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Old 07-28-2011, 09:39 AM   #16
neilemac
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spwnt Didn't wait, have tried to enter advice given "sudo apt-get install w64codecs smplayer" but received this message:

E: Couldn't find package w64codecs
So now ...what???
 
Old 07-28-2011, 09:47 AM   #17
TobiSGD
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If it can't find w64codecs you are most likely running a 32 bit OS, try it with w32codecs.
 
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Old 07-28-2011, 10:14 AM   #18
neilemac
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
If it can't find w64codecs you are most likely running a 32 bit OS, try it with w32codecs.
Thanks TobiSGD, had noticed that 64codecs weren't listed in the synaptic repository but 32codecs were. So I installed the 32 from there. Hopefully they'll work for me. Sadly, I removed all the downloaded (by torrent) videos that wouldn't open so I must download again one of those I had deleted. Have my toes crossed that it'll work the next time I try. Much appreciated LQ mate.
 
Old 07-28-2011, 06:21 PM   #19
spwnt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neilemac View Post
Thank you spwnt.


Does your advice mean I should type "sudo apt-get install w64codecs vlc" instead of typing "smplayer?" I ask because I do not have mplayer installed? Prior to joining this forum, I'd been told by techs who I trust that vlc would handle everything I should need to play my music and videos. Or should I ensure that mplayer is installed before entering your thread quoted above?

BTW, had I realized how quickly and generously other LQ members would respond to my baffled mind, I'd have joined this forum and posed my queries ...years ago. Have been wandering in the dark for far too long. So yes, I thank you ..and all who have given me advice in this thread. Gratefully appreciated.
when you "sudo apt-get install smplayer" it will automatically install mplayer for you. when you try to install something the package manager will automatically resolve all of its dependencies.

and yea it sounds like you're running a 32 bit os so w32codecs would be it.

and yea in general vlc will run basically anything, but there are a few exceptions namely mkv files with ordered chapters... but the only time I've ever seen that is if you're watching super high definition fansubbed anime, so you probably won't even run into that problem. you can use vlc and just have smplayer there for backup in case vlc gives you any trouble. couldn't hurt eh?
 
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Old 07-29-2011, 01:20 AM   #20
sag47
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neilemac, you can check to see if you have a 32 or 64 bit system by typing the following command in your konsole.
Code:
uname -a
You should see something like i686, i386, or x86-64. Where the later is 64-bit and the two former are 32-bit.

Remember that LQ has a wiki.

Quote:
Originally Posted by spwnt View Post
you may need to enable the medibuntu repository in order to install vlc and w32codecs (or w64codecs depending on whether you are running a 32 bit version or a 64 bit version)

http://www.medibuntu.org/repository.php

Code:
sudo wget --output-document=/etc/apt/sources.list.d/medibuntu.list http://www.medibuntu.org/sources.list.d/$(lsb_release -cs).list && sudo apt-get --quiet update && sudo apt-get --yes --quiet --allow-unauthenticated install medibuntu-keyring && sudo apt-get --quiet update
sudo apt-get install app-install-data-medibuntu apport-hooks-medibuntu
sudo apt-get install vlc smplayer w32codecs
it's ctrl shift v to paste into terminal. or you can right click paste.

linux has a bit of a learning curve but its really easy once you get the hang of it.
When you asked how to enter the above commands you enter them in your konsole. 99% of the time when anyone says type any kind of command they're talking about entering it in the terminal (in your case konsole) unless otherwise stated.

You may also wish to read the Ubuntu Pocket Guide.

I realize this being your first time using Linux that the wealth of information can be overwhelming so let me give you some basic advice so you don't accidentally step on toes. I'll quote from a book I wrote for other Linux users at another forum I frequent.

