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Old 05-01-2013, 03:52 PM   #1
Jahenry46
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Question What is the best free version of Linux for a newbie ?


What would be the best version of Linux to download for a Linux newbie? I will load it on an Intel PC. Also what would be a good source of tutorials for someone moving from windows with some Java and SQL programming experience and a general understanding of operating systems and their utilities, but not Linux?
 
Old 05-01-2013, 03:55 PM   #2
ozar
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Hello

Most linux distributions are free to download. Some popular options for new linux users would be Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Mageia, and Fedora. Good luck and do let us now how you get along.
 
Old 05-01-2013, 04:13 PM   #3
TroN-0074
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Hi Jahenry.
The distros that are friendliest the most are #1 Linux Mint -----------> http://linuxmint.com/
and #2 Ubuntu ---------------------> http://www.ubuntu.com/

Now few things to keep in mind.

1) The community here are all volunteers and all will be glad to help if you have questions about downloading and installing these OSs be clear with your questions and dont be afraid.

2) Dont expect these OSs to behave in the same maner as the OS you are currently using. So be prepared for a learning curve and maybe that will required some reading in your part.

3) Dont expect any Linux base OS you install to be exact the same as other Linux base OS out there. Think of them as different Operating System that happens to share similar background. But they are for sure different.

If you keep these criterias in mind I think everything will be fine. If you think you are no ready to commit to a different operating system installation in your computer perhaps you could start with setting up a installation in a VirtualBox.
https://www.virtualbox.org/

Install VirtualBox in your computer then install any Operating system you want in your virtual machine.

Good luck to you.
 
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Old 05-01-2013, 04:17 PM   #4
johnsfine
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Ubuntu is the most recommended and selected choice for newbie Linux.

The large number of newbies that already chose it may be its biggest advantage. If you have any newbie question about Ubuntu, you can just google the keywords of the question and you will find multiple people already asked it and someone answered it (probably here at LQ).
 
Old 05-02-2013, 03:21 AM   #5
kooru
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Hi and welcome to LQ!
In addition to suggestions said, i recommend this link to understand linux: http://www.tldp.org/
 
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Old 05-02-2013, 04:13 AM   #6
Makio9
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I thought all of Linux was free to be honest. It is an open source operating system created by the people for the people. I did know there was other versions of Linux other than Ubuntu as previously mentioned by'Ozar' (and he does have them in good in order in terms of popularity also, with Ubuntu being the most popular), but I didn't realize any had to be paid for. I better read up on the fact since I started blogging on Linux at kindredcone.com so I don't look like a fool. I studied Microsoft, but during my course had Linux as an elective and it was amazing. You can download a version (I assuming it's Ubuntu) and still run your Windows as well. Give this a try if you wish.
 
Old 05-02-2013, 04:15 AM   #7
jitendra.sharma
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CentOS and Ubuntu...... Remain you can choose according to your use....
 
Old 05-02-2013, 07:39 AM   #8
onebuck
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Member Response

Hi,

Welcome to LQ!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jahenry46 View Post
What would be the best version of Linux to download for a Linux newbie? I will load it on an Intel PC.
It really depends on your wish to learn and at what level. Most Gnu/Linux that other members have suggested are hold your hand distributions. Not to say those are bad but to learn a GUI is no different than learning to use a Microsoft OS. Personally I suggest Slackware. Sure this will seem difficult at the start but you can always rely on the LQ Slackware Forum members when you get stuck or have questions. You can download Slackware from LQ's Download Linux link or from Get Slackware Linux. Great Slackware help from Slackware Doc Project.

You can look at my sig for other useful Slackware links.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jahenry46 View Post
Also what would be a good source of tutorials for someone moving from windows with some Java and SQL programming experience and a general understanding of operating systems and their utilities, but not Linux?
Several links;
Quote:
Just a few more links to aid you to gaining some understanding. Sure some may seem difficult for a newbie but you must start somewhere;



Linux Documentation Project
Rute Tutorial & Exposition
Linux Command Guide
Utimate Linux Newbie Guide
LinuxSelfHelp
Bash Beginners Guide
Bash Reference Manual
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Linux Home Networking



The above links and others can be found at '
Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!
One other thing; 'Once you learn Slackware then you have learned Linux'.
Hope this helps.
 
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Old 05-02-2013, 07:55 AM   #9
nonamedotc
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I would also suggest Linux Mint initially for getting a feel of linux. Once you gain a little more experience, you can move to more 'advanced' user distributions like Arch or Slackware. At the same time, if you want to be at the bleeding edge (in terms of technology, not newer versions of s/w), you can give Fedora a try.
 
Old 05-02-2013, 08:45 AM   #10
johnsfine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Makio9 View Post
I thought all of Linux was free to be honest. It is an open source operating system
Open source does not mean free binaries nor free distributions.

Several distributions, such as RHEL, are not free. Modifications to Linux source code made by Red Hat in producing RHEL are still open source. So others can (and do) recompile that source code into equivalent binaries and distribute those binaries for free.

Most distributions are free. Some are not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nonamedotc View Post
I would also suggest Linux Mint initially for getting a feel of linux. Once you gain a little more experience, you can move to more 'advanced' user distributions like Arch or Slackware.
I think that gives a misleading view of beginner vs. advanced distributions.

A beginner distribution, such as Ubuntu is not missing the advanced features. Whatever advanced thing you want to do in Linux is possible in Ubuntu.

The default and documented way to do something in Ubuntu might be ultimately less flexible as a consequence of having been made more beginner friendly. But the expert way to do the same thing is also available. You don't need to switch to an expert distribution in order to switch to doing any specific task in a more difficult to learn way (that in some cases is more flexible or faster than the easy to learn way).

I do such a wide variety of tasks on a computer, that I almost never want the hard to learn method for anything, even if it is a little better than the newbie method. I would likely forget it again anyway before the next time I needed it. I want anything I do rarely to be so obvious that I can do it the first time with no learning.

An 'advanced' distribution tends to be missing newbie features. But a newbie distribution does not tend to be missing advanced features.

An 'advanced' distribution tends to be easier to strip down to essentials (if you wanted to run it on severely limited hardware). A newbie distribution tends to have lots of interdependencies hiding inside, so that it is easier to use but harder to figure out which parts you really depend on. Hard drive space is cheap, so I don't care if I have a few hundred MB of software installed that I shouldn't really need.

If you want to use a harder distribution so you can feel proud that you are smarter than ordinary Linux users, have fun. But don't expect me to copy you. If you want to use a harder distribution to force yourself to learn something, that might be valid. You could learn the exact same thing on a newbie distribution, but you would need to make the choice to skip the easy way each time you want to do something. If you prefer to make that choice once when you dump the easy distribution, so you have no choice later, that may be the best learning method for you (not for me).

Last edited by johnsfine; 05-02-2013 at 09:06 AM.
 
Old 05-02-2013, 10:32 AM   #11
DavidMcCann
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You can learn from any Linux. If particular distros make life hard, like Arch or Gentoo, that doesn't mean you learn more: some people might give up before before learning anything! Linus Torvalds doesn't use the self-styled "advanced distros", saying that he wants to get on with his work, not spend time tinkering.

Don't forget that there's no standard desktop (GUI) in Linux, and what some love, others will hate. My recommendations, for some-one wanting to program rather than just tweeting and watching Youtube, would be
Mint with Mate desktop
PCLinuxOS with KDE desktop
Try the live disk for each and see which you prefer.
 
  


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