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Old 03-23-2012, 07:09 AM   #1
purplepeter
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Wink what is the best and the easiest linux out there?


I've tried to install linux puppy but have failed....
now I don't know what to do can anyone help me with step by step instructions on how to in mount and install puppy with the live disc???
 
Old 03-23-2012, 07:17 AM   #2
snowpine
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Welcome to the forums!

Step 1 is to describe to us exactly the problem. What did you try so far, and what went wrong? Did you know there are step-by-step instructions on the Puppy website?

http://puppylinux.org/main/How%20NOT...ll%20Puppy.htm
 
Old 03-23-2012, 07:40 AM   #3
theKbStockpiler
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I recommend reading a few install guides no mater what the particular distro is.

http://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/...llation_Guide/


and

http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/i..._mandriva.html


I prefer Mageia but their Docs. are not well establish yet. Mageia is based on Mandriva so a Madriva Doc. is good for both O.S's.


My third choice would be Ubuntu. I think sometimes they make things harder by trying to make it too easy though.

Last edited by theKbStockpiler; 03-23-2012 at 07:43 AM.
 
Old 03-23-2012, 11:39 AM   #4
DavidMcCann
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As Snowpine says, read the instructions carefully, have another go, and then tell us exactly what went wrong.

Puppy can be temperamental and is not really recommended for beginners, so you might like to cut your losses and start again. If you picked Puppy because it was small and you have an old computer, try Salix, which will run in 256MB. Get the live CD version, which has the easier installer. If you just picked Puppy because you've heard of it, then Mint is one of the easiest distros.
 
Old 03-23-2012, 12:14 PM   #5
Satyaveer Arya
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Hi,

Welcome to LQ!
Quote:
what is the best and the easiest linux out there?
Nothing is easy until and unless you feel it, you should have the positive mindset also for doing that particular thing.

While there are certainly many versions ("distributions") of Linux to choose from, picking one that is right for you can be straightforward as long as you know your needs and are willing to do some research.

- The balance act: Ubuntu Linux, Red Hat and Fedora Linux, Mandriva Linux, and SuSE Linux offer reliability, flexibility, and user-friendliness. They are the most popular Linux distributions.

- Simple and easy: Lycoris Linux, Xandros Linux and Linspire are good first-time choices.

- For those who are willing to give up convenience to experience the natural, unspoiled simplicity, stability, and security of original Linux distributions: Slackware would be a logical choice.

- Want to try Linux but don’t want to deal with the hassle of installing a new OS? CD-based distributions may be your answer. Knoppix is a popular choice in that category. Ubuntu and many other distributions offer this option as well.

Ubuntu Linux is now perhaps the best-known and most popular distribution of Linux. It is well designed, easy-to-use and has advanced the use of Linux as a desktop operating system more any other distribution.

OpenSuSE Linux is a serious alternative for Windows users, with solid, user-friendly installation and configuration tools. Its popularity is held back a little only by somewhat “un-Linux like” business practices, such as not providing ISO installation images for free download. They do, however, offered free FTP installation but now you can download ISOs for free.

Slackware Linux is a good opportunity to learn about the Linux operating system. It gives you back a long-lost sense of control and empowerment. No longer will you be at the mercy of graphical set-up wizards and mysterious background demons.

If you still don’t know which distribution you want to start with, pick a middle-of-the road distribution such as Red Hat or Mandrake. SuSE appears to be somewhat more popular in Europe. Try one and have fun with it. If you don’t like your first pick, try another one. Once you have a distribution up and running there is generally not a big difference between the common distributions; they share the same kernels and use mostly the same software packages. You can easily add any software packages not included in your original installation.

Last edited by Satyaveer Arya; 03-23-2012 at 12:29 PM.
 
Old 03-23-2012, 12:16 PM   #6
Satyaveer Arya
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Linux Mint is also out there. Linux Mint is actually based on Ubuntu Linux, but simplified for users coming from Windows. The user interface has been tweaked to look and behave more like Windows. Most common applications like the flash pligina as well as video and audio decoders come pre-installed with the base distribution, meaning less things to configure for the beginner user. Linux Mint has a very polished software installer where hundreds of applications can be downloaded and installed in one click. You can also view a screenshot of the application that you are about install so that you can see what the application is about. Furthermore all free Ubuntu applications can also be installed on Linux Mint thanks to another installation utility: the package manager. On the downside there is no possibility to buy paid support and no application store for commercial applications. A great advantage for users that come from the Windows world is that thanks to Wubi you can install Linux Mint alongside Windows: it is like installing a Windows application. Upgrading Linux Mint to the next version is less intuitive than with Ubuntu, a design decision to ensure that the user understand that there is always a risk of problems during upgrades. This is not an issue if you intend to stick with your first Linux installation for a long time, but can be a problem if you want to upgrade your software from time to time. Should you run into troubles the community is great for providing help but is smaller than the one of Ubuntu.
 
