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Old 01-27-2015, 04:02 PM   #16
ferrari
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@Higgsboson: I think you've completely misunderstood the OP's problem. It is not about putting an OS on USB flash memory, but rather that the device does not appear to be registered on the USB subsystem, (although this may be to do wit the privileges required for 'lsusb' to report the necessary), and they observe nothing reported in the kernel output when the device is first attached.
 
Old 01-27-2015, 10:03 PM   #17
dancing monkey
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USB stick does not work in Linux Mint 17.10

Dear Higgsboson,

Thanks for joining this thread. YYou may have gotten confused on what my issue is.. I am NOT trying to install Linux on a bootable USB stick. The problem I have is that there are 7 USB ports on my desktop and when I enter command lsusb with a USB stick in a port it does not show up. I have tried several other ports with the same result. Strangely, I have a wireless N adapter in one port that is described in the output, as is a wireless mouse plugged in to another port. To evaluate whether I have a hardware or software prroblem, I put a hard drive containing only Windows XP as an OS and the USB sticks were recognized and described perfectly. To me, this says I have a software not a hardware problem when I put the hard drive containing Linux Mint back in the desktop. I'm beginning to wonder when I installed Linux whether the act of putting several partitions on the clean hard drive somehow affected the showing of USB sticks.

Instead of accepting the default Linux install which puts only two partitions, a main partition and a swap partition, on the hard drive, I instead choose the install option called "do something else." This allowed me to create my own partitions and I created a /boot partion, / partition (root), /home, and swap partitions in that order. I can't see that there is anything erroneous about this.

Cheerio
 
Old 01-27-2015, 10:53 PM   #18
colorpurple21859
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Quote:
I've been using a Kingston 4 GB USB 2 stick and just tried a San Disk USB 32 GB stick.
Did the sandisk stick work or is no usb sticks working? What is the ouput of lsmod? and lspci and lsusb

Last edited by colorpurple21859; 01-27-2015 at 10:57 PM.
 
Old 01-28-2015, 01:07 AM   #19
ferrari
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Quote:
I'm beginning to wonder when I installed Linux whether the act of putting several partitions on the clean hard drive somehow affected the showing of USB sticks.
No, that has no relevance to the issue with the usb hardware.

Now, please check what is reported by 'sudo lsusb' and 'sudo usb-devices' (with the usb flash memory stick attached) as requested previously.
 
Old 01-28-2015, 03:53 AM   #20
Higgsboson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ferrari View Post
@Higgsboson: I think you've completely misunderstood the OP's problem. It is not about putting an OS on USB flash memory, but rather that the device does not appear to be registered on the USB subsystem, (although this may be to do wit the privileges required for 'lsusb' to report the necessary), and they observe nothing reported in the kernel output when the device is first attached.
I have no idea what you're talking about.

And the funny thing is, I don't think you do either.
 
Old 01-28-2015, 04:18 AM   #21
Higgsboson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dancing monkey View Post
To me, this says I have a software not a hardware problem when I put the hard drive containing Linux Mint back in the desktop.
I would agree.
Since you have a new Mint install, it's possible that the default packages are seeing your 2 other USBs but not your problem USB.
You could see if you need to install another driver package for the USB to be detected. But I think colorpurple21859 is addressing that.

Quote:
This allowed me to create my own partitions and I created a /boot partion, / partition (root), /home, and swap partitions in that order. I can't see that there is anything erroneous about this.
I agree. It must be a driver issue.
As Yancek says, is it not appearing under /media either?
 
Old 01-28-2015, 04:48 AM   #22
ferrari
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Quote:
I have no idea what you're talking about.
You really need to re-read this thread from the top. You mentioned
Quote:
Ok, so what program are you using to put Linux Mint onto your USB?
Is it Unetbootin, Yumi, pendrivelinux or something like that?
What does that have to do with getting the device recognised by the kernel. Any USB device (even without device driver support) will be reported by 'lsusb' with the chipset details, as part of the device descriptor.

http://www.beyondlogic.org/usbnutshe...iceDescriptors

Quote:
And the funny thing is, I don't think you do either.
I have a reasonable understanding of the USB subsystem, and I can categorically tell you that a working device should be registered upon attachment and 'lsusb' should display the chipset details. That is fundamental to the device being able to be handled in the first place.
 
