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Old 01-09-2013, 04:43 AM   #1
rubankumars
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What do you think of Fedora and Opensuse?


Fedora is called testbed for RHEL
Is it true?
Is Opensuse testbed for Suse enterprise products?
 
Old 01-09-2013, 06:17 AM   #2
TroN-0074
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I don't think Opensuse is a testbed. I use it everyday as the main OS on my Laptop and it is really good. Their community is not as big as Ubuntu's but they have a good community helping with issues. Their releases are every year
I think Fedora releases are every 6 months

You should try both and see which one you like best.

Good luck to you.
 
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Old 01-09-2013, 06:34 AM   #3
unSpawn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rubankumars View Post
Fedora is called testbed for RHEL
Is it true?
Fedora is the testbed for RHEL, that's true. But being the testbed does not necessarily equal constant b0rkage. That is a flawed POV that even some of the more senior LQ members subscribe to unfortunately.

(Yes, it may have been true for ye aulde versions (Fedora Core and =< 14), it may be true if one runs a pre-release version or Fedora Rawhide (informed decision to run bleeding edge), if one has exotic or b0rkage-prone HW / chipsets / SW that wouldn't agree with Linux anyway or if one deliberately runs things contrary to how it should be run in the first place. Opinions are often based on past experiences running older releases but never got adjusted to reality. If you want a good opinion of what Fedora or any other Linux distribution provides these days don't rely on other peoples opinions but run it yourself.)
 
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Old 01-09-2013, 06:49 AM   #4
jamison20000e
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Thumbs up

I♥both! Fedoras on my kids box ((and in tec schools here) less in installer but ALL works, plus) and SUSE was my second distro over 15 years ago, my first was RH6...

Last edited by jamison20000e; 01-09-2013 at 06:57 AM. Reason: not10, 15@least ?time? flies when having fun!!! ;)
 
Old 01-09-2013, 08:23 AM   #5
rubankumars
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Can they be stable as Debian Stable?
 
Old 01-09-2013, 08:25 AM   #6
TobiSGD
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It would be very unlikely that a distro with a six month release cycle is as stable as Debian stable with about 2 years release cycle. Usually Debian's beta phase is as long as one release cycle of the faster distros.
 
Old 01-09-2013, 08:33 AM   #7
suicidaleggroll
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unSpawn View Post
Fedora is the testbed for RHEL, that's true. But being the testbed does not necessarily equal constant b0rkage. That is a flawed POV that even some of the more senior LQ members subscribe to unfortunately.

(Yes, it may have been true for ye aulde versions (Fedora Core and =< 14)
My experience has been the exact opposite. The older Fedoras were very stable, especially <10. They've been getting increasingly more and more unstable with each release. The versions >14 are practically unusable IMO, they crash very often for no apparent reason and with no warning.

I have four <F10 machines that are never rebooted, they typically have uptimes of 500+ days, and they never throw any errors or give any problems. Meanwhile my F15+ machines have to be restarted at least once a month because of random X crashes, ethernet ports disappearing from the OS, lockups, etc.

I feel Fedora has been getting increasingly aggressive with their pre-test releases and it's thrown the distro into the toilet. I won't use it anymore.

About 18 months ago I switched my primary distro from Fedora to OpenSUSE and couldn't be happier.

Last edited by suicidaleggroll; 01-09-2013 at 08:46 AM.
 
Old 01-09-2013, 08:36 AM   #8
snowpine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rubankumars View Post
Can they be stable as Debian Stable?
Yes, of course! "Stable" is a largely meaningless term that depends on many factors: the user, the hardware, the desktop environment you choose, the applications you use, etc.

If a distribution runs well on your particular hardware and is reliable for your particular needs, then I'd say it is "stable" for you. Do you agree?
 
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Old 01-09-2013, 08:45 AM   #9
LeoPap
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I prefer to use Centos! It is simply amazing!
 
Old 01-09-2013, 09:00 AM   #10
unSpawn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suicidaleggroll View Post
My experience has been the exact opposite. The older Fedoras were very stable, especially <10. They've been getting increasingly more and more unstable with each release. The versions >14 are practically unusable IMO, they crash very often for no apparent reason and with no warning. I have four <F10 machines that are never rebooted, they typically have uptimes of 500+ days, and they never throw any errors or give any problems. Meanwhile my F15+ machines have to be restarted at least once a month because of random X crashes, ethernet ports disappearing from the OS, lockups, etc. I feel Fedora has been getting increasingly aggressive with their pre-test releases and it's thrown the distro into the toilet. I won't use it anymore.
Exactly my point: no details about what you ran and how your ran it exactly, no bug track tickets to back up any effort to get things fixed for a next release, no threads on LQ in listing (and maybe even solving) problems: in short just another opinion based on deprecated releases (deities forfend, who would willingly run F10 and as server...).
 
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Old 01-09-2013, 10:10 AM   #11
suicidaleggroll
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unSpawn View Post
Exactly my point: no details about what you ran and how your ran it exactly, no bug track tickets to back up any effort to get things fixed for a next release, no threads on LQ in listing (and maybe even solving) problems: in short just another opinion based on deprecated releases (deities forfend, who would willingly run F10 and as server...).
How is any of that your original point? You sure are making a lot of assumptions here...what point are you trying to make exactly?

