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Old 08-23-2005, 03:15 PM   #1
FD789
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uninstalling redhat


I have windows xp and redhat 8.0 on my pc and i want to uninstall redhat but i dont know how so can someone please explain in detail how to do it without messing with windows?(i want to leave only windows xp on my pc)
 
Old 08-23-2005, 03:38 PM   #2
corfe
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Do you use the red hat or windows bootloader?

If you use the redhat bootloader and want to get rid of it, you can boot off your windows CD and tell it to repair the master boot record of your installation. That'll switch to a regular windows startup.

Then all you have to do is, from windows, delete the partitions that have redhat on them (I think right-click on "my computer" and choose manage, then look around in there for something like "logical drive management").

I hope you consider installing a free software OS again in the future. What made you decide to remove it? Lack of user-friendliness? Couldn't do anything in it you couldn't already do with windows? Took too much time to learn? Took too much hard drive space to leave around?

Just curious. Good luck, and sorry to hear you're getting rid of it!
 
Old 08-23-2005, 04:09 PM   #3
FD789
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Thanks for the reply.Well actually i dont even know why i installed.I just had redhat cd's sitting around so i thought why not.I cant use internet with it(needs a diff modem) and it's not that i dont like it, i just think it would be a hastle connecting to the net from tehre and learning and that there would be nothing valuable for me to learn there, but on the other hand i dont know much about it even thought i heard only good things about it.Why do you use linux and prfer it to windows?

As for your reply to my question, i dont know which bootloader i use, how do i check that?I dont have windows xp cd, but i can erase all partitions from PartitionMagic program in Windows, would that solve the problem?If yea, is there any order i should erase them in or just all one them (linux partitions) one by one how i see them?Please tell me erasing the partitions from windows with PM woul solve the problem
 
Old 08-23-2005, 05:19 PM   #4
corfe
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Erasing the partitions from partition magic will solve the problem. You don't need to do it in any particular order.

A good question to ask I guess is, when you boot up, do you see an option to boot to "Redhat"? If so, what does this menu look like?

Then I/we can help you remove this option. Removing the partitions won't remove this option to boot.

Also, about why I use linux, there are a multitude of reasons. Below is a long-winded treatise on "why I use linux", that you can ignore if you just want to get red hat off your darn hard drives





Well, first here are a few downsides of linux:
1.) Takes time to learn unless you're familiar with unix (which most people aren't)
2.) Not perfectly compatible with windows (many programs don't run, some file formats have problems, it can't write to NTFS, the newest type of windows partition)
3.) Not perfectly compabitle with some hardware (some modems, some older graphics cards, some network cards, etc.)
4.) Choosing a distribution can be difficult for a novice.

First of all, the benefits of linux:

I'm a tweaker, I like being a control freak about my system , and being able to (if I want) control nearly every aspect of it. I like the fact that almost anything I want to do can be done on the command line; this means I can do things on my home computer remotely even from a very slow internet connection (ever tried terminal services over an old modem connection? It takes forever just to wait for your wallpaper to load, and each window to open - with linux login, you can choose text-only). This also means I can setup scripts to run these text commands at regular intervals, or at the touch of a button. I like the way linux is used in systems as small as a USB stick, or as large as a supercomputer - it shows its power and flexibility. I like the fact that it's built by a community of mostly volunteers, and if any program on linux (including the kernel) ever goes into a direction people don't like, a group of companies and developers can fork the project into the proper direction. Thus there is competition even within linux. This happened recently with XFree86 (it was forked to XOrg, and now almost nobody uses XFree86), the graphical system for linux. I like the fact that upgrades are free, and security problems are not hidden from you. They are all discussed in open mailing lists. There is no such thing as "lock-in" on a linux system, they do their best to be compatible with every other system, even windows. There is no spyware for linux (at least not yet), and not many viruses. There haven't been any major worms yet either.

Package management systems are cool - in windows, if you want to install a program, you go on websites and try to download it. The uninstaller for a program usually doesn't remove everything, because it's a program. Windows doesn't keep track of what was originally installed. When you need to upgrade programs on windows, you have to go to the website for each program and download a new version. With linux, with one command, I can tell it to retrieve updates for ALL the programs on my system. The office suite, kernel, messenger, photo editor, web browser, security updates, etc. - it's ALL there. And uninstalling uses the same type of files as installing - "packages" - so the system can remove exactly every file that was installed originally. No clutter developing in your system over time.

You can easily copy your user settings to another unix/linux machine, and easily transfer (or even copy) your installation to another hard drive. With other systems it's not easy, and even when you find a program to do it, it's probably not legal.

I'm a programmer, and I like being able to look at the code of programs I use. I don't do it very often, and I'm sure most people don't. But it's information that's nice to have available to the public, because SOMEONE will find out something useful from it nearly everyday. People write patches, people fix bugs, people add features. Also, when someone says "Microsoft/Apple can login to any Windows/MacOS machine with their secret backdoor key", nobody knows whether or not it's true. MIT, stanford, and many of the best universities in the world have professors and students that use and look at the code in linux. With linux, since everything's open source, you can be pretty sure a claim like that is not true, because if it were true somebody would have figured out how and proven it already (in the code). Sure there are people looking at the code trying to exploit holes, but there are always more looking at it to fix them. With Microsoft/Apple there are both also, but it's the other way around.


