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Old 03-27-2010, 02:44 PM   #1
meandsushil
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what after RHCE certification?


What can i do to prepare for job on linux?how can i prepare what should i read i rhce but still need to read more about qmail postfix and all?how get information about it?
 
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Old 03-27-2010, 03:02 PM   #2
paulsm4
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Uh - install some distros and learn and experiment as much as you can?

Maybe install Xen, VMWare Server or another "hypervisor" and experiment with multiple distros simulateously? Perhaps even experiment with an entire "virtual network"?

Perhaps volunteer at a school, church or charity that might use someone with system administration expertise? You'll get a lot of practice, really strong bullet points for your resume/C.V., good references ... and maybe even some job leads. All at once!

Just a few suggestions

'Hope that helps .. PSM
 
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Old 03-28-2010, 12:03 AM   #3
catkin
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Follow questions on here. If you can't answer, research the topic. That way you will get exposure to real life problems and build your expertise.
 
Old 03-28-2010, 01:39 AM   #4
meandsushil
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I used samba concept for backing up data from windows machines to linux machine , i mean all i did was i created 5 users account for five windows machines and shared one partition like "/common" to all of them , so they login from command prompt with assigned user accounts and and can simply copy their data in /common partition .

Is this method called taking backup of required data?

And what is called back up server? Is it samba? What method is used in industries?
 
Old 03-28-2010, 02:46 AM   #5
paulsm4
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Quote:
Q: What [backup] method is used in industries?
A: Anything/everything you could possibly imagine And then some

Do NOT ... repeat, do NOT ... spend a lot of time learning specific buzzwords to put on your resume.

Instead, learn by "doing".

It's not *what* you know. It's much, much more important to *know how to learn*.

My original suggestions remain:
Quote:
1. Install a few distros. Learn and experiment as much as you can?

2. Install one or more OS's on virtual machines.

3. Volunteer at a school, church or charity where you can use Linux ... or ANY OS.
Catkin's suggestion is great, too:

4. Try answering questions at LQ. Look up the questions you don't know. Look up the *answers* you didn't know. Participate. Learn.

Good luck .. PSM
 
Old 03-28-2010, 04:22 AM   #6
lupusarcanus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulsm4 View Post
A: Anything/everything you could possibly imagine And then some

Do NOT ... repeat, do NOT ... spend a lot of time learning specific buzzwords to put on your resume.

Instead, learn by "doing".

It's not *what* you know. It's much, much more important to *know how to learn*.

My original suggestions remain:


Catkin's suggestion is great, too:

4. Try answering questions at LQ. Look up the questions you don't know. Look up the *answers* you didn't know. Participate. Learn.

Good luck .. PSM
This is what I am doing to learn, and boy I have learned a lot, and still continue to. Good advice PSM, and advice definitely worth following.
 
Old 03-28-2010, 11:33 AM   #7
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meandsushil View Post
I used samba concept for backing up data from windows machines to linux machine , i mean all i did was i created 5 users account for five windows machines and shared one partition like "/common" to all of them , so they login from command prompt with assigned user accounts and and can simply copy their data in /common partition .
You're not actually backing it up, then, just copying it all to one central location. Think about it...what happens when that central location has a problem???
Quote:
Is this method called taking backup of required data?
Maybe, but "required data" is different from place to place. And again, you're not backing it up.
Quote:
And what is called back up server? Is it samba? What method is used in industries?
Hate to say this, but if you've got your RHCE, but don't understand what Samba is, what a backup server is, and the differences between the two, it seems like you missed a good bit.

Paulsm and catkin have given some good advice, and I'd follow it if I was you. Google can answer alot of basic questions like this, and give you depth to the answers, that you may not get here. For example, if you ask how people back things up, you'll get LOTS of different answers...all of them right (for the people using them), and all of them wrong (for each other). Get raw knowledge...learn HOW the backup systems work, and why, and analyze your environment, to see which one best fits.
 
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Old 03-29-2010, 12:44 AM   #8
meandsushil
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One think i tell you all, i have not learned linux concept from good institute , they were more towards getting us a certification,so please do not blame too much, i am beginner, well i can understand i am matured one but your these replies can certainly discourage those guys who are new to linux world.DO understand few are Genius and few are hardworking.some people knows it in a second; some takes it weeks to know it ,and experience can be enhanced by helping someone, here in Mumbai there is no opening for linux Admin, so i cant practice. i am thinking of doing MCSE too.!
i hope you understand all freshers out here.
 
