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Old 07-09-2009, 08:07 PM   #1
jollibee
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Question What's the difference between i586 vs. x86_64 version of linux software?


Hi,

I'm a newbie.

What's the difference between i586 vs. x86_64 version of linux software?

I have a 64-bit computer and I want to install the right linux software.

Which version should I choose?

Thanks!
Jo

Last edited by jollibee; 07-13-2009 at 03:35 PM.
 
Old 07-09-2009, 08:13 PM   #2
Uncle_Theodore
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i586 will run on Pentium class processors and all subsequent models, including the recent x86_64 Intel and AMD processors.
x86_64 will run only on x86_64 architecture.
 
Old 07-09-2009, 08:15 PM   #3
i92guboj
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i586 refers to classic pentium, the one that came after 486dx. Any x86 cpu that is equal or superior to the original pentium can run i586 code. So, it's certainly possible to run code compiled for 586 on your cpu. The pentium was a 32 bits processor, so the software compiled for 586 runs in 32 bits mode.

x86_64 is a superset of x86, which extends the word size to 64 bits. x86_64 cpus can still run x86 code without a problem, but they can run 64 bits code as well.

So, your cpu can run in 64 bits mode or 32 bits mode, whatever suits you.
 
Old 07-09-2009, 09:40 PM   #4
chrism01
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And just to be explicit, if your HW supports 64 bit, you can install a 64 bit OS and it will be able to run both 64 bit & 32 bit apps.
 
Old 07-09-2009, 09:44 PM   #5
Uncle_Theodore
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrism01 View Post
And just to be explicit, if your HW supports 64 bit, you can install a 64 bit OS and it will be able to run both 64 bit & 32 bit apps.
Not quite. If the distro is multilib, then yes, but not every distribution is multilib...
 
Old 07-10-2009, 11:33 AM   #6
jollibee
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Thank you all for the info.
 
Old 07-10-2009, 11:42 AM   #7
jollibee
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I'm setting up Suse Linux Enterprise 10.2. Is that a good OS? What do you think?
 
Old 07-10-2009, 01:07 PM   #8
johnsfine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jollibee View Post
I'm setting up Suse Linux Enterprise 10.2. Is that a good OS?
For what purpose?

Are you setting up Linux as a web server? A database server? A file server? A multi-user system to be used remotely?

Or are you setting up a single user workstation or ordinary home system?

"Enterprise" tends to mean a server of some kind. If you are setting up a home system, selecting any "Enterprise" version of Linux is likely to confuse you.

For a home system, I greatly prefer Mepis. Ubuntu is similar to Mepis and is much more popular and is another good choice for a home system (though I think Mepis is more beginner friendly).

For a server, I have very limited experience using Suse (and no experience installing it). I think Centos is a better choice for a server.

Last edited by johnsfine; 07-10-2009 at 01:10 PM.
 
Old 07-10-2009, 01:15 PM   #9
ronlau9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jollibee View Post
I'm setting up Suse Linux Enterprise 10.2. Is that a good OS? What do you think?
Or do you mean opensuse 10.2 ?
In that case why not here new version opensuse 11.1
 
Old 07-13-2009, 02:58 PM   #10
jollibee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnsfine View Post
For what purpose?

Are you setting up Linux as a web server? A database server? A file server? A multi-user system to be used remotely?

Or are you setting up a single user workstation or ordinary home system?

"Enterprise" tends to mean a server of some kind. If you are setting up a home system, selecting any "Enterprise" version of Linux is likely to confuse you.

For a home system, I greatly prefer Mepis. Ubuntu is similar to Mepis and is much more popular and is another good choice for a home system (though I think Mepis is more beginner friendly).

For a server, I have very limited experience using Suse (and no experience installing it). I think Centos is a better choice for a server.
I am setting up a single user workstation. Suse Linux Enterprise is the generic name of the software.

Thanks!
 
Old 07-13-2009, 02:59 PM   #11
jollibee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ronlau9 View Post
Or do you mean opensuse 10.2 ?
In that case why not here new version opensuse 11.1
Suse Linux Enterprise 10.2 has different download from OpenSuse 10.2. The Enterprise is a supported version and Open Suse is not, I think.
 
Old 07-13-2009, 03:23 PM   #12
ronlau9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jollibee View Post
Suse Linux Enterprise 10.2 has different download from OpenSuse 10.2. The Enterprise is a supported version and Open Suse is not, I think.
It depends what you mean by supported ?
Opensuse is supported with updates EQ BUG fixes for a certain time .
But not by Novell
 
Old 07-13-2009, 05:17 PM   #13
johnsfine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jollibee View Post
I am setting up a single user workstation. Suse Linux Enterprise is the generic name of the software.
I've only used Suse (on a system someone else installed). I never tried to download or install it.

So I have no clue what versions of Suse are available, nor how much of my negative experience with Suse is a result of errors made by the individual who installed it.

So just one partial and anecdotal data point. You asked whether it was a good choice (for a beginner single user workstation) and I gave my opinion that it is not.

For an experienced Linux user, a lot of the differences between distributions don't matter. I'm sure someone who knows Linux just a little better than I do could install a good single user workstation from Centos or any other Enterprise distribution and/or install a good server from Mepis.

But I think a beginner is better off selecting a more targeted distribution. Mepis is very well targeted to typical Linux beginners who tend to have Windows experience and who want to do ordinary home computer things (web browsing, video editing, communicating with a Windows based home network, and many other things). All those things can be done with any other linux distribution as well. But in most cases you need to first learn more about being a Linux system administrator than an ordinary home user wants to learn.
 
Old 07-15-2009, 03:48 PM   #14
jollibee
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by jollibee View Post
Suse Linux Enterprise 10.2 has different download from OpenSuse 10.2. The Enterprise is a supported version and Open Suse is not, I think.
After a frustrating time installing Suse Linux Enterprise 10.2 (fails in the hardware configuration step, the last step), I decided to use Open Suse 10.3. It is now working. Thanks to all of you guys!

Last edited by jollibee; 07-15-2009 at 03:51 PM.
 
  


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