Old 03-23-2012, 12:17 PM   #7
suicidaleggroll
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Satyaveer Arya View Post
OpenSuSE Linux is a serious alternative for Windows users, with solid, user-friendly installation and configuration tools. Its popularity is held back a little only by somewhat “un-Linux like” business practices, such as not providing ISO installation images for free download. They do, however, offer free FTP installation.
Uh, what?
http://software.opensuse.org/121/en

Last edited by suicidaleggroll; 03-23-2012 at 12:24 PM.
 
Old 03-23-2012, 12:19 PM   #8
Satyaveer Arya
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If you still want to install Puppy Linux and step-wise is your need, then you can check on this link also:
http://www.ehow.com/how_5063994_inst...ard-drive.html
 
Old 03-23-2012, 12:23 PM   #9
snowpine
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I forgot one thing in my response above:

The "easiest" distribution is the distribution you don't give up on!
Therefore it is important to pick one you like, with a friendly & helpful community, and to patiently work your way through the install process and read the beginner documentation.

If you think Puppy is awesome and fun, then you will spend more time with it, and it will be the "easiest" for you. If you think Ubuntu is awesome and fun, or that Slackware is awesome and fun, and so forth, then you will probably have a good experience with those distros too. The top distros all got to the top by being awesome and fun, each in their own way.

http://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major
 
Old 03-23-2012, 12:28 PM   #10
Satyaveer Arya
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Quote:
OpenSuSE Linux is a serious alternative for Windows users, with solid, user-friendly installation and configuration tools. Its popularity is held back a little only by somewhat “un-Linux like” business practices, such as not providing ISO installation images for free download. They do, however, offer free FTP installation.
Ahhh, I have to make that correct.
 
Old 03-23-2012, 12:32 PM   #11
snowpine
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Satyaveer Arya, if you are going to copy & paste reply, at least copy from an up-to-date site like distrowatch.com. Not the first time I've noticed you doing this!
 
Old 03-23-2012, 12:37 PM   #12
cascade9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Satyaveer Arya View Post
While there are certainly many versions ("distributions") of Linux to choose from, picking one that is right for you can be straightforward as long as you know your needs and are willing to do some research

- The balance act: Ubuntu Linux, Red Hat and Fedora Linux, Mandriva Linux, and SuSE Linux offer reliability, flexibility, and user-friendliness. They are the most popular Linux distributions.

- Simple and easy: Lycoris Linux, Xandros Linux and Linspire are good first-time choices.

- For those who are willing to give up convenience to experience the natural, unspoiled simplicity, stability, and security of original Linux distributions: Slackware would be a logical choice.

- Want to try Linux but don’t want to deal with the hassle of installing a new OS? CD-based distributions may be your answer. Knoppix is a popular choice in that category. Ubuntu and many other distributions offer this option as well.

Ubuntu Linux is now perhaps the best-known and most popular distribution of Linux. It is well designed, easy-to-use and has advanced the use of Linux as a desktop operating system more any other distribution.

OpenSuSE Linux is a serious alternative for Windows users, with solid, user-friendly installation and configuration tools. Its popularity is held back a little only by somewhat “un-Linux like” business practices, such as not providing ISO installation images for free download. They do, however, offer free FTP installation.

Slackware Linux is a good opportunity to learn about the Linux operating system. It gives you back a long-lost sense of control and empowerment. No longer will you be at the mercy of graphical set-up wizards and mysterious background demons.
Congratulations on plagiarism.

Quote:
While there are certainly many versions ("distributions") of Linux to choose from, picking one that is right for you can be straightforward as long as you know your needs and are willing to do some research.

- The balance act: Ubuntu Linux, Red Hat and Fedora Linux, Mandriva Linux, and SuSE Linux offer reliability, flexibility, and user-friendliness. They are the most popular Linux distributions.

