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Old 04-22-2013, 07:25 AM   #1
sysmicuser
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Unhappy what does paths must precede expression means?


Code:
find . -type f -mmin +10 -print -not "crapfiles*" |grep SS
gives me an error

Code:
find: paths must precede expression
Usage: find [-H] [-L] [-P] [path...] [expression]
What the heck is that !!!?

Well this stuff does works without any problem,
Code:
find . -type f -mmin +60 -print |grep SS
So Unix Gurus please tell me what is causing me the grief !!!
 
Old 04-22-2013, 07:35 AM   #2
acid_kewpie
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"crapfiles*" will be globbed by bash before execution. so the command will look somethign like:

find . -type f -mmin +10 -print -not crapfile1 crapfile2 crapfile3 |grep SS

so those file names get taken to be the path. change " to ' there.
 
Old 04-22-2013, 07:44 AM   #3
sysmicuser
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@acid_kewpie

sorry mate still it doesn't work. It still gives the same error. I know if I use grep it would certainly work but I do want to use -not clause only. I believe in innovation rather than repetition.
 
Old 04-22-2013, 07:49 AM   #4
shivaa
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Did you check manual of find (see here)? As per this manual:
Code:
! expr 
True if expr is false. This character will also usually need protection from interpretation by the shell. 

-not expr 
Same as ! expr, but not POSIX compliant.
So either try:
Code:
~$ find . -type f -mmin +10 -print | grep SS
OR
Code:
~$ find . -type f -mmin +10 -not "crapfiles*" | grep SS
 
Old 04-22-2013, 07:56 AM   #5
sysmicuser
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@shiva

The code you gave in "Or" is the exactly I am trying and having issues did I missed something ?
 
Old 04-22-2013, 08:06 AM   #6
linosaurusroot
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"crapfiles*" is not preceded by "-name" as I think you intended. Because of this find is interpreting it as a pathname (to be considered along with ".") and should have come at the beginning of the arguments.
 
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Old 04-22-2013, 08:16 AM   #7
shivaa
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I suppose you're getting error like:
Code:
find: path must procede expression:
The option -not is used to inverting the match, so there should come some expression after -not option like -name, -mtime etc. For example try:
Code:
~$ find . -type f -mmin +10 -not -name "crapfiles*" | grep SS
Which means find file/directories whose name doesn't contain "crapfiles".
 
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Old 04-22-2013, 04:29 PM   #8
sysmicuser
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@shivaa

Thanks you ! I understood now. I gather my mistake was not having "-name" after "-not". AM i right?
 
Old 04-22-2013, 04:33 PM   #9
sysmicuser
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@shivaa

A quick question if I just want to print name of file without its full name any trick there?

say h1/h2/h3/abcd.txt I just want it to print abcd.txt -print is better but it print the whole path
 
Old 04-22-2013, 08:32 PM   #10
chrism01
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AFAIK, 'find' doesn't have a built-in option for that, so pipe the results through basename http://linux.die.net/man/1/basename
 
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Old 04-22-2013, 09:32 PM   #11
sysmicuser
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@chrism01

I could get that by using -printf "%f\n"
 
Old 04-22-2013, 10:04 PM   #12
shivaa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sysmicuser View Post
I could get that by using -printf "%f\n"
As Chris said, basename is the command you need to truncate the file name only from it's absolute path. For example:
Code:
~$ basename /dirA/dirB/file1
file1
For more details, check it's manual page: http://linux.die.net/man/1/basename
 
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Old 04-22-2013, 10:42 PM   #13
sysmicuser
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Angry

@shivaa basename can only work for a single file? i am having here multiple files but more than anything else if find has an inbuilt function why not to harness that?

Guys,

I am very close but still not that close

I have got all what I want except file's full path

I am doing a "cd" to a particular directory and then running a particular "find" command which is as follows:
Code:
find . -path \*/output/* -type f -not -name "A1*" -not -name "A2*" -not -name "A3*" -mmin +60 -print
Here i am getting the desired output but not getting the base directory where I did "cd" is there any quick and easy way to get that? else I am thinking of a for loop.

Please advise.

Last edited by sysmicuser; 04-22-2013 at 10:43 PM. Reason: Update
 
Old 04-22-2013, 10:54 PM   #14
linosaurusroot
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sysmicuser View Post
I have got all what I want except file's full path

I am doing a "cd" to a particular directory and then running a particular "find" command which is as follows:
Code:
find . -path \*/output/* -type f -not -name "A1*" -not -name "A2*" -not -name "A3*" -mmin +60 -print
Here i am getting the desired output but not getting the base directory where I did "cd"


Code:
find  /full/pathname/of/starting/directory  /or/multiple/directories  -path \*/output/* -type f -not -name "A1*" -not -name "A2*" -not -name "A3*" -mmin +60 -print
 
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Old 04-22-2013, 11:20 PM   #15
chrism01
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It appears you're right... I did a quick(!) look through the man page, but missed that
In my defence, its a long page.
Mind you, I can't remember the last time I tried to get that anyway
 
  


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