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Old 03-20-2016, 10:23 PM   #16
Drakeo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggieToo9 View Post
That's great! I'm so glad to hear it. I've never been so happy to be wrong. Could you please recommend a tilt/wheel mouse with back button and a keyboard that can be programmed to assign functions to keys/buttons (used to full capability) with Ubuntu? That's all I need, just ONE of each device type.

Thank you so much,
Maggie
Maggie the mice thing is pretty simple stuff if you learn linux. And do not think windows drivers.
The mouse is a very low level driver that is easily edited in the xorg.config.
You would be amazed. I have a spacenav 3d mouse I use all the time. and the opensource driver works much better then the blob
the company puts out. you just add the udev/rules for it.
The mouse thing has been around since the 60's it is pretty much the same cursor. I have a nice logetech
gaming mouse that does page back and forward etc etc. all my buttons work fine out of the box in Slackware.
It is amazing the what mouse config can do and then use the kde desktop setting to do fine tuning.

The earliest known publication of the term mouse as a computer pointing device is in Bill English's 1965 publication "Computer-Aided Display Control

Last edited by Drakeo; 03-20-2016 at 10:25 PM.
 
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Old 03-20-2016, 10:53 PM   #17
KGIII
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I'd add to all of the above that it really varies and depends a lot on the age and vendor. I find that things just work but I don't really need a lot. I too rely on the keyboard and that's easy enough to customize.

Don't expect Linux to be and work like Windows - they're not really similar. They're not even all that similar conceptually unless you abstract it away.

I'd start with the basic hardware you want to get, get it, and then test it with a Live USB. Get lots of Live USB disks ready. Go wild at distrowatch and this site has a section to download ISOs as well:
http://iso.linuxquestions.org/

Get something like unetbootin and make a bunch of bootable USB drives. Try all the distros you want on the base hardware. Install the one you like.

Add hardware by giving as much attention as you can to what works and doesn't work. If you don't need tilt (and I've never had it not work) then don't get it.

Scanners, printers, copiers usually work just fine - even the all-in-one work well enough for me. Though you may find that they aren't as slick. I had an AIO that I'd have to import and then do the OCR on it with an application. It didn't do its own OCR properly. I never bothered to figure out why - I just did it locally instead of allowing it to do it on its own.

The big thing is to just let go of Windows. It's tough for some but I've found that those that dual-boot and stuff like that just never switch. Go through all of your network shares and delete all those .exe installers. Get rid of all the programs you've saved and relied on. Jump off the cliff! Really... Just let 'em go and delete them. You really didn't need the last 37 versions of CCleanerSetup(1).exe anyhow.

Your macros might not work but I can't really speculate. My understanding is that a lot of them can be directly used with LibreOffice. Perhaps someone with more experience can speculate?

Keyboards will be able to be customized - if you have back-lighting keyboards that have varied brightness and it is controlled exclusively by software... That's probably not gonna work. Gotta be honest. You can probably find someone who *has* made it work. As you're building a desktop system then you don' thave to worry about the Function Keys working - those should work right out of the box. If not, you can remap keys pretty easily. There's also alias - if you get into the terminal a lot. I save 'em as a custom .bashrc but there are other ways to save it.

All I can really say is that you can try it. If the hardware's really new then some features may not work immediately. The same can be true on any OS. Not even bleeding edge drivers with Windows work and there's not always a whole lot of choices with Apple. The good thing with Linux is that if you find a distro you prefer or want to try, it's easy to switch. You can preserve ~/ and (often) save a whole lot of effort.
 
Old 03-20-2016, 11:50 PM   #18
Doug G
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The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 960M GDDR5 4GB video in my Lenovo Y70 laptop won't let me start fedora 23 unless I disable the switchable graphics mode in the BIOS setup. The bluetooth and wifi in the laptop don't seem to be supported either, I have to use dongles for both.

I have a Canon 8400 scanner that has no linux support.

For the most part linux hardware support is pretty decent though.

Last edited by Doug G; 03-20-2016 at 11:51 PM.
 
Old 03-23-2016, 03:49 PM   #19
MaggieToo9
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Logitech Marathon Mouse M706

Thanks for taking the time to share all the info. I don't understand all of it (HOW to map the keys for instance) since it's all extremely new to me.

I did find that the mouse I have (M705) works well with Linux and does actually have Linux drivers available via a PPA (not sure what that is yet) "Solaar" by Daniel Pavel, which in fact works with ALL Logitech Unified Devices, so I'm good there, now.

I think my laser printer came with some Linux drivers, but I don't know about my Cannon Printer, or my Epson scanner. I hope they do, because I spent a lot of money, time, and multiple tries to choose them. They are some years old now, however, so maybe the drivers will be there. I think it was partially the software I was choosing when I chose these items.

How about hard drives? I have a couple of Passports, a WD Elements, a couple of Toshiba passport-type drives - I'm hoping these are going to work (lotsa expense there). I use them only for storage (no software on them). I'm assuming my thumb drives (especially a 30GB Kingston) are going to work. Do I have to be concerned about drives? I have a WD IDE and a SATA that I've never even installed, yet.

I'm planning on a Lenovo mobo and Intel processor. Any suggestions for other internals for a build? I'm using my same LianLi Aluminum Case, even though no USB3 on the outside. I can buy the top of last year's models of all the parts, if that would be safer with potentially fewer problems. I'm not much of a gamer; I'm looking for quality and stability.

My biggest issue, I suppose is getting the best clarity and color from a good monitor. Any suggestions?
 
Old 03-23-2016, 04:13 PM   #20
James17
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Upon first reading the post at the top of this thread... My thought was your resources were really afraid of Linux or that this was a troll...

Hard drives not working with Linux??? I can not get my head around anyone (with any knowledge of computers) making such a statement... Cause if that were true no one would use Linux... How could they? What else do you suppose one would use?

Last edited by James17; 03-23-2016 at 04:25 PM.
 
Old 03-23-2016, 05:15 PM   #21
KGIII
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Maggie,

It will vary per your distro but all you'll need to do is this:

1) Find a favorite search engine.
2) Find a distro with a large ecosystem (as it is your first time).*
3) Learn some keywords and how to use the engine in #1 well.

*: I am going to recommend Ubuntu family, any one will do. I'd go for Lubuntu personally but Kubuntu is good too. There's an UbuntuMATE but I'm not sure if that's an official flavor. For this, we're going to stick with just an official flavor. Why? The ecosystem is huge and thus there's help readily available.

So, let's say you went with Lubuntu. You'd search for "Lubuntu how to remap keys" (sans quotes, obviously) and then look through the first few listings. In all cases, take a few minutes to make sure you know what the commands do before you use them.

It's imperative to forget Windows if you're going to switch. Linux is not Windows. If you're switching then that means you wanted something other than Windows. Do not approach it like Windows and you'll be fine. It's slow going at first. You're going to break stuff. Do you remember when you were first learning to use Windows? It's going to be a bit like that but it's worth it in the end - I promise you, if you stick it out, you'll be happy with your switch IF you made the switch for the right reasons.

Truth be told, I find Linux to be easier than Windows. I know that sounds odd but I really do. I find it easier. There's nothing I can't do out of the things that I want to do. (I'm sure there's something I couldn't do that I wanted to do but I've not yet come across it.)

Now, your posts read like someone who's just looking for reasons to not take the plunge. Think of it this way. If you don't like it, you can always go back. I personally recommend not dual booting but using Linux exclusively. I don't even recommend using it in a Virtual Machine unless you absolutely have to. If you're going to take the plunge, you've all the tools available except for the internal choice to do it. It can't hurt anything so you might as well try. ;-)
 
Old 03-23-2016, 06:16 PM   #22
Higgsboson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggieToo9 View Post
I did find that the mouse I have (M705) works well with Linux and does actually have Linux drivers available via a PPA (not sure what that is yet) "Solaar" by Daniel Pavel, which in fact works with ALL Logitech Unified Devices, so I'm good there, now.
This site says the M705 is supported by Ubuntu http://www.linux-hardware-guide.com.
It's only when you want to use 'many' logitech wireless devices that the unsupported Solaar program needs to be installed.
For me, if a device needs a PPA for its driver (i.e. the manufacturer doesn't provide the driver, someone else does), then it's not worth it.

Quote:
I think my laser printer came with some Linux drivers, but I don't know about my Cannon Printer, or my Epson scanner. I hope they do, because I spent a lot of money, time, and multiple tries to choose them. They are some years old now, however, so maybe the drivers will be there. I think it was partially the software I was choosing when I chose these items.
When I got my Canon printer, I wasn't even using linux. It came with a CD to install the software on Windows. I don't think the CD will install on linux.
What I did was simply reduce the size of Windows 7 on my hard disk. I then installed several linux OSs onto the same hard disk.
Now I can multi-boot into Windows (which I rarely use) or into a linux OS. But if I want to use my printer installed on Windows, or play video games, I simply boot into Windows. No driver problems!
For security, I pull out the internet cable when I boot into Windows. It's simply a location to use my old peripherals.