Now, the problems with a Microsoft-only desktop world:

It can be a pain to use linux when it's not compatible with your files, or your hardware. There is such thing as "lock-out": I don't like the fact that in the desktop software world, one company owns some 95% of the market, and what's worse, in many aspects it's designed to be incompabitle with most other desktop systems (directX, word files, windows media files to name a few examples). I'm not suggesting that Microsoft or other companies should have to write a whole bunch of extra code just to support linux, windows, mac, and all the other OS's. I just think that if we had open standards, and used them, then they wouldn't have to. There should be choices in the normal computer products we try, competition is good. We shouldn't have to fear trying a new system because of incompatibility.

Have you ever been frustrated when your friend makes a plain text document with word 2003, and your word 2000 refuses to open the file? What changed about their file format so much that it can't even understand plain text? It has always seemed to me that Microsoft purposely changes the file format so you either need to upgrade, or tell your friend to save them in a legacy format (which a lot of novice users can't do).

I think that right now, even if somebody (say google or apple) wrote an office suite that was 10x faster than Microsoft's, had the same and better features, and was twice as user friendly, and only cost $5, hardly anybody would switch to it if it couldn't open all their old word files perfectly. And nobody will be able to open them all perfectly for a long time if the file format information isn't available to someone besides Microsoft. All the new computers in the store would still (as they do now) come with a $200-some "MS Office and Windows" tax, because everyone demands compatibility with their old files. Many people aren't using any features in windows more than what were already in windows 95 (internet, e-mail, instant messaging).

In 100 years, will we still be paying Microsoft the equivalent of $200 for each new computer, even if we only use the features from Windows 95? Just because we can't get any other system that's fully compatible with Windows 95 file formats? What if 100 years ago, 95% of the roads and gasoline were only compatible with Ford? It's been 100 years since Ford was started, how long would it have taken another car company to start to compete? It's even worse in the software example, because at least when Ford sells a car, they are selling something physical that cost them money (materials and manufacturing costs). When you buy a CD from Microsoft, it costs them less than a dollar to print the CD. And it's not hard to figure out how to get a car compatible with a road - but becoming 100% compatible with a complicated, closed file format is next to impossible without information on how it works.

If there were a reasonable balance in the computer market, compatibility would be encouraged (and even required for most products to be viable) and competition would exist through the industry - and I believe competition is good for any market. I don't think a reasonable balance will happen soon, but I like linux, and I hope to help it grow. I want to see it change the face of the computer industry.

*Phew* if you're still reading at this point, I hope I've at least got you thinking. Sleep on it a while, maybe linux isn't for you yet. But if I rang any bells with my speech, think about trying it again sometime. It can be refreshing trying a new system
 
Old 08-23-2005, 05:32 PM   #5
bosewicht
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Quote:
Originally posted by corfe
Well, first here are a few downsides of linux:
1.) Takes time to learn unless you're familiar with unix (which most people aren't)
2.) Not perfectly compatible with windows (many programs don't run, some file formats have problems, it can't write to NTFS, the newest type of windows partition)
3.) Not perfectly compabitle with some hardware (some modems, some older graphics cards, some network cards, etc.)
4.) Choosing a distribution can be difficult for a novice.
I don't really want to get off of the subject of the post, but i just had a few comments on your downsides to linux.
Quote:
Takes time to learn unless you're familiar with unix (which most people aren't)
I disagree, I think it takes patience, not necessarily time, but that might just be my opinion.

Quote:
Not perfectly compatible with windows (many programs don't run, some file formats have problems, it can't write to NTFS, the newest type of windows partition)
There is NTFS write support now(possibly limited, I haven't looked at it too much in a while), Open Office works really well, and there are apps that will allow you to run most common windows apps on *nix

Quote:
Not perfectly compabitle with some hardware (some modems, some older graphics cards, some network cards, etc.)
This is becoming less and less common esp for older hardware(ok, maybe not modems)

Quote:
Choosing a distribution can be difficult for a novice.
Oh God not this one, do a search on linuxquestions.org for which distro should I use. everyday it is asked at the very least one time. I think newbies choosing distros can be difficult for people either helping them before or after they have chosen and/or installed one.

Last edited by bosewicht; 08-23-2005 at 06:11 PM.
 
Old 08-23-2005, 06:10 PM   #6
corfe
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Perhaps you're right. I was just trying to be fair and not completely pro-linux. Anyways, I don't think any of my "downsides" are very good reasons for not using linux anyways, and I was trying to focus on my "reasons for".
 
Old 08-24-2005, 07:05 AM   #7
FD789
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Corfe, you will be happy t hear that i decided to keep linux I was thinking since i went thru a lot of trouble just to install it properly why not keep it?I just took 70% of space that i put for linux use and added it to windows since windows is my main os (for now) and i need the space!

I wanted to uninstall it because of 2 things, first i have redhat 8.0 which is old, plus i hear that it is not a very good linux os, plus i'm learning it from a linux redhat bible 7.3 or sometjhing like that so imagine how much i have to improvise!But that isall ok becasuse i dont mind learning AT ALL, actually i was quite happy while i was learning first few chapters with the shell (very interesting), i was messing with it, goinf theer and there, making foldersetc. it was fun.But then i came to a part where nearly all chapters require internet.So after all of the above problems i didnt have a compatible modem and there i got really pissed!Anyway i want to keep it and eventually upgrade to the newst redhat version, i hope you can tell me how to do that and whats approximately the size of it?And also what modem do you think would be the best for me to use with red hat, and would it also work with windows?But even if it doesnt its ok because i could switch modems depending on which OS i am currently using, isnt it?Anyway thanks for taking time to reply, you did help me some!
 
Old 08-24-2005, 07:07 AM   #8
FD789
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also do tell me the differences between linux distributions?I knwo its a dumb question but since i dont know much about linux i think its the question is ok.
 
Old 08-24-2005, 09:20 AM   #9
corfe
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First off, here's where to look for compatible modems (linuxquestions' own "hardware compatibility list").

The difference between linux distributions - here goes another long explanation :P Basically, almost all the software you find in your red hat distribution wasn't written by red hat itself. They're all open source programs written by various people or organizations. Red Hat takes the linux kernel (the most basic component of the system), and a large set of open source programs, and combines them all into one system, that's your "distribution". Different distributions combine these pieces of software in different ways, and organize the system slightly differently - some distributions might include certain programs that other distributions won't. Different distributions will have different tools for configuring them, different options during the install process, different ways of managing packages, and different default options. Some distributions might be great for having your grandmother use - others are meant for hardcore UNIX people. Don't worry, even if your distribution doesn't include a piece of software, you can always install it yourself. Recently, many distributions have made "live CD"s - CD's that you can burn and boot your computer off of, to try that distribution without installing ANYTHING to your hard drive. It might take a while to download on a modem, but if you have a CD burner and you're curious about distributions, take advantage of this. Maybe even get a friend with a faster connection to download them for you. All the distributions are basically compatible with each other, but sometimes the way you do something changes between distributions. I'd try out a couple, or look at some reviews online, if you can. Distrowatch is a good site for getting a sense of the variety (and popularity) of the different distributions - try clicking on some of the top distributions (they're on the right), and read the "about" paragraph (midway down the page).

A few good distributions to try: "Ubuntu" (which is a user-friendly distribution based on the distribution I use, Debian), "Fedora Core" (which is Red Hat's successor explained in the next paragraph), "Mandriva", "MEPIS". Some of the more hardcore distributions you'll probably hear about in the linux world: "Slackware", "Gentoo", "Debian".

About Redhat, a year or so ago Redhat started making 2 distributions (someone correct me if I'm wrong), one that you pay support for (which kept the name Red Hat), another that is more community based (Fedora Core). If you liked redhat (and a lot of people do), you probably want to upgrade to Fedora Core. I'm not sure how to do that, because I'm not familiar with red hat; you may want to google a bit, or post on the linuxquestions forum specific to the distribution "Fedora Core".
 
Old 08-24-2005, 01:43 PM   #10
FD789
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i see...well for now i'll stick to redhat adn after when i get more into it i might try out some new one or upgrade this one.You didnt tell me one thing, how do i upgrade my existing distribution?For example since im using redhat 80 how do i upgrade it to 9.0?Do i do it from redhat or have to go to their web-site or whatever?And is it free or not?
 
Old 08-24-2005, 05:42 PM   #11
corfe
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The latest version of Red Hat's free distribution, now called "Fedora Core", is at version 4. It looks like if you download the Fedora Core CD's and burn them, you can upgrade a previous red hat installation to this new version.

Screenshot

Since you're on a modem, you can either let the CD's download over several nights and burn them yourself, have a friend with a faster connection burn them for you, or order them online (some places like pctech burn free software CD's and ship them for a small fee, in this case $10).

Here is the link to the downloads - go down to the "downloading ISO Images" section, a regular PC is the first link under that section (i386).

Just download 4 files : FC4-i386-discX.iso, where X is a number 1-4.

Burn these 4 to CD's, and boot off the first. Make sure you choose your current redhat partition / installation when asked where to install to, and you can either tell it to upgrade your existing distribution, or install new. If you haven't really done anything special to your red hat installation that you want to keep, then you might as well install new.

Good luck, and feel free to ask more questions until all is clear!
 
Old 08-28-2005, 05:47 PM   #12
FD789
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Thanks, i'll try to find a fast conenction and if i do i will try it out, because with modem it takes too long even for a simple song to download.
 
  


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