Old 01-28-2015, 04:55 AM   #23
ferrari
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Quote:
I agree. It must be a driver issue.
As Yancek says, is it not appearing under /media either?
It did not get enumerated, and it didn't show up in the 'usb-devices' output as expected. (A supported device will be reported with the corresponding device driver bound to it, eg 'usb-storage' for memory sticks as you can check for yourself).
 
Old 01-28-2015, 05:14 AM   #24
Higgsboson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ferrari View Post
I have a reasonable understanding of the USB subsystem, and I can categorically tell you that a working device should be registered upon attachment and 'lsusb' should display the chipset details. That is fundamental to the device being able to be handled in the first place.
Sandisk have configured some flash drives to be detected as hard drives for Win8 certification.http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/w...0-9a1238c77310
This suggests problems may occur with Sandisk.
I couldn't get Win7 to see my Sandisk as a removable disk.
Also, the Unetbootin program on a linux system doesn't function properly when writing a .iso to the Sandisk usb.

Having said that, the usb does appear under 'lsusb' when I put it into a usb port.
 
Old 01-28-2015, 12:03 PM   #25
maples
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Higgsboson View Post
Ok, so what program are you using to put Linux Mint onto your USB?
Is it Unetbootin, Yumi, pendrivelinux or something like that?

It's good to know you have a linux operating system.
This should mean you can put Linux Mint onto your USB with fewer problems than if you were using Win7.

What linux OS are you using?
If you say Ubuntu or Debian etc, then more people who have the same OS will probably understand your problem.

I have a 32gb sandisk USB too. I have live debian with gnome desktop installed on it.
But your Kingston USB also is perfectly fine for installing a linux OS onto it.

Please say how you're putting Linux Mint onto your USB and what's stopping you from doing that.
This isn't the original poster's problem at all. (S)he already has Mint installed. The problem is that (s)he wants to use a USB flash drive, and Mint fails to recognize it.

EDIT: Whoops, looks like I forgot to check if there was another page of replies...
 
Old 01-29-2015, 04:09 AM   #26
ferrari
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Quote:
Sandisk have configured some flash drives to be detected as hard drives for Win8 certification.http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/w...0-9a1238c77310
This suggests problems may occur with Sandisk.
I couldn't get Win7 to see my Sandisk as a removable disk.
None of this is relevant to why the device is not being annunciated by the kernel.

Quote:
Having said that, the usb does appear under 'lsusb' when I put it into a usb port.
Yep, that's fundamental information related to how USB devices communicate with a host controller, which then communicates with the kernel 'usbcore' driver about the attached hardware. This is all done regardless of the device and does not involve any device-specific driver - that comes later in the sequence of events. (So even if the device is not supported, it will still be annunciated with it's chipset at the very least.) So, it is not yet clear why the device chipset is not reported by 'lsusb'. (It's almost as if the device is not being powered up when connected.)
 
Old 01-29-2015, 10:17 AM   #27
colorpurple21859
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what is the output of
Code:
demesg |grep usb
from plugging in the usb before turning on the computer. It wouldn't happen to be a usb3 stick in a usb2 port or vice a versa?
 
Old 01-29-2015, 01:12 PM   #28
ferrari
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The OP mentioned that the devices are USB 2 (refer post #13). The host controllers reported in the 'usb-devices' output (post #8) are a mixture of UHCI and EHCI chipsets. However, the OP also claims that when running Windows with same machine, then the memory stick does work. I agree that it would be a good idea to attach the flash memory at boot, and observe the behaviour.
 
  


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