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-   -   Upgrade or clean? That is the question... (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/upgrade-or-clean-that-is-the-question-769762/)

jmaddy10 11-17-2009 03:29 PM

Upgrade or clean? That is the question...
 
Hello all!

I am new to the linux scene. I converted from my microsoft ways about two weeks ago and have been REALLY happy with the way that my Ubuntu distribution is working (even though I underestimated how much space I needed to partition.)

So, here's my problem(s). I partitioned only 2.3 Gigs for the linux side of things (I wanted to be conservative and not mess with Windows functionality.) I can't download anything to my computer! The memory says it's full. See below,
_________________________________________________________
fernando@fernando-laptop:~$ df -h
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda5 2.3G 2.2G 0 100% /
tmpfs 1003M 0 1003M 0% /lib/init/rw
varrun 1003M 92K 1003M 1% /var/run
varlock 1003M 0 1003M 0% /var/lock
udev 1003M 156K 1003M 1% /dev
tmpfs 1003M 512K 1002M 1% /dev/shm
lrm 1003M 2.4M 1000M 1% /lib/modules/2.6.28-11-!generic/volatile
overflow 1.0M 16K 1008K 2% /tmp
__________________________________________________________

When I try to clean it out with the "sudo apt-get autoclean" command in the terminal, it doesn't clean any space.

This creates two problems:

1) When I try logging into the Windows Vista partition, I'm sent to a screen that prompts me to: (a) clean the disk drive of recent additions, (b) return the CPU to its manufactures condition, or (c) different variations of a and b.

Should I worry about this? I can't download the software to run the dual-environments without more space.

2) I can't download the files necessary to upgrade to 9.10 (and consequentely partition 8 Gs).

I want to thank you in advance for you time! :)

repo 11-17-2009 03:35 PM

from man apt-get

Quote:

clean
clean clears out the local repository of retrieved package files. It removes everything but the lock file from /var/cache/apt/archives/ and
/var/cache/apt/archives/partial/. When APT is used as a dselect(8) method, clean is run automatically. Those who do not use dselect will likely want to run
apt-get clean from time to time to free up disk space.

autoclean
Like clean, autoclean clears out the local repository of retrieved package files. The difference is that it only removes package files that can no longer be
downloaded, and are largely useless. This allows a cache to be maintained over a long period without it growing out of control. The configuration option
APT::Clean-Installed will prevent installed packages from being erased if it is set to off.
Try
Code:

apt-get clean

jmaddy10 11-17-2009 04:24 PM

____________________________________________________
fernando@fernando-laptop:~$ sudo apt-get clean
[sudo] password for fernando:
Sorry, try again.
[sudo] password for fernando:
fernando@fernando-laptop:~$ df -h
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda5 2.3G 2.2G 0 100% /
tmpfs 1003M 0 1003M 0% /lib/init/rw
varrun 1003M 108K 1003M 1% /var/run
varlock 1003M 0 1003M 0% /var/lock
udev 1003M 156K 1003M 1% /dev
tmpfs 1003M 400K 1002M 1% /dev/shm
lrm 1003M 2.4M 1000M 1% /lib/modules/2.6.28-11-generic/volatile
overflow 1.0M 240K 784K 24% /tmp
__________________________________________________
Okay, I did the apt-get clean command and then ran another diagnostic. Did I miss something?

jmaddy10 11-17-2009 04:27 PM

I just ran the diagnostic again and I realized that the "overflow" category fluctuates from minute to minute. Is this normal?

root@fernando-laptop:/var/cache/apt/archives/partial# df -h
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda5 2.3G 2.2G 0 100% /
tmpfs 1003M 0 1003M 0% /lib/init/rw
varrun 1003M 108K 1003M 1% /var/run
varlock 1003M 0 1003M 0% /var/lock
udev 1003M 156K 1003M 1% /dev
tmpfs 1003M 400K 1002M 1% /dev/shm
lrm 1003M 2.4M 1000M 1% /lib/modules/2.6.28-11-generic/volatile
overflow 1.0M 304K 720K 30% /tmp

johnsfine 11-17-2009 04:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jmaddy10 (Post 3760470)
I partitioned only 2.3 Gigs for the linux side of things (I wanted to be conservative and not mess with Windows functionality.)

I don't see where you might have told us how big your whole drive is, how full the Windows partition is, nor whether your current goal is to try to make do with just 2.3GB for Linux or to fix that.

I don't know nearly enough about Ubuntu to say anything about trying to work with just 2.3GB of disk.

