether or not Linus Torvalds is using Fedora, the following is (more or less) true:

1. Software has to be compiled for a particular operating system and architecture (e.g. PowerPC, x86, x86-64).

2. Distributions support different architectures by providing software compiled for that architecture. This means not just applications, but the kernel too (I can't be more specific than that, as I don't know all the details I'm afraid).

HTH.
 
Old 02-04-2009, 02:15 PM   #14
r3sistance
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QueenZ View Post
Do you really think it's that hard?
I don't truly consider it to be a distribution because it will generally be limited to very certain hardware (because your only going to compile in the drivers for relevant hardware to what you are using), rather that kind of thing tends to be an implementation, also you said he read it, did he actually make a working implementation and was it really worth while?
 
Old 02-04-2009, 03:11 PM   #15
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QueenZ View Post
in Fedora wiki page...
WHERE in the Fedora wiki???
 
  


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