LinuxQuestions.org
Help answer threads with 0 replies.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 06-18-2014, 02:23 PM   #1
Internet_Junkie_1010
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2014
Location: Cyber Space
Distribution: Puppy Linux tahr 6.0.2
Posts: 16

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
What's the best way to putting Linux on a old computer?


Hello I kinda need some help on what would be the best way to put Linux on an old laptop computer. The laptop that I wanted to put Linux on is a "Dell XPS M140 Hard Drive: 150gb OS: Window XP". I was thinking of wiping the hard drive clean and making the laptop only run Linux. In the past I tried running Puppy Linux on a bootable USB, but didn't work out for long. Can someone please give some good Linux distributions that would work great with this laptop? Thank you for the help.
 
Old 06-18-2014, 02:32 PM   #2
NGIB
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2013
Location: Sumter SC, USA
Distribution: My own based on 14.04.03
Posts: 443

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
A new version of MX-14 was released today and one of the developers is the fella that created antiX - which is a king among "old hardware" distros. It's a very nice system and it runs very well on old and new hardware. You can probably set it up for dual boot with XP as long as you have space available on the drive...

http://www.mepiscommunity.org/mx
 
Old 06-18-2014, 02:51 PM   #3
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 12,541
Blog Entries: 23

Rep: Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943
Hi,

Look at this sticky: Newbie alert: 50 Open Source Replacements for Windows XP

Hope this helps.
Have fun!
 
Old 06-18-2014, 03:28 PM   #4
jross
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2014
Distribution: Xubuntu 14.04
Posts: 164

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
You really need to list more than the pc model. Including specs is necessary to get best help.

Also, since you mentioned XP I am assuming you are new to linux? If so, I can say that from my perspective of being new to linux from XP, I think that machine could easily handle Lubuntu 14.04 and if you have 1 gig ram, you could also try Xubuntu 14.04.

I went with Xubuntu 14.04 in April in a dual boot with XP and it has worked out very well for me even though I knew nothing about linux before this.
 
Old 06-18-2014, 07:09 PM   #5
rokytnji
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Location: Waaaaay out West Texas
Distribution: AntiX 15 , Slackel 14.1, ChromeOS
Posts: 4,690
Blog Entries: 19

Rep: Reputation: 1951Reputation: 1951Reputation: 1951Reputation: 1951Reputation: 1951Reputation: 1951Reputation: 1951Reputation: 1951Reputation: 1951Reputation: 1951Reputation: 1951
Dell XPS M140

Looking at the specs. I agree about using MX-14.1

I just installed it on this Compaq CQ-57 with a little beefier specs but the older MX-14 runs just fine
on my Acer Aspire One ZG5 Atom N270 single core cpu , 1 gig of ram, Netbook.

There are install videos at the main site to use for instructions also.

Edit: If I was you. I would go with the non-pae iso version.
The iso fits on a cd also.

Last edited by rokytnji; 06-19-2014 at 12:19 AM.
 
Old 06-18-2014, 11:05 PM   #6
jefro
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Posts: 15,372

Rep: Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198
"What's the best way to putting Linux on a old computer?"

I'd say from a cd. You'd have to make sure you are using good quality media and burn it at the very slowest speed.
 
Old 06-18-2014, 11:31 PM   #7
Internet_Junkie_1010
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2014
Location: Cyber Space
Distribution: Puppy Linux tahr 6.0.2
Posts: 16

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Thank you all for the help that you give me.

No I'm kinda still new to linux. But the laptop that I working is for my mother in law.

Also if you guys need me to give more detail about the computer just let me know.

Last edited by Internet_Junkie_1010; 06-18-2014 at 11:37 PM.
 
Old 06-19-2014, 12:42 AM   #8
l33y
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2014
Location: Gulf Coast, USA
Distribution: Xubuntu
Posts: 50
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Lubuntu 14.04 is my recommendation. I removed the XP partition completely using the parted program from a SystemrescueCD. Then just did a fresh install of Lubuntu, on two of my computers. One was an old Compaq laptop from 2006, with 512MB of RAM.

Last edited by l33y; 06-19-2014 at 12:49 AM.
 
Old 06-19-2014, 05:41 AM   #9
jross
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2014
Distribution: Xubuntu 14.04
Posts: 164

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by l33y View Post
Lubuntu 14.04 is my recommendation. I removed the XP partition completely using the parted program from a SystemrescueCD. Then just did a fresh install of Lubuntu
I'm curious why you would do that? The Lubuntu installer could have done that for you.
 
Old 06-19-2014, 05:52 AM   #10
jross
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2014
Distribution: Xubuntu 14.04
Posts: 164

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by Internet_Junkie_1010 View Post
Thank you all for the help that you give me.

No I'm kinda still new to linux. But the laptop that I working is for my mother in law.

