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Old 03-16-2010, 03:54 AM   #1
PJvG
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What are the red lines in my terminal?


Hello,

I've cross compiled busybox with buildroot for the mini2440 (configured: arm920t EABI) I compiled it dynamically.
I use Ubuntu 9.10 on my build system.

Doing the "ls -l"-command in the /bin directory I see that busybox is marked red. (This is still on my build system, not on my target system!) The background of the word busybox is marked red. And the word busybox is in default colour instead of yellow, even though all permissions have the executable sign.

I was wondering what this means.
Also whether it's a bad thing?


Also could this mean this is why my mini2440 will not boot correctly after transferring this root file system? (It stops the booting process just after loading the root file system)

Thank you,
PJvG
 
Old 03-16-2010, 04:05 AM   #2
Sayan Acharjee
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Actually there are different color specifications for different kinds of files in linux, it makes them easier to manage. If the file is one of these files:
.tgz
.arj
.taz
.lzh
.zip
.z
.Z
.gz
.bz2
.bz
.tz
.rpm
.cpio

it will be in red color.

Check this file for more info : /etc/DIR_COLORS
 
Old 03-16-2010, 04:25 AM   #3
Maligree
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Quote:
The background of the word busybox is marked red. And the word busybox is in default colour instead of yellow, even though all permissions have the executable sign.
To me that's a setuid.
 
Old 03-16-2010, 04:31 AM   #4
PJvG
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Thank you, but like I said I'm using Ubuntu. Ubuntu has no /etc/DIR_COLORS !

However I have found the data you pointed to by using the "dircolors -p"-command.
Still this tells me nothing about the background color of lines!

(And I just found out I should have said green instead of yellow in my first post. Green is the color of executables. I guess I'm a bit colorblind..)
 
Old 03-16-2010, 04:31 AM   #5
jamescondron
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maligree View Post
To me that's a setuid.
Yes that's correct, I think sayan was talking about list items with red text, without realising OP meant the red backgrounded text.

@OP: If you look at what aliases you have, you'll see that 'ls' is set to use 'dircolors'; its set in my .bashrc, for yours it may be the same or elsewhere
Code:
jc@jcmain:~$ grep -n ls .bashrc
77:# enable color support of ls and also add handy aliases
80:    alias ls='ls --color=auto'
Which means when I'm running ls I'm actually running ls --color-auto. If it bothers you, you can get rid of the alias quite easily.

But yes, the different colours wont cause any issue or error.
 
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Old 03-16-2010, 04:34 AM   #6
Sayan Acharjee
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Oops!! My bad.....
 
Old 03-16-2010, 04:42 AM   #7
PJvG
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Thank you Maligree and jamescondron!

It doesn't bother me, I was just wondering what it is.
 
Old 03-16-2010, 05:21 AM   #8
jamescondron
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As a caveat, the file command is pretty good when it comes to stuff like this to work out why a file is coloured the way it is, though only if you have two or more coloured the same that you may compare
 
Old 03-16-2010, 06:26 AM   #9
PJvG
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Ah I see.
When I do file it says:
Code:
.../bin$ file busybox
busybox: setuid ELF 32-bit LSB executable, ARM, version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked (uses shared libs), stripped
So indeed it's a setuid..
Thank you.
 
  


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