All of the systems I'm referring to do the exact same thing. They use similar hardware, run the same programs in the same way and store the same type of output on the same type of RAID. They are not really "servers" per-se, they're just used for scientific modeling, data analysis, and storage. They are not accessible from the outside world, they just exist on the local network. Fedora was necessary at the beginning because the "stable" "server" distros were way too outdated to run the required software. That is no longer the case, which is why I will not be running Fedora any more.

I'm comparing the RELATIVE stability between the different Fedora versions, exactly the point you originally brought up. I have submitted numerous bug reports, all of which go unanswered and unsolved, so eventually I gave up submitting them since they were a waste of my time and weren't doing anybody any good. And I didn't realize you need to post a thread on LQ in order to research the cause of a problem? I do have access to Google.

Here are the current uptimes for the various systems. This isn't in any way a full test of the stability of each version, but it is quite telling, and correlates pretty well with my own qualitative assessment of each machine's stability.

Fedora 4 - 508 days (powered off to be relocated)
Fedora 4 - 97 days (power outage due to a UPS failure, was the same as the other F4 machine before that power failure)
Fedora 8 - 291 days (don't remember)
Fedora 10 - 104 days (powered off to swap a failed hard drive, was 300+ days before that)
Fedora 12 - 6 days (this machine is usually very stable, but locked up out of the blue about a week ago)
Fedora 14 - 22 days (X crashed)
Fedora 15 - 1 hour (nobody was in the office and it wasn't doing anything, looks like my morning will now be spent figuring out why it decided to reboot itself)
Fedora 16 - 71 days (currently experiencing a multitude of X problems, the user is delaying rebooting it because it's doing some important processing)

CentOS 6.3 - 75 days (powered off to be relocated)
OpenSUSE 11.4 - 153 days (powered off to replace a noisy fan)

It's rare for any of the >F14 machines to go more than 30 days without something breaking (reboot, lock up, X failure, etc). This is not the case with any of the <F14 machines or any of the machines running another OS.

If you choose to believe it's all my fault and that the F14+ is not only as stable as previous releases, but is actually MORE stable, that's your prerogative, but I've seen enough to convince myself without question that Fedora has been going downhill fast since v14 and I will not be running it any longer.

The OP asked for OPINIONS about Fedora, and that's mine.

Last edited by suicidaleggroll; 01-09-2013 at 10:26 AM.
 
Old 01-09-2013, 10:37 AM   #12
theNbomr
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I see the big problem with Fedora being the short product life. If you want a product that will have security updates and a reliable repository for any lengthy period, then Fedora doesn't look very good. On the other hand, it is hard to beat in terms of newness of most components. Depends on your needs. If you're doing software development using externally developed libraries or tools, it is often necessary to use the latest or at least very recently available versions. If you want a server-oriented host, the Redhat conservative philosophy of older, well tested and known reliable versions seems to make sense. An an end-user doing standard network and office tasks probably falls somewhere in the middle and that's where I see Open Suse's position.

Just to toss in another data point on 'stability' (hate how that term gets used), I have had a Fedora Core 2 host running continuously for over 1100 days, until it was taken out of service due to failing hardware.

--- rod

Last edited by theNbomr; 01-09-2013 at 10:38 AM.
 
Old 01-09-2013, 10:50 AM   #13
DavidMcCann
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I started with Fedora 1 when it was the replacement for the free version of Red Hat and abandoned it when Fedora 15 came out with Gnome 3: not on my computer! It has got more experimental over the years. Another problem is the number of updates, which frequently break things and almost turn it into a rolling release; I always used the security plug-in for yum to get security updates only.

I've noticed that to get the best of OpenSUSE, you need to stick to the KDE default. Installing Gnome or Xfce from the DVD can often lead to poor programs or missing bits. For example, the last 2 versions have lacked the Xfce search tool, Catfish: it wasn't even in the repository.

Both of them irritate me with the need to get media codecs from a third party. Fedora doesn't even tell you where to go, although it's OK when you get there. OpenSUSE directs you to a repository with weird ideas on dependencies: over the years, the codecs have been delivered with everything from new wallpaper to unrar!
 
Old 01-09-2013, 10:55 AM   #14
jefro
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I tend to use OpenSuse myself. Seems to be more suited to the hardware I have access to.
 
Old 01-09-2013, 11:15 AM   #15
unSpawn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suicidaleggroll View Post
How is any of that your original point?
Often people will just say "Fedora is crap, move on". Without knowing why the OP won't be able to assess if that would apply to his or her situation as well. For example even in the case of those four systems you mention the question would be if those crashes should be attributed to kernel or user land bugs in official core components, outdated SW versions, mixed repos, homebrewn software, SW compiled for another release or using alpha-quality SW, etc, etc. There's a gazillion reasons things may look OK at first glance.


Quote:
Originally Posted by suicidaleggroll View Post
Fedora was necessary at the beginning because the "stable" "server" distros were way too outdated to run the required software.
Not that it really matters anymore since you've moved but it does make me I wonder what OS or Linux distribution release that software was originally written for and developed on.
 
  


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