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-   -   What does Ctrl+Alt+Del do? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/what-does-ctrl-alt-del-do-838632/)

Mr. Alex 10-17-2010 09:24 AM

What does Ctrl+Alt+Del do?
 
Does it restart Xorg? Or it does something else? Question is about Arch.

AlucardZero 10-17-2010 09:42 AM

Cleanly reboots, unless you (or Arch) disabled it. Have you tried it?

honeybadger 10-17-2010 09:42 AM

Hi there,
In a cli mode the combination will reboot the pc. This is determined by the file /etc/inittab.
In a gui enviorment (atleast in ubuntu) the combination will ask you if you want to log off, shut down the pc etc.
Hope this helps.

mirchichamu 10-17-2010 09:52 AM

In ubuntu it will give you a choice to reboot, hibernate, sleep or shot down...after 60 seconds it will shot down.

Mr. Alex 10-17-2010 10:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SilverBack (Post 4130319)
Hi there,
In a cli mode the combination will reboot the pc. This is determined by the file /etc/inittab.

Can I configure this combination via /etc/inittab?

Mr. Alex 10-17-2010 10:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AlucardZero (Post 4130318)
Cleanly reboots, unless you (or Arch) disabled it. Have you tried it?

Yes, and I am not sure what exactly it does. I mean what exactly it reboots.

AlucardZero 10-17-2010 10:46 AM

The computer.

PTrenholme 10-17-2010 10:54 AM

Usually ctrl-alt-del will reboot your system. If you want to reboot your X-server (assuming you're using a version 4 release), you need a "ServerFlags" stanza in your xorg.conf file somewhat like this:
Code:

Section "ServerFlags"
        Option      "AIGLX" "on"
        Option      "Xinerama" "0"
        Option      "DontZap" "off"
        Option      "DontVTSwitch" "off"
EndSection

(Where he relevant setting is in bold.)

That will enable ctrl-alt-backspace (not ctrl-alt-del) as the key combination to force the X-server to reboot.

On most modern distributions, the actions associated with various events are found in the /etc/event.d directory. If Arch follows the newer standard, look for a file /etc/event.d/control-alt-delete for the action invoked by that key combination.

Mr. Alex 10-17-2010 11:50 AM

I don't have section "ServerFlags" in xorg.conf. And "DontZap" is not in that file.

onebuck 10-17-2010 11:59 AM

Hi,

You seem to need to gain some basic understnading along with background. Just a few links to aid you to gaining some understanding;


Linux Documentation Project
Rute Tutorial & Exposition
Linux Command Guide
Ultimate Linux Newbie Guide
LinuxSelfHelp
Getting Started with Linux
Bash Reference Manual
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Linux Home Networking
Virtualiation- Top 10

The above links and others can be found at '
Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!

"Wisdom is only found in truth."-Goethe
:hattip:

Mr. Alex 10-17-2010 12:04 PM

Thanks onebuck, but I already was answered with this post. :)
And my bad, I was actually asking about Ctrl+Alt+Backspace. Sorry. So how do I edit function of this combination? As I have already mentioned, I don't have section "ServerFlags" in xorg.conf. And "DontZap" is not in that file.

Sorry again...

P. S. Does Xorg restarting restart GDM?

PTrenholme 10-18-2010 12:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr. Alex (Post 4130408)
I don't have section "ServerFlags" in xorg.conf. And "DontZap" is not in that file.

So, if you want to be able to reboot your server, add that stanza to your xorg.conf file. See the output of man xorg.conf for a complete description of your various settings and stanza available for you to use if you chose to do so.

And, of course, rebooting the X-server will reboot anything (like GDM) that depends on the server and which is automatically started. By the way, you should have different servers running of your different ttys so you can "play" with your server setting in one session, while maintaining a working session in another tty. That can make experimenting with different settings mush less painful.

The way to do this is to open a terminal session in where you have a working server running, and start a new server on a different tty with a startx -- :n command, where "n" is the server number. (Specifying a different xorg.conf file if you're playing with that. See man startx for details.) When you reboot the server - or logout - you should revert to the tty on which your startx session is running.

Note that, if the "DontVtSwitch" is "off" in the settings stanza, you should be able to switch between your X-server sessions using a "control-alternate-Functionn" key combination.

Note also that startx is a script that invokes the xorg command with many defaults. See man xorg if the complete hairy details interest you.


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