- Simple and easy: Lycoris Linux, Xandros Linux and Linspire are good first-time choices.

- For those who are willing to give up convenience to experience the natural, unspoiled simplicity, stability, and security of original Linux distributions: Slackware would be a logical choice.

- Want to try Linux but don’t want to deal with the hassle of installing a new OS? CD-based distributions may be your answer. Knoppix is a popular choice in that category. Ubuntu and many other distributions offer this option as well.
http://linux.about.com/cs/linux101/a/distros.htm

Didnt copy the rest, but the descriptions given are word for word as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Satyaveer Arya View Post
Linux Mint is also out there. Linux Mint is actually based on Ubuntu Linux, but simplified for users coming from Windows. The user interface has been tweaked to look and behave more like Windows. Most common applications like the flash pligina as well as video and audio decoders come pre-installed with the base distribution, meaning less things to configure for the beginner user. Linux Mint has a very polished software installer where hundreds of applications can be downloaded and installed in one click. You can also view a screenshot of the application that you are about install so that you can see what the application is about. Furthermore all free Ubuntu applications can also be installed on Linux Mint thanks to another installation utility: the package manager. On the downside there is no possibility to buy paid support and no application store for commercial applications. A great advantage for users that come from the Windows world is that thanks to Wubi you can install Linux Mint alongside Windows: it is like installing a Windows application. Upgrading Linux Mint to the next version is less intuitive than with Ubuntu, a design decision to ensure that the user understand that there is always a risk of problems during upgrades. This is not an issue if you intend to stick with your first Linux installation for a long time, but can be a problem if you want to upgrade your software from time to time. Should you run into troubles the community is great for providing help but is smaller than the one of Ubuntu.
And again-

Quote:
Linux Mint is actually based on Ubuntu Linux, but simplified for users coming from Windows. The user interface has been tweaked to look and behave more like Windows. Most common applications like the flash pligina as well as video and audio decoders come pre-installed with the base distribution, meaning less things to configure for the beginner user. Linux Mint has a very polished software installer where hundreds of applications can be downloaded and installed in one click. You can also view a screenshot of the application that you are about install so that you can see what the application is about. Furthermore all free Ubuntu applications can also be installed on Linux Mint thanks to another installation utility: the package manager. On the downside there is no possibility to buy paid support and no application store for commercial applications. A great advantage for users that come from the Windows world is that thanks to Wubi you can install Linux Mint alongside Windows: it is like installing a Windows application. Upgrading Linux Mint to the next version is less intuitive than with Ubuntu, a design decision to ensure that the user understand that there is always a risk of problems during upgrades. This is not an issue if you intend to stick with your first Linux installation for a long time, but can be a problem if you want to upgrade your software from time to time. Should you run into troubles the community is great for providing help but is smaller than the one of Ubuntu.
http://windows2linux.tech-no-media.com/

I dont have a problem with people copy and pasting. I dont like it when people do not attribute the words they have taken from somewhere else. If you copy and paste, IMO you should tell people its a copy job, and link to where you copied from.

*edit- and it would be good to actually use current info, not info from 2009 and before.

Also, congratulations on suggsting "Discontinued" distros as 'good first-time choices'. Xandros in particular was widely seen as an awful distro. Lycoris, Xandros and Linspire have all been dead for 4 years+ as well.....

Last edited by cascade9; 03-23-2012 at 12:38 PM.
 
Old 03-23-2012, 01:31 PM   #13
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowpine View Post
Satyaveer Arya, if you are going to copy & paste reply, at least copy from an up-to-date site like distrowatch.com. Not the first time I've noticed you doing this!
That, and posting what others have posted before, or not reading the OP's question/replies.
 
Old 03-23-2012, 02:43 PM   #14
wpeckham
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Puppy alternate

You might try TinyCore or MultiCore (from the same site) as it is very small.
Like DSL you can run it live, or using a FRUGAL install beside an existing OS without significantly changing the original OS.

Avoid Microcore is you are a beginner. It is command-line only. Very tight and neat for an experience SysAdm, but not cool for a beginner.
 
Old 03-23-2012, 02:47 PM   #15
linuxandtsm
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As a newbie, i feel that getting info from forum users is what i want. whether it is copied from somewhere or not.
But i do agree that, if copied then proper credit should be given to original author/website via a link.
But just because it is copied doesn't mean the info is not useful.
 
  


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