Quote:
It all depends on what you want to do. There are a few things to know when starting out on Linux that is good for the Windows user. I'll try to break them down here in a couple of posts and then give you a few options to choose from. I'll get some basic explanation out of the way so you don't accidentally step on toes in a Linux forum. The Linux community can be very touchy (act like little kids even) so knowing this will help you avoid their wrath. The first is to understand what hacking is (read/skim it if you want). Next is that Linux is the common name but it's actually called GNU/Linux (but I'm lazy and just call it Linux). So you are actually using the GNU operating system that has Linux at its core and here is an explanation as to what that means. There are many different versions of Linux since it was first created in the early 90's. These many different versions are called distro's or distributions and sometimes graphically look different but if you look at the file structure they're all essentially the same.
At any rate I hope you stick with trying to use it because once you get to know it then you'll never want to look back.

SAM
 
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Old 07-29-2011, 08:52 AM   #21
neilemac
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Question Am almost there, methinks

Quote:
Originally Posted by sag47 View Post
neilemac, you can check to see if you have a 32 or 64 bit system by typing the following command in your konsole.
Code:
uname -a
You should see something like i686, i386, or x86-64. Where the later is 64-bit and the two former are 32-bit.
Have entered the code and found the following thread after the name of my pc and IP# showed up: ...generic #37-Ubuntu SMP Fri Jun 11 07:54:58 UTC 2010 i686 GNU/Linux

So, i686 means I have 32bit, yes? However, I notice that the date is last month's; that was disconcerting at first but methinks that is the date my friend G dropped by to fix my box by checking out my hard drive when my pc went awry and refused to boot up. We discovered there were loose elements inside my tower, fixed them and then it booted up.

sag47- Remember that LQ has a wiki.

--Yes, I've checked out the wiki, thanks for reminding me.

sag47 - You may also wish to read the Ubuntu Pocket Guide.


Thanks for your helpful advice, oddly enough, I had borrowed the UPG handbook from my local public library a couple or three weeks ago. Found it most useful but all its info has not quite installed ...in my brain. Shhh.

sag47 - I realize this being your first time using Linux that the wealth of information can be overwhelming

This is not my first time with GNU/Linux; but this is my first session (week) using the Konsole. You've helped a great deal SAM and I'm honoured to be in your company.
And thank you for the quote from your book (linked in your previous comment in this thread).

sag47- At any rate I hope you stick with trying to use it because once you get to know it then you'll never want to look back.


Am already convinced SAM, "keep on walking don't look back."

Since following your advice and finding the string finishing with this: ....i686 GNU/Linux, that means I have 32 bit, yes; and Synaptic tells me that w32codecs are installed. Had followed earlier advice given above and downloaded the medibuntu repository. My question now is, however, will vlc simply find the codecs when I attempt to play a video needing them or will I have to manually install them into the player?

neilemac
 
Old 07-29-2011, 09:39 AM   #22
spwnt
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vlc has internal codecs. they come preinstalled when you install vlc. vlc won't even touch w32codecs. w32codecs is for if you use any other media player (mplayer, totem, etc). if you have vlc smplayer and w32codecs should allow you to play anything.

don't forget to mark the thread as solved if your problem has been solved.
 
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Old 07-29-2011, 11:40 AM   #23
neilemac
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Talking Heartfelt apology 'spwnt' and happy news too

Quote:
Originally Posted by spwnt View Post
when you "sudo apt-get install smplayer" it will automatically install mplayer for you. when you try to install something the package manager will automatically resolve all of its dependencies.

and yea it sounds like you're running a 32 bit os so w32codecs would be it.

and yea in general vlc will run basically anything, but there are a few exceptions namely mkv files with ordered chapters... but the only time I've ever seen that is if you're watching super high definition fansubbed anime, so you probably won't even run into that problem. you can use vlc and just have smplayer there for backup in case vlc gives you any trouble. couldn't hurt eh?
Fantastic response, thank you.
But must beg your pardon for not responding to this note earlier; actually, I hadn't noticed it until moments ago. There must have been a few responses to which I responded only to the last in the thread. However, upon review, I decided to take your advice and am delighted to report that smplayer is now installed. Am about to reboot to ensure all will work when I want to see those videos that have been kept from my view. Many blessing 'spwnt,' am beginning to get the hang of this 'konsole' agenda. Am loving it. Thanks again.
 
  


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