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Old 03-29-2010, 12:51 AM   #9
paulsm4
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Yes you *can*, in all likelihood, "practice". I repeat the same suggestions I made above:
Quote:
1. Install a few distros. Learn and experiment as much as you can?

2. Install one or more OS's on virtual machines.

3. Volunteer at a school, church or charity where you can use Linux ... or ANY OS.
Either *you* have a PC, or you have a *friend*, or *mentor* with a PC ... or you can find an organization to volunteer for who has a PC. Church, school, charity, political group - you name it! Just get out there and *do* it. Trust me: if "certifications" still mean much in Mumbai ... they probably *won't* for very much longer. For precisely the reason you stated above. The ability to adapt - to try new things and, hopefully, succeed: that will *always* be valuable.

IMHO .. PSM
 
Old 03-29-2010, 09:13 AM   #10
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meandsushil View Post
One think i tell you all, i have not learned linux concept from good institute , they were more towards getting us a certification,so please do not blame too much, i am beginner, well i can understand i am matured one but your these replies can certainly discourage those guys who are new to linux world.DO understand few are Genius and few are hardworking.some people knows it in a second; some takes it weeks to know it ,and experience can be enhanced by helping someone, here in Mumbai there is no opening for linux Admin, so i cant practice. i am thinking of doing MCSE too.!
i hope you understand all freshers out here.
A certification without the knowledge behind it is VERY apparent to anyone who is going to hire you. Rather than spending the money on a certification, you'd be better off getting a PC, and spending your time actually DOING the work. Read articles on the Internet, Google for solutions, and figure things out.

Also, we can hardly understand what you're saying. Write clearly, use punctuation, capital letters, etc. That will also go a long way to getting you a job.
 
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Old 03-29-2010, 09:25 AM   #11
b0uncer
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The job you finally get (if you get it) will teach you, don't worry. Either it does, or you are replaced. You can try to learn (by doing it yourself in real life, not just on paper) most common things (for example configuring a given setup, like email), but very probably the job you get differs from what you have learned or expected. The environments are never "from the book", and unless you were the first IT guy they hired, you'll pretty surely see some things from the past that affect your work. Could be that you have learned to do things one way, but things are still done in a different way, and you'll just have to adapt, at least for a start.

Don't expect to find a job that fits your knowledge, or the other way around. If you see a job you're interested in, even if you don't fit the picture perfectly, grab it. The selection is the responsibility of the employer, so you should be able to count on them only hiring you if they believe you can do the work, and thus if you get in, don't be afraid of things you haven't done before. Study, learn, do, fix, remember.
 
Old 03-29-2010, 09:25 AM   #12
nonamenobody
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tb0ne View Post
...write clearly, use punctuation, capital letters, etc. That will also go a long way to getting you a job.
not ALL THE TIME THOUGH ;-)
 
Old 03-30-2010, 12:27 AM   #13
meandsushil
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Thanks bouncer,

i have been practicing on my two machine since last 4 months i have even made lan setup with linux os in vmware, i can configure
-DNS
-DHCP
-SYSLOG SERVER
-MAIL SERVER
ETC ETC,
 
Old 03-30-2010, 07:01 AM   #14
austinium
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meandsushil View Post
Thanks bouncer,

i have been practicing on my two machine since last 4 months i have even made lan setup with linux os in vmware, i can configure
-DNS
-DHCP
-SYSLOG SERVER
-MAIL SERVER
ETC ETC,
hi Sushil,

Spend time on forums like this and try to solve issues related to the servers you've practiced setting up. It'll help you practice on real life issues, (as some of the earlier replies had suggested) you might also be able to help others while learning new things yourself. The certification by itself might get you to an interview, but what only you know will get you through the interview and onto a job.

I am assuming you've setup these servers on RHEL, try them on other distributions. If you've only done IPv4 on BIND, try IPv6. The possibilities are limitless. Write a blog on what you've learned while doing all this, it'll serve two purposes:
a) You can use it as a knowledge base to refer back to in the future
b) it'll help other learning these things.
Along the way it might help get you noticed by prospective employers.

All the best.
 
  


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