Also if you guys need me to give more detail about the computer just let me know.
I'm assuming mother-in-law is a windows user? If so, I would even more strongly suggest Lubuntu since it has the desktop "look" of windows. I believe it also, when you mouse over an application in the menu, provides a tooltip which explains what it is which might be easier for someone not familiar with linux program names. Plus just being a 'buntu, it is going to be newbie friendly and have lots of support help.

It's always good to include the computers cpu and RAM info.
 
Old 06-19-2014, 08:13 AM   #11
l33y
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2014
Location: Gulf Coast, USA
Distribution: Xubuntu
Posts: 50
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
I'm curious why you would do that? The Lubuntu installer could have done that for you.
After I removed the partition using parted, I issued the following command:
Quote:
dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda bs=512 count=63
The purpose was to make sure the hard drive was completely clean prior to install. My old Dell desktop had intermittent booting errors with Windows XP. It has been error free since I put Lubuntu on it. Not sure if the dd command helped it or not.
 
Old 06-19-2014, 05:01 PM   #12
selfprogrammed
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2010
Location: Minnesota, USA
Distribution: Slackware 13.37
Posts: 290

Rep: Reputation: 55
This machine is a dual boot HP Pavilion XP, with Slackware 13.37 Linux 2.6. Linux has a 23G partition.

First: Only half listen to people who go on about their newer hardware, or newer Linux. The newer Linux have upgrades for new motherboards and new ideas for automatic stuff that takes more CPU or more memory than you will have. Most of anything you need for an older computer is there in any Linux release of the last 6 years. I would not go back farther than Linux 2.6 because of the better hardware handling of udev that was introduced.

However, I ran Linux 2.4 for years beyond its prime simply because it works solid, and KDE in Linux 2.6 is a real PAIN (use xfce4 instead, unless you really really want a Windows clone). Started my long delayed switch of EVERYTHING to Linux 2.6 about 3 weeks ago, and that will take months due to so much recompiling for Gcc 4.6 and newer libraries. I really hate what they did to my favorite editor, and other pains.

I also have Linux 2.4 and Linux 2.6 running on a Win98 three boot system. No problems with small memory or small disk space.
It only has an 4GB drive and a 3GB drive.

I use LILO for the dual boot because it is simple enough to setup and I know it already. I have a menu with XP boot on top, and 6 versions of Linux following it (one huge kernel, and a bunch of custom compiles of the kernel).

I like to make one XP partition, a Linux partition, a Linux swap partition, and a few more spare partitions. Some spares are FAT32 and some at ext2, and they get used for storage, data transfer, and burning CDs. They can easily be reconfigured without any damage to the XP or Linux root partitions. Linux has no difficulty mounting the extra partitions, so there is little need for really large single partitions. My XP system has 10 paritions on a 80GB drive, and my main box has 14 partitions on a 160GB drive (2 of 64GB for a full Linux in each).
You can probably get by with 4 partitions: XP, Linux root, Linux SWAP, and spare.

If you go for the total wipe of XP, then 3 partitions: Linux root, Linux SWAP, and spare.
The spare is really handy for upgrades. The new Linux can be installed in the spare partition without disturbing the working Linux. There are many ways to reconfigure after that.



XP will be useable for a long time. It just will not get any more bug fixes. So use Firefox and AVG, and do not use IE.
It still can do a few things that I find difficult on Linux, like full funtionality in my email (outlook based animations and sound that this other user likes). But that is all I use XP for anymore, everything else is done Linux.
I keep the win98 system for regression testing and it has a good flight simulator on it.
 
Old 06-19-2014, 10:07 PM   #13
jefro
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Posts: 15,372

Rep: Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198Reputation: 2198
Do we have two threads going on here?

First of all you or she picks a distro that they like based on looks, easy of use, and maybe more important to you is that it fully supports this computer. We need to know cpu, amount of ram at least. Maybe even graphic adapter.

Then you usually boot to a cd or dvd and follow the installer. You usually don't have to do anything more. Almost all installers know that you want to delete something and install linux.

If there is important data on this computer you need to get it off and test it before you begin.

Last edited by jefro; 06-19-2014 at 10:09 PM.
 
Old 07-20-2014, 05:54 PM   #14
davidtooke
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2014
Location: austin
Distribution: centos
Posts: 3

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
A cd or dvd works fine. You may be able to use a usb drive if you can boot from it. Also try installing a vm device like virtualbox of vmware player and then install from iso file from your pc.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Putting a computer directly in the path of an air conditioner Cultist General 11 08-16-2011 12:47 PM
Putting Linux on a USB Drive To Use on another Computer JosephS Slackware 7 10-20-2008 06:09 PM
Why my computer is putting screen shot all over when fedora 8 starts eneves Linux - Newbie 1 05-15-2008 09:57 AM
Putting together a new computer... Bombadillow Linux - Newbie 10 01-24-2005 05:13 AM
Putting my computer to sleep computergirl Linux - Hardware 26 09-28-2003 10:07 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:30 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration