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Old 09-10-2008, 04:55 PM   #1
Nsis
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Using wine to run games, does it matter how I install theme?


I also have windows vista [dual boot], if I install the game on windows and then run the game from linux using wine, does it change anything from installing the game using wine [on the "fake c drive"]? Or is it just the same thing?

I need to know that to config how much space I need for linux use. Thanks for helping so much.

And something else I want to ask:
How much space should I make for Ubunto? Is 20G ok or is it to little? pleas advice. thank you.

Last edited by Nsis; 09-10-2008 at 05:03 PM.
 
Old 09-10-2008, 05:02 PM   #2
w3bd3vil
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You wont be able to run the game from the windows partition, "some" games might work if you do some tweaks here and there.

Last edited by w3bd3vil; 09-10-2008 at 05:41 PM.
 
Old 09-10-2008, 05:10 PM   #3
Nsis
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Ok, I see, thanks.
So, can you help me with this?:

I have 2 HDD,
one is 150G and the other is 298G.
The 150G one have windows on it. Is it ok to shrink it (how much is depending on how much space I should give Linux), make a new voulome and install linux on it? I have dont this with my second drive fearing that Linux + Windows on same HDD (even if they are sepratede) is not smart, was I correct or I feard for nothing?

In my second HDD, I think I will divide it 50% 50% (or something like that), one for linux and one for windows.

If its ok to shrink my C drive [for 50G more or less maybe?] and make a new volume and isntall linux on it, it would be easier for me to mange my HDD "sharing" betwin Windows and Linux.

Thanks for reading.

Last edited by Nsis; 09-10-2008 at 05:12 PM.
 
Old 09-10-2008, 08:18 PM   #4
i92guboj
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You have to install them using wine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nsis View Post
Ok, I see, thanks.
I have 2 HDD,
one is 150G and the other is 298G.
The 150G one have windows on it. Is it ok to shrink it (how much is depending on how much space I should give Linux), make a new voulome and install linux on it? I have dont this with my second drive fearing that Linux + Windows on same HDD (even if they are sepratede) is not smart, was I correct or I feard for nothing?
Linux and windows can co-exist on the same drive without any big problem. It's usually easier if you install Windows first. However it's not critical.


Quote:
If its ok to shrink my C drive [for 50G more or less maybe?] and make a new volume and isntall linux on it, it would be easier for me to mange my HDD "sharing" betwin Windows and Linux.

Thanks for reading.
Describe your actual situation, and what your needs are, so we can recommend the easiest way around it. If you already have linux installed, there's no need to reinstall it in another drive. You can resize your windows partition to make some free space, create a new partition, and mount that partition under your $HOME/.wine/ to get the extra space under that directory. Or just mount your whole $HOME there (of course, you would first need to copy all the stuff on your $HOME to that partition).

You could as well mount your windows partition somewhere, and then symlink your ~/.wine to some directory under your windows partition. However,
  • you need to be very careful where you write, you could break your windows installation
  • I don't know how well or bad wine performs with a fat32 or ntfs filesystem, I only used it in linux native fs's
 
Old 09-11-2008, 03:32 AM   #5
Nsis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by i92guboj View Post
You have to install them using wine.



Linux and windows can co-exist on the same drive without any big problem. It's usually easier if you install Windows first. However it's not critical.




Describe your actual situation, and what your needs are, so we can recommend the easiest way around it. If you already have linux installed, there's no need to reinstall it in another drive. You can resize your windows partition to make some free space, create a new partition, and mount that partition under your $HOME/.wine/ to get the extra space under that directory. Or just mount your whole $HOME there (of course, you would first need to copy all the stuff on your $HOME to that partition).

You could as well mount your windows partition somewhere, and then symlink your ~/.wine to some directory under your windows partition. However,
  • you need to be very careful where you write, you could break your windows installation
  • I don't know how well or bad wine performs with a fat32 or ntfs filesystem, I only used it in linux native fs's
Thanks for this great answer, ill do that. How can I do what you said in here:
Quote:
You can resize your windows partition to make some free space, create a new partition, and mount that partition under your $HOME/.wine/ to get the extra space under that directory.
I mean, how do I mount the new partition to $HOME/.wine/?
And do I need to asing a name for that partition [format it using windows or something] or does it need to be just free space?

And sadly, I have deleted alrady Linux, but its not that bad i can re-install it I do have my back up data on CD\ stuff like that. I want to install it now on the same drive with windows, how much partitions should I set for linux? Is 40G for exmple ok or do I need more?

Thanks =]
 
Old 09-11-2008, 03:43 AM   #6
i92guboj
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nsis View Post
Thanks for this great answer, ill do that. How can I do what you said in here:

Quote:
You can resize your windows partition to make some free space, create a new partition, and mount that partition under your $HOME/.wine/ to get the extra space under that directory.
People usually use a livecd with gparted to do that. For example:

http://partedmagic.com/wiki/PartedMagic.php

You can download it and partition your disks at your desire with that. But before I give you any additional recommendation I need to know your disk layout.

From what I understood, you have two disks, let's call them hda and hdb for now just to shorten the thing. You have windows in one, let's say hda, and what to divide it to install linux into it. hdb will remain untouched, right?

If that's true, why don't you use your second hard disk for linux (maybe partially)? That way you wouldn't need to resize your windows partition. Toying with partitions is never 100% safe. You know, power outages always come at the worst moment.

I don't try to convince you of anything. I just want to get enough information so I can advice you in a better way.

Quote:
I mean, how do I mount the new partition to $HOME/.wine/?
And do I need to asing a name for that partition [format it using windows or something] or does it need to be just free space?

And sadly, I have deleted alrady Linux, but its not that bad i can re-install it I do have my back up data on CD\ stuff like that. I want to install it now on the same drive with windows, how much partitions should I set for linux? Is 40G for exmple ok or do I need more?

Thanks =]
I will answer these questions once I have all the info, because they might or might not be relevant depending on how you choose to use your hard disks.

Last edited by i92guboj; 09-11-2008 at 03:45 AM.
 
Old 09-11-2008, 03:52 AM   #7
Nsis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by i92guboj View Post
People usually use a livecd with gparted to do that. For example:

http://partedmagic.com/wiki/PartedMagic.php

You can download it and partition your disks at your desire with that. But before I give you any additional recommendation I need to know your disk layout.

From what I understood, you have two disks, let's call them hda and hdb for now just to shorten the thing. You have windows in one, let's say hda, and what to divide it to install linux into it. hdb will remain untouched, right?

If that's true, why don't you use your second hard disk for linux (maybe partially)? That way you wouldn't need to resize your windows partition. Toying with partitions is never 100% safe. You know, power outages always come at the worst moment.

I don't try to convince you of anything. I just want to get enough information so I can advice you in a better way.



I will answer these questions once I have all the info, because they might or might not be relevant depending on how you choose to use your hard disks.
Well, I can use the second HDD, but im thinking of doing this:
HDDA
for the 2 os systems (and thats it, 150G overall for hda is a lot of space for os systems right?)
HDDB
Devide this one, so one will have linux stuff on it, and the other for windows stuff. Actaully, beacuse this one is 250G, I can maybe devide it to 3 and install linux on the third part, but I need to know how much space I should give to Linux itself before I do the partition thing.

Baiscly im planing to keep most of my stuff\ games on HDDB [which some of it would belong to linux) so I wont keep much fiels on the Linux OS drive, however I dont know how much space I should give Linux (still a newbie).

Again, thanks for your help im new in this stuff (learnd what is parition only 2 days ago lol) thanks for being paitince

p.s I will download PartedMagic it looks pretty usefull...

Last edited by Nsis; 09-11-2008 at 03:54 AM.
 
Old 09-11-2008, 04:09 AM   #8
i92guboj
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nsis View Post
Well, I can use the second HDD, but im thinking of doing this:
HDDA
for the 2 os systems (and thats it, 150G overall for hda is a lot of space for os systems right?)
HDDB
Devide this one, so one will have linux stuff on it, and the other for windows stuff. Actaully, beacuse this one is 250G, I can maybe devide it to 3 and install linux on the third part, but I need to know how much space I should give to Linux itself before I do the partition thing.
Right. I get an approximate idea now. The system itself can take more or less, depending on what do you exactly need to do. An average linux system can fit comfortably under 10 GB. It can grow more, depending on what do you install and how do you use it.

Assuming you will be using it mainly as a desktop/gaming center, the big thing to worry about are games, of course. Still, 50 GB is plenty of space, overall, if you plan to mount your $HOME on your second drive. There aren't much big linux native games, and the windows games that you will use under wine will reside in your $HOME directory, that means that they will not take space in your system drive. You should also check the requirements for your distribution of choice, and then make a decission.

There's no need to say how important is to backup before proceeding further.

Download the parted cd. Once you have the iso, burn it (as image, not as regular file) to a cd, and boot from it. From there you should be able to resize your windows partition. You first need to shrink it to make room for the linux one (whatever size you decide). After that, make a new partition of the chosen size using that free space. Format it as ext3 if you don't know what filesystem do you want for your linux partition (make sure you don't format the windows one).

The same process can be used to divide the second disk: resize the existing partition, make a new one using free space, and format it as ext3.

Now it's time to install your distribution of choice. This is what can get tricky. Each distro has a different installation process and I know nothing about ubuntu. But it should be easy enough to figure. At one point, the installation will ask you where do you want to install linux (you might need to select some advanced mode or whatever). Make sure you select the ext3 partition in your first disk for /, and the ext3 partition in your second disk for /home. You can use the filesystem type (ext3) and the size, to identify the correct partitions. If all is ok, ubuntu should be autoconfigured with these partitions. You can check after installing by using the command "df" in a terminal.

Ask if you need. I know that this is a bit general, but I guess I or someone else can always explain in more depth if needed.

Cheers.

EDIT: When partitioning your second drive, leave one or two gigabytes at the end to create a small swap partition, it's always a good idea to have it just in case, and you are not going to miss one gigabyte So that drive would have a windows partition, a linux ext3 one, and the little swap partition.

Last edited by i92guboj; 09-11-2008 at 04:13 AM.
 
Old 09-11-2008, 04:23 AM   #9
Nsis
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Ok, thanks for all of your help. I think im set and I can do what you said, its very celar for me now =]

For the SWAP thu, what is it used for? And do I need it to be "fre space" or do I need to format it like the other paritions?
 
Old 09-11-2008, 04:40 AM   #10
i92guboj
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nsis View Post
Ok, thanks for all of your help. I think im set and I can do what you said, its very celar for me now =]
I am glad about that. Still, don't hesitate to ask if you hit any wall hehe

Quote:
For the SWAP thu, what is it used for? And do I need it to be "fre space" or do I need to format it like the other paritions?
Swap space is used to emulate ram when your ram is full. Linux can use it for some other things very efficiently, and it's always a good thing to have some swapping space available.

If by any chance, a given program has a bug and starts to leak memory, your ram can be filled pretty fast, once that happens, your kernel will start closing programs without any warning, and you can lose whatever you are working on at the moment, which is annoying to say the least.

If you have some swapping space you have -virtually- some spare ram, in case that the real ram is filled.

This is a very simplistic view, and not completely correct, however I think it will help you to understand the general picture.

Linux doesn't use the term "RAM" too much. We prefer to use the words "virtual memory". Linux can see a given amount of "virtual memory". That all the memory that a system has, and usually it's the physical ram + the swapping space. The programs do not care about the true nature of the virtual memory they use. They just request virtual memory, and it's up to the kernel to put each thing on a given place depending on many things to get the best possible performance under any load.

You don't have to format that partition. Just mark it as swap, I think that gparted might have an option to mark that, and maybe it's even in the list of available format (though it's not really a format).

Like the others, make sure that the installation process of ubuntu picks your correct swap partition for swap purposes, I think it should be mostly automatic
 
Old 09-11-2008, 05:35 AM   #11
Nsis
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It seems like GParted cant recognize my HDD, even thu if I go to media dir I can see them.

Any ideas why GParted cant see my HDD's? Is there a way to set stuff for the ubunto installition without using GParted?

Thanks |:
 
Old 09-11-2008, 06:56 PM   #12
i92guboj
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nsis View Post
It seems like GParted cant recognize my HDD, even thu if I go to media dir I can see them.

Any ideas why GParted cant see my HDD's? Is there a way to set stuff for the ubunto installition without using GParted?

Thanks |:
I think that there was a little square on the top-right corner to select your drives. Press on it and all your disks should be listed there.

You should be able to partition from the ubuntu installer as well (at least, most graphical installer should allow that). You might need to press some kind of "advanced stuff/expert mode" button.
 
  


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