Quote:
How about hard drives? I have a couple of Passports, a WD Elements, a couple of Toshiba passport-type drives - I'm hoping these are going to work (lotsa expense there). I use them only for storage (no software on them). I'm assuming my thumb drives (especially a 30GB Kingston) are going to work. Do I have to be concerned about drives? I have a WD IDE and a SATA that I've never even installed, yet.
All hard-drives and SSDs should work fine with linux distros. You can create a linux 'live' USB and see if the OS sees all your hard disks to be sure.

The WD IDE may still be a hard-disk with a SATA connection. If you look at your SATA HDD then it should have the same connection port as the WD IDE. If the IDE indeed has a much larger connection, then it is unlikely to be compatible with a new mobo.

Quote:
I'm planning on a Lenovo mobo and Intel processor. Any suggestions for other internals for a build? I'm using my same LianLi Aluminum Case, even though no USB3 on the outside. I can buy the top of last year's models of all the parts, if that would be safer with potentially fewer problems. I'm not much of a gamer; I'm looking for quality and stability.
Between AMD and Intel, I believe Intel provides greater support for linux. I think Intel even work on developing the linux kernel along with the linux people. So an Intel chip will be a good decision.
Intel Skylake will use new DDR4 RAM and be a bit more future-proof.
You can check the Gigabit LAN of the mobo. Is it Intel or some other manufacturer? If it's another manufacturer, then you can search to see if they provide their drivers to linux.
The mobo will have a sound card (probably realtek). If the soundcard is the latest then it should have full support with the latest linux kernel.
It's usually older hardware which creates difficulties in finding the drivers. Again, you can do a search for compatibility.

Quote:
My biggest issue, I suppose is getting the best clarity and color from a good monitor. Any suggestions?
If you intend to use the Intel integrated GPU, then Iris graphics will give the best displays for pre-Skylake processors. With Skylake, the best one seems to be HD 530https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skylak...top_processors
Both types offer 1080p and 4k display and allow display on more than one TV/monitor.
If you want a separate GPU (which you'll need as a serious gamer or are into video editing etc), then you can search the model under 'linux compatibility' to see if there are any problems.
 
Old 03-23-2016, 07:37 PM   #23
ardvark71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KGIII View Post
Think of it this way. If you don't like it, you can always go back. I personally recommend not dual booting but using Linux exclusively. I don't even recommend using it in a Virtual Machine unless you absolutely have to.
This is what I did back in 2006-7 when I replaced Windows XP with Ubuntu 5.10 and used it exclusively (as my sole OS) for about five months. This was back when Ubuntu (and possibly Linux as a whole) was more "rough around the edges" and required a bit more command line work. Plus, I had to use an external dial-up modem because Ubuntu wouldn't work with my internal PCI winmodem. I think I learned more about Linux in those five months than any time before or since.

Regards...

Last edited by ardvark71; 03-23-2016 at 07:39 PM. Reason: Corrections.
 
Old 03-23-2016, 07:48 PM   #24
ardvark71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggieToo9 View Post
I'm planning on a Lenovo mobo and Intel processor.
I didn't know Lenovo made retail boards. I would like to see the one you're interested in, if you could provide a link.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggieToo9 View Post
Any suggestions for other internals for a build? I'm using my same LianLi Aluminum Case, even though no USB3 on the outside. I can buy the top of last year's models of all the parts, if that would be safer with potentially fewer problems. I'm not much of a gamer; I'm looking for quality and stability.
Just as a thought, choose a high quality motherboard that will allow you to use add-on cards as much as possible and minimize the use of onboard devices. This will give you flexibility in choosing the parts that are best compatible with Linux. This is how I prefer to build my systems (and did with a retrobox that I want to sell.)

Regards...

Last edited by ardvark71; 03-23-2016 at 07:50 PM. Reason: Changed wording.
 