If you want to fix that and have enough free space in the Windows partition, it shouldn't be too hard.

I assume you have a Ubuntu liveCD that can be used for the key steps: expanding and maybe moving the Linux partition and if you need to move it reconnecting GRUB in the MBR.

You probably shrank the Vista partition once already to install Linux, so you know how (from within Vista) to shrink it further. Then use the liveCD to expand Linux.

If that is what you want to do, ask any specific questions you have on whatever parts of the process you don't fully understand.

jmaddy10 11-17-2009 08:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by johnsfine (Post 3760538)
I don't see where you might have told us how big your whole drive is, how full the Windows partition is, nor whether your current goal is to try to make do with just 2.3GB for Linux or to fix that.

Whole drive = 155 Gigs (give or take)
Window's Partition = 149 Gigs (give or take)


Okay, let me clear up my intentions (I'm being a little scatter-brained). I want to clear up enough space so I can download a partition editor (GNU Parted) and resize my partitions.

Quote:

Originally Posted by johnsfine (Post 3760538)
I assume you have a Ubuntu liveCD that can be used for the key steps: expanding and maybe moving the Linux partition and if you need to move it reconnecting GRUB in the MBR.

You probably shrank the Vista partition once already to install Linux, so you know how (from within Vista) to shrink it further. Then use the liveCD to expand Linux.


Well, I actually installed Ubuntu from the program I installed on my USB drive. The process of installing the Ubuntu was very user friendly so I'm not sure how to partition the harddrive without the GUI.

Quote:

Originally Posted by johnsfine (Post 3760538)
You probably shrank the Vista partition once already to install Linux, so you know how (from within Vista) to shrink it further. Then use the liveCD to expand Linux.

I can't follow these steps, but I see where you are going with this.

I need to clean out enough space so that I can download the partition editor (among other things) to allocate more space to Ubuntu.

chrism01 11-18-2009 02:12 AM

fdisk -l

(lowercase L) as root would be more informative about your actual partitions

repo 11-18-2009 02:56 AM

Quote:

Okay, let me clear up my intentions (I'm being a little scatter-brained). I want to clear up enough space so I can download a partition editor (GNU Parted) and resize my partitions.
Why don't you use a live cd ?
Puppy has gparted.

Free up space on the windows partition, defrag the partition, and shrink it using the live cd
Please don't forget to backup your data before proceeding.

johnsfine 11-18-2009 07:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jmaddy10 (Post 3760721)
I actually installed Ubuntu from the program I installed on my USB drive. The process of installing the Ubuntu was very user friendly so I'm not sure how to partition the harddrive without the GUI.

I'm not sure what that usb program was, but I think it was a usb version of a Ubuntu liveCD and I think it includes a GUI partition editor, so I think you can reuse that usb to resize the Linux partition and reconnect grub to the MSB.

Quote:

I need to clean out enough space so that I can download the partition editor (among other things) to allocate more space to Ubuntu.
You need to use a partition editor from outside of the current installed copy of Ubuntu. Vista can resize the running copy of itself. Linux can't.

You probably already have a partition editor in the installed copy of Ubuntu and you can't use it for this.

The easiest way is to use a partition editor while booted from usb or CD. Probably the usb installer for Ubuntu that you already have can do the job. Otherwise, it is probably easier (from where you are now) to download the right usb or CD image from inside Windows (and copy or burn to the right media).

DavidMcCann 11-19-2009 10:01 AM

Download and create a CD of Insert Linux. This is a live CD distro especially created for rescue and repair. It will run from CD or RAM disk and includes Gparted. It's also got a text editor, browser (so you can look for help, if necessary), rootkit hunter, and the basic utilities.

thorkelljarl 11-19-2009 01:09 PM

Just in case...

If you run into trouble booting Vista, there are these to help you out of difficulty.

http://neosmart.net/dl.php?id=1
http://neosmart.net/blog/2008/window...disc-download/


It is advisable to use the Vista partitioner to change the Vista partitions. Many partitioners will shrink Vista, but not all will leave the resulting partition size and the size recorded in the Vista boot loader in correspondence. The difference causes Vista not to boot.

Remember to defragment Vista before moving the partition boundary. This tool will move data that the Vista defragmenter will not budge.

http://www.auslogics.com/disk-defrag/index.php

Here is a mini-guide that may be useful.

It is in no way to be construed as a promotion for, nor encouragement of, Ubuntu.

http://apcmag.com/how_to_dualboot_vi...lled_first.htm


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