Old 03-23-2016, 09:26 PM   #25
KGIII
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ardvark71 View Post
This is what I did back in 2006-7 when I replaced Windows XP with Ubuntu 5.10 and used it exclusively (as my sole OS) for about five months. This was back when Ubuntu (and possibly Linux as a whole) was more "rough around the edges" and required a bit more command line work.
I understand. I've a history with SunOS/Solaris and then I actually started installing Linux a long time ago - sometime in the 1990s. It was very long ago by most folk's standards.

Notice I said installing it. I'd dual boot, keep it installed on a second hard drive and only boot to it once in a while to update it, to play for a few minutes while bored, or just to try something out. But, I wasn't using it. Not even close. I'd spend, at most, an hour a month. That's been generous as it was surely less than an hour averaged out.

It was usually long enough to try, get frustrated, and then quit. For the longest time I used Mandriva then Mandrake. I played with Debian and Arch. I never got into any of the BSDs until I found GhostBSD - I use that in a VM - a lot.

So, eventually, I said enough is enough. I didn't even start booting to Linux exclusively so much as I left myself no choice. I deleted ever old .exe file on my network's storage. I wiped every *single* OS drive in the house (in a fit of insanity, I guess you could say - except I was sane while I did it). I then ran around trying pretty much every single distro out there that was in the DistroWatch site.

As in nearly all of them. I probably did close to 90% but, I should make it clear, a lot of them where in virtual machines. One of the first things I did was buy a copy of VMWare for Linux - I prefer it over VirtualBox. I gave them all a try and I made it a point to try to give them all at least a little while. I set some criteria and just worked my way down.

This is only valid for me... I have some screaming fast new hardware and I've even kept some of the older stuff kicking around for nostalgia. I found what works best for me is LXDE. I don't really care what the WM is so much but Lubuntu is what works best for me. It is what I prefer. I like the simplicity of LXDE and I can make it look good to me. It's insanely fast on new hardware and beautifully light on older hardware. I could go lighter on the old hardware (and have - I gotta play) but LXDE is just about ideal for me.

But, I tried a whole lot of them. I do mean a lot. I have ample thumb drives. I even found one toy that let me make multi-boot thumb drives. I've figured out persistent storage and how to wrap my OS back up again. I picked Lubuntu for LXDE and access to the Ubuntu ecosystem. It just made sense for my needs.

I think the point of this novella is that I wasn't learning anything with Windows and I wasn't really booting into Linux at all. I was languishing. I'm getting old and my brain is turning plasticine. So, Linux it is and I've been having fun with it. It all comes back to you - at least POSIX does. I can say I've been using Linux for 20 years or so but that'd be a lie. At least I'd think of it as a lie. It's only been about a year now that I've used it exclusively though I did start picking up some usage about 2 years ago but not enough to say I was using it.

Make sense?

Sorry for the novella but some things don't fit easily on a bumper sticker nor in 140 characters.
 
Old 03-23-2016, 10:35 PM   #26
ardvark71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KGIII View Post
Make sense?
Totally. I don't know if it came across but what I was seeking to convey was my agreement with your comment and that if the OP wanted to learn Linux more thoroughly, wiping Windows and using Linux exclusively might be a good way to do it. Kind of like foreign language classes that use the "immersion" method of learning.

In my case, after five months of using Ubuntu 5.10 and dealing with the bugs and difficulties getting software either installed or working right, I had enough and went back to Windows. I felt Linux was simply not mature enough yet. In 2010 or 2011, I gave Ubuntu (and Linux) another look and tried out Kubuntu (I don't remember the version) by dual booting it with my copy of Windows Vista. I don't remember having any negative impressions of it other than, for some reason, when I ran Kubuntu, my DSL connection would go out and I would have to restart the modem at least once every other session, I think. In March of 2012, my copy of Windows Vista started malfunctioning and then just completely went out. The restore DVD's that I had the store burn where I got the laptop from didn't work, so I installed Ubuntu 10.04 64 bit. I was actually impressed with and enjoyed this particular version of Ubuntu and used it as my sole OS from then up until February of last year when the hard drive failed. After replacing it, I installed Lubuntu 14.04 32 bit and it runs beautifully. I run both Windows Vista and Lubuntu on my current desktop system that I acquired last year. Overall, since Ubuntu 10.04, I've been pretty happy with Linux and appreciate the freedom and latitude it gives, especially the licensing aspects, which I don't have with Windows.

Regards...
 
Old 03-23-2016, 11:15 PM   #27
KGIII
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ardvark71 View Post
Totally. I don't know if it came across but what I was seeking to convey was my agreement with your comment and that if the OP wanted to learn Linux more thoroughly, wiping Windows and using Linux exclusively might be a good way to do it. Kind of like foreign language classes that use the "immersion" method of learning.
Yeah, I kind of figured it'd be a similar story - in some regards at least. I do not believe we're unique, I think a lot of us fall into this sort of category. Sorry if it came out the wrong way. I'm very verbose but I somehow miss the articulate boat.

Really, I probably should have been more articulate. I probably should have indicated that my reply was not just meant for you but also meant for the thread starter (or others who read it) so that they can see and understand how it happened. I figure (and I may be mistaken) the more people who see that the transition is really painless (especially today) then the more people will make informed choices about what operating system they use.

Err... Seeing as I'm here, I might as well make a disclosure. I am not an open source zealot or anything - but I'm glad people are. I don't so much wish people would use open source, I wish they would educate themselves and make a decision based on informed consent. (Which obviously means they'd be choosing Linux! )

Sorry, couldn't help myself. I don't mind if people pick a Mac or Windows or even ChromeOS or Linux. What matters to me is that they know the differences, the strength and weaknesses, and then pick the operating system that best enables them to accomplish their goals in a timely and safe manner.

And, to make sure, that too was included/mentioned just in case others read the thread.

Someday, I should do a Linux Success Story for this site but I have to get permission to share it. I have a lovely girlfriend because I just happened to have a Live USB in my laptop bag when I came upon a damsel in distress. But, that's a topic for another day and I've digressed and derailed enough for one thread.
 
Old 03-24-2016, 01:36 AM   #28
ardvark71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KGIII View Post
I'm very verbose but I somehow miss the articulate boat.

Really, I probably should have been more articulate. I probably should have indicated that my reply was not just meant for you but also meant for the thread starter (or others who read it) so that they can see and understand how it happened. I figure (and I may be mistaken) the more people who see that the transition is really painless (especially today) then the more people will make informed choices about what operating system they use.
Not a problem. I think we've all at least once in our lives have been "guilty" of this, not that I feel you did anything wrong in your explanation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KGIII View Post
Err... Seeing as I'm here, I might as well make a disclosure. I am not an open source zealot or anything - but I'm glad people are. I don't so much wish people would use open source, I wish they would educate themselves and make a decision based on informed consent. (Which obviously means they'd be choosing Linux! )
I think I can certainly relate in a sense. I see the benefits (and drawbacks) to both Linux and Windows. I use both regularly. I'm not what one could call a Linux "purist," meaning that I have no objection to using proprietary blobs (or software) in Linux (i.e., Nvidia drivers) if it enhances user experience and functionality.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KGIII View Post
Someday, I should do a Linux Success Story for this site but I have to get permission to share it. I have a lovely girlfriend because I just happened to have a Live USB in my laptop bag when I came upon a damsel in distress.
By all means! That is what your LQ blog space is for. Let me know if and when you write it, I would love to read it.

But yes, do get her permission first!

Regards...

Last edited by ardvark71; 03-24-2016 at 01:38 AM. Reason: Correction.
 
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Old 03-24-2016, 07:06 PM   #29
MaggieToo9
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Thanks

I appreciate all the comments and help. I got the Lenovo laptop with Windows 7 (hate it) just to be sure I can get my bills paid and other essentials done while learning Linux on my new/updated desktop machine. I'm leaning towards 64-bit Linux Mint 17.3 KDE because I want the File Manager and Desktop configuration options. When I try Live CDs, that's the biggest stumbling block for me: the HUGE text and icons, etc, and difficulty navigating because I can't change the File Manager interface to something that is logical to me and comfortable and efficient for me to use.

I may install my retail XP as a dual boot just to access any peripherals that Linux won't use properly (thanks for that great idea). I understand if I do this, I should install XP first, right? I won't be using it for anything except peripheral access. To the internet connection unplugger: I use <cmd: ipconfig /release> to release my IP address whenever I'm not using the internet in XP. That's a little easier for me than disconnecting my router or modem.

Thanks again all,
Anna
 
Old 03-24-2016, 07:09 PM   #30
hydrurga
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggieToo9 View Post
I'm leaning towards 64-bit Linux Mint 17.3 KDE because I want the File Manager and Desktop configuration options.
You won't regret it - it's a wonderful flavour/desktop environment